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Academic Policies and Regulations

ACADEMIC ADVISING

You are responsible for knowing and meeting all degree requirements and for making every reasonable effort to obtain academic advising. Frequent communication with your faculty adviser will help insure that you have current academic information and are making adequate progress toward your educational goals. All departments require that you see your adviser at least once a semester.

To be assigned a faculty adviser, call or visit the department office of your major. In some major programs, it is important to specify your area of specific interest within the major when you request your adviser. If you are an undergraduate and have not yet declared your major, you are advised through the Office of Advising and Orientation.

Direct your general academic problems and concerns to the Office of Advising and Orientation (Meriam Library 190). If you are considering any type of teaching credential, you should also see the “Education” chapter in this catalog for detailed information on teaching credentials and programs, and where and how to get appropriate advising.

If you are a new or readmitted student, you are required to see an adviser in your major department either prior to your initial registration or during the first two weeks of the semester you first enroll.

If you change your major, you are required to see an adviser in the major to which you are changing and obtain his or her approval on the Change of Major form. You may obtain this form from the Office of Advising and Orientation.

You are invited to evaluate your academic adviser as one means of improving the quality of advising available on campus. Evaluations should be written, signed, and sent to the dean of the college sponsoring your major. The evaluation might include expressions of appreciation for excellent work as well as constructive criticism.

ACADEMIC HONESTY

You are expected to maintain a high standard of academic honesty. Dishonesty may bring grade reduction or other sanctions as provided in Section IV-A of the Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities. Copies of this publication are available from the Office of the Coordinator for Student Judicial Affairs, Kendall Hall 110. Also see the chapter titled “Student Judicial Affairs” in this catalog.

ATTENDANCE IN CLASS

You are expected to attend classes regularly. You should discuss absences with your instructors, but you may report an absence of more than a week’s duration to the Office of Advising and Orientation when it results from circumstances beyond your control, such as illness or accident. The office will then send notification of your absence and the reason for it to your instructors. Instructors can, if they choose, drop you from a course for non-attendance.

AUDITING COURSES

You may audit classes by paying the normal registration fee. An auditor is a student who enrolls in a course for informational purposes only. Regular attendance in classes is customary, but you do not take examinations and do not receive credit for the course. Enrollment as an auditor is subject to the permission of the instructor, and only after students otherwise eligible to enroll in the course on a credit basis have had an opportunity to do so. Auditors are subject to the same fee structure as credit earning students.

As an auditor, you may not change to credit status after the last day to add classes without special permission. Normally, if you are enrolled for credit, you may not change to audit after the second week of classes.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS BY CLASS LEVEL

Class levels are the categories used to classify students on the basis of units completed. Freshmen or First Year Students are those who have completed fewer than 30 semester units (45 quarter units). Students who have completed 30 to 59 semester units (45 to 89.9 quarter units) are considered Sophomores. Juniors are those who have completed 60 to 89 semester units (90 to 134.9 quarter units). Students who have completed 90 or more units (135 quarter units) have achieved Senior status. Graduate Students are those who have graduated with a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university.

COURSE CREDIT POLICIES

Academic Credit for Prior Experience

In recognizing that intellectual growth can occur in settings other than the classroom, CSU, Chico has adopted a policy under which students may petition to have their previous non-classroom experiences evaluated for possible academic credit, up to a maximum of 30 units for undergraduates. Credit for prior experience is not available to graduate students. If, after evaluation, it is determined that such experiences resulted in learning at a level of sophistication comparable to or greater than that provided by normal classroom instruction, you will be awarded credit in an amount based on the evaluation. You will not be granted credit for the experience per se, but for academic learning which took place as a result of, or along with, the experience. The college-level learning must comprise both theory and practice, be well documented, and be presented in a portfolio for evaluation. You must be enrolled in the university for the semester in which you receive credit. Academic credit earned for prior experience does not count as residence credit. CR/NC grading is mandated for academic credit for prior experience.

You may obtain additional information and a petition to request an evaluation of previous non-classroom experiences from the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs (Kendall 106). You must pay the appropriate fees for any credit granted.

Challenging CSU, Chico Courses

You may apply to challenge any course listed in the current University Catalog by passing a special examination on the course content. Courses applied toward a master’s degree may not be challenged. Credit earned by challenging courses will not apply toward residence requirements. CR/NC grading is mandated for challenged courses except in those contexts approved in advance by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. To challenge, you must be enrolled in the university and in the course for the current semester and pay the appropriate fees. You may not challenge a course if you have previously received credit for a more advanced course dealing with the same concepts.

To apply to challenge a course, you must submit an “Application for Credit by Examination” to the chair of the department offering the course by the end of the second week of classes. The application will include pertinent information concerning your educational background, readiness to challenge a course by examination, potential educational value of such a challenge in contrast to experiencing active enrollment in the course, and contact with a faculty member in the context of such enrollment. The department chair will approve or deny the application based on department policy and information on your application, and will notify you of the decision. If approved, the course instructor will administer a written examination to you. Where skills   are involved, a performance test may be required in addition to the written examination.

If you pass the examination, the course instructor will submit a credit grade for you on the regular class grade sheet at the end of the semester; the department chair will send a memorandum instructing the Registrar to enter the credit on your academic record as “passed by examination,” with a grade symbol of CR. If you fail the exam, you may remain in the course and receive a letter grade upon completion of the course. (You may request the CR/NC grading option, if appropriate, in accordance with established university policy and procedures.) Your application form and the examination will be retained in the department office for
at least one year.

No more than 30 semester units of credit earned by challenging courses may count towards the bachelor’s degree. Certain major requirements may be waived by departmental examination, but no units will accrue.

Credit by External Examination

Chico grants credit to those students who pass examinations which have been approved for credit systemwide. These include the CSU English Equivalency Examination, Advanced Placement (AP) examinations, and some College Level Examination Program (CLEP) examinations. See “Credit by Examination” under “Records and Registration” for additional information. A maximum of 30 semester units may count towards the bachelor’s degree (AP credit not included).

Extension and Correspondence Credit

Open University credit is now residence credit with limitations (refer to  Regional and Continuing Programs). (The California State University does not offer correspondence courses but will accept as nonresident credit baccalaureate-level correspondence courses from other regionally accredited institutions.) The maximum amount of extension credit which may be applied toward the bachelor’s degree is 24 semester units. If you are a graduate pursuing a master’s degree, refer to the “Graduate Education” section for specific limitations on the use of extension course credit. Extension credit may not be used to satisfy the residence requirement.

Transfer Credit

To obtain transfer credit for courses completed elsewhere, be sure that official and final transcripts from all schools you have previously attended have arrived at the Office of Student Records and Registration. If you attend summer school away from CSU, Chico, also be sure to request that your transcript be forwarded to the Student Records Office upon completion of your summer course work. The Student Data Form you receive about the middle of each semester indicates the cumulative units you have completed. This notation will give you a clue as to whether previously completed units from other schools have been transferred. Please see the section “Evaluation of Transfer Credit ” in the chapter “Records and Registration” in this catalog for additional information.

COURSE REGISTRATION, CHANGE OF PROGRAM, AND WITHDRAWAL POLICIES

Registration

Beginning fall 2003, registration will be real-time and, therefore, when students access the registration system, they will know whether they are enrolled in classes before the end of each registration session. Registration occurs in two phases: “registration by appointment period” and “the add/drop and schedule adjustment period.” The first phase will take place over a two week period several weeks before the beginning of each semester. Several weeks before the beginning of the course registration period, students will be mailed an invitation to register which will include the date on which students may begin registering and other information required by the registration system in order to gain access to registration. Students access the registration system either through TRACS, our telephone-based automated registration system, or through the Chico State Connection, our web-based portal. At the end of the real-time registration period, approximately three weeks before the beginning of the semester, all access to the registration system will be closed and students will be mailed a study list confirming classes added and a statement of account confirming payment of registration fees or indicating amount still due.

It is vital that the university has your updated permanent address on record. You are required to keep the university informed of all local and permanent address changes. If you wish to have bills mailed to an address which is different from either your local or your permanent address, you may submit a billing address to the university. Change of address forms are available in the lobby of the Student Records and Registration Office in Meriam Library Room 180.

After the first two week of classes adding and dropping via TRACS or the Chico State Connection portal ends. Thereafter, you will need to use the “Change of Program” (COP) process which, depending upon the amount of time that has elapsed, requires appropriate approvals from the faculty, department chair, and dean to add and drop courses. COP forms may be requested from the faculty, department offices, or from the Office of Student Records and Registration. COP forms submitted to the Office of Student Records and Registration with approval dates more then ten working days old will not be processed.

Registration procedures and policies may and do change more frequently than the publication of this catalog or the endurance of the catalog editor can stand. Please also see “An Overview of Registration” in the chapter, “Records and Registration,” in The University Catalog, as well as annual revisions and appropriate notices in The Class Schedule and on The Chico Web, for complete and up-to-date information on registration and fee payment procedures.

Adding and Dropping Courses, Changing Grade Options

Students may add or drop courses or change grade options without restriction or penalty and without instructor approval during the first two weeks of the semester using the telephone registration system (TRACS) or the Chico State Connection or, where necessary, by submitting a Change Of Program (COP) form.

Some classes require permission of the instructor or other special requirements to register. These are normally noted in The Class Schedule or you may be informed by a message on TRACS or on the Chico State Connection when requesting the course. In classes requiring permission of instructor to register, the instructor may provide you a TRACS ID number to use to add the course via TRACS or a COP form to add the class. The COP form bearing the instructor’s signature of approval must be submitted to the Student Records and Registration Office.

Exception for required remedial English and mathematics courses. During the first two weeks of the semester, students who request, add, or are placed in remedial mathematics and English courses may not drop those courses without written permission of the department chair or the chair’s designee. You may change sections using the TRACS conditional add/drop procedure.

Students who remain enrolled in classes for the semester may add and drop classes during the Add/Drop Period without financial penalty and are financially liable for classes in which they are enrolled as of the 2nd Friday of classes PLUS any classes in which they may subsequently enroll. See also chapter “Fees, Tuition, Refunds, and Holds” for refund policies.

During the third and fourth weeks of classes, COP forms to add, drop, or change grade options will require the approval signature of the instructor.

Use of TRACS to add and drop courses stops at the end of the second week of the semester. Thereafter you must use the COP process to add, drop or change the grade option.

If your request to drop a class is received and processed in the Office  of Student Records and Registration before the end of the fourth week of classes, that class will not appear on your academic record. After the fourth week, a letter grade of “W” (signifying “Withdrawal”) will appear on your academic record for each course approved for dropping. The grade of “W” carries no connotation of quality of performance and is not used in calculating your grade point average at Chico.

After the end of the fourth week of the semester (referred to as the “census date”), all COP forms to add, drop, or change grade option will require a serious and compelling reason (see below) and require approval signatures of the instructor, department chair, and dean of the college.

During the final three weeks of the semester, no drops will be permitted except for circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control (such as accident or serious illness) and when the assignment of an “Incomplete” is not practicable. (Reference: EM 98-06)

Students withdrawing from all their classes follow a procedure different from that for students requesting permission to drop only some of their classes (see “Withdrawing from the University” below). Failure to withdraw officially will result in grades of F, U, or NC in each course. If you are considering dropping or withdrawing, request assistance from the Office of Advising and Orientation and discuss your situation with your faculty adviser.

Serious and Compelling Reasons:

The following situations are typical of those for which “serious and compelling” is appropriate justification for approving withdrawals and changes of grade option after the fourth week of classes:

1. An extended absence due to a verifiable accident, illness, or personal problem serious enough to cause withdrawal from the university; for example, a one- to two-week absence with a doctor’s written excuse.
2. An extended absence due to a death in the immediate family. This applies to absences exceeding a week due to family affairs that must be attended to by the student.
3. A necessary change in employment status which interferes with the student’s ability to attend class. This change in employment status must be verified in writing by the student’s employer.
4. Other unusual or very special cases, considered on their own merit.

The following situations would not fall under the intent of “serious and compelling”:

1. Grade anticipated in class is not sufficiently high, or student is doing failing work.
2. Failure to attend class, complete assignments, or take a test.
3. Dissatisfaction with course material, instructional method, or instructor.
4. Class is harder than expected.
5. Pressure of other classes, participation in social activities, or simple lack of motivation.
6. A change of major.

Withdrawing from the University

Students who find it necessary to withdraw from CSU, Chico after enrolling for any academic term are required to follow the official withdrawal procedures. Failure to follow formal withdrawal procedures may result in the assignment of failing grades in all courses and the need to apply for readmission before being permitted to enroll in another academic term. Information on withdrawal procedures are available from Advising and Orientation, MLIB 190, 530-898-5712.

Students who are receiving financial aid funds must consult with Office Advising and Orientation prior to withdrawing from the university regarding any required return or repayments of grant or loan assistance received for that academic term. If a recipient of financial assistance under federal Title IV financial aid programs withdraws from the institution during a payment period the amount of grant or loan assistance received is subject to return and repayment provisions governed by federal law.

If you withdraw from the university, a portion of your fees will be reversed for withdrawals which occur on the first day of classes through the 60% point of the semester. Fees will not be reversed for any withdrawals that occur after this date, except for students who are unable to continue courses because of compulsory military service. See Refund Schedule and additional information in the chapter “Fees and Expenses” and current term information in The Class Schedule sections on “Important Registration Activities, Dates, and Deadlines” and “Fees, Tuition, Refunds, and Holds.”

If you find it necessary to withdraw from the university during the semester, you must complete the necessary forms at the Office of Advising and Orientation. After obtaining the withdrawal card, you will have an exit interview with an adviser and then clear any financial obligations to the university. You may also want to apply for a Planned Educational Leave (see below) at the Student Records and Registration Office (undergraduates only) if you are eligible.

During the final three weeks of the semester, you are normally not eligible to withdraw and receive W grades, except in the case of “serious  illness or accident” when assignment of an Incomplete is not practical. Under no circumstances will you be allowed to withdraw if you have taken final examinations.

Failure to withdraw officially can result in grades of F, U, or NC in  each course. If you are considering withdrawing, request assistance in the Office of Advising and Orientation and discuss your situation with your faculty adviser.

If for any reason you are unable to withdraw in person, write or call the Office of Advising and Orientation, 530-898-5712, to request withdrawal.

COURSE SELECTION POLICIES

Insofar as possible, you should plan your academic program with the assistance of a faculty adviser. Familiarize yourself with the required  and elective courses listed in the catalog for your major and with any other material provided by the departments or the university. It is particularly important to note whether certain prerequisites must be completed before taking other required courses in a given program. Failure to complete a prerequisite course may delay graduation or in other  ways adversely affect your program or progress. A typical program will contain 15 or 16 units a semester. If you have less than a superior record of scholastic achievement, you are advised to take no more than 18 units a semester.

Maximum Student Course Load

As an undergraduate student, you may usually enroll for up to a specified maximum number of units during Registration. Check The Class Schedule for the current maximum units limitations. After Registration, you may add courses up to a maximum of 21 units without special permission if you are in good academic standing.

If you are a senior wishing to enroll for more than 21 units, you must obtain approval from the chair of the department of your major and the dean of the college of your major. If you are not a senior, but an undergraduate with at least a 2.75 GPA in your two most recent semesters, you may petition to enroll in more than 21 units through the same procedures. Get petition forms from the Student Records and Registration Office. Return completed petitions to the Student Records Office before filing the COP form which brings the total units above the maximum. If you are a freshman or sophomore who has not declared a major, you must obtain approval from the Director of Academic Advising Services.

The Academic Senate has recommended that students on academic probation limit course loads to no more than 14 units.

As a postgraduate student, you may enroll for up to 16 units. You must obtain special approval to exceed 16 units from your departmental graduate adviser.

If you enroll for more than the authorized number of units, you will be disenrolled from the most recently added courses until your program is approved.

Remedial/Developmental Courses

The following courses have currently been designated as remedial/developmental: ENGL 001A, MATH 001A, MATH 001B, MATH 002A, MATH 002B, and MATH 003. These are designed to assist students in developing basic skills that are essential to successful university achievement. Additional courses may be designated as remedial or developmental when needed.

Credit for remedial/developmental courses does not count toward the bachelor’s degree. This credit will count, however, in establishing eligibility for financial aid and full-time enrollment status.

Independent Study and Special Purpose Courses

You may register for a maximum of 3 units per semester of independent study (courses numbered 199 or 299), with a maximum of 6 units applying toward a bachelor’s degree. All 199 and 299 courses (except honors) are graded CR/NC, and none will apply to a master’s degree program.

Your proposal for 199 and 299, as well as graduate 398 and 399 course work, must be approved by the department before you can finalize registration in such course work. If this approval is not granted until after the regular add period, permission of the department chair and college dean will be required (see instructions regarding 398 and 399 course work under “Graduate Education”).

Internship and Experience-Based Learning Courses

Internship and other experience-based courses are numbered 089, 189, 289, 389, depending on the course level. These courses involve business and other community work with placement in a business, public or private agency under the supervision of a qualified professional. A maximum of 15 internship units may be applied to a bachelor’s degree at CSU, Chico.

Planned Educational Leave/PEL (Undergraduate)

Planned Educational Leaves (PELs) are available to undergraduates who are in good standing at CSU, Chico. Leaves may be granted to students for a maximum of two consecutive semesters. Under limited educational circumstances, a PEL may be extended for up to two additional semesters. Requests for extensions must be made in writing to the Office of Student Records and Registration. Students who are granted a PEL maintain certain rights and privileges ordinarily associated with continuing student status, even though not officially enrolled. However, being on an approved PEL will not defer your student loans. Loans can only be deferred by continuous enrollment.

To Request a PEL:

1. Submit the “Planned Educational Leave Request” (Undergraduate) to the Office of Student Records and Registration, MLIB 180, no later than the end of the fourth week of classes during the first semester of the leave.
2. If you are receiving support services from Retention Services (MLIB 172), meet with your retention adviser regarding your leave before submitting your request form.
3. If you are an international student, see an International Student Adviser in the Center for International Studies (THMA 211) prior to your departure.
4. If you received student financial aid while attending CSU, Chico, consult with the Financial Aid Business Office (KNDL 213) prior to your departure.

Upon return after a PEL:

1. The university will anticipate your return as a continuing student based on the semester indicated on the PEL application and have you properly classified as a continuing student. You do not need to do anything if you return as planned. However, you must return to the university for the semester you indicated on your PEL request form or obtain approval from the Office of Student Records and Registration for
a change in your plans. If you do not return as planned, without notification, you will lose your PEL status and will need to reapply for admission when you wish to return to Chico.
2. Upon your return or as early as the TRACS Course Request Period for the semester of your return (April-June for fall, November for spring) purchase the appropriate Class Schedule from the Associated Students Bookstore. Follow the registration procedures and timeline provided there.
3. Call TRACS or access the Chico State Connection portal to request or add courses as desired and follow all other procedures for registration, financial aid, and fee payment.
4. You must request that official transcripts be forwarded to Student Records if you attended another college or university while on PEL.

For more information and the forms you should use to request a PEL, inquire in the Student Records and Registration Office, MLIB 180, 530-898-5142 or download the form at http://em.csuchico.edu/sro/forms.asp. If you are a graduate student, see “Graduate Education, Continuous Enrollment,” or inquire at the Office of Graduate Programs, THMA 209, 530-898-6880.

GRADING SYSTEM AND POLICIES

The Functions of Grading

Underlying the rationale for grades is the theme of communication. Grades communicate one or more of the following functions:

1. To recognize that classroom instructors have the right and responsibility to provide careful evaluation of student performance and the responsibility for timely assignment of appropriate grades;
2. To recognize performance in a particular course;
3. To act as a basis of screening for other courses or programs (including graduate school);
4. To inform you of your level of achievement in a specific course;
5. To stimulate you to learn;
6. To inform prospective employers and others of your achievement.

Most courses employ standard letter grading described below. In some classes all students will be graded A, B, C, NC (No Credit) and in others CR (Credit) or NC only, as determined by the department. Students will be advised at the beginning of a course if either of these patterns is to be used.

DEFINITION OF LETTER GRADING SYMBOLS

Undergraduate Courses (numbered 1 to 299):

A — Superior Work:

A level of achievement so outstanding that it is normally attained by relatively few students.

B — Very Good Work:

A high level of achievement clearly better than adequate competence in the subject matter/skill, but not as good as the unusual, superior achievement of students earning an A.

C — Adequate Work:

A level of achievement indicating adequate competence in the subject matter/skill. This level will usually be met by a majority of students in the class.

D — Minimally Acceptable Work:

A level of achievement which meets the minimum requirements of the course.

F — Unacceptable Work:

A level of achievement that fails to meet the minimum requirements of the course. Not passing.

Graduate Courses (numbered 300 to 399)

A — Superior Work:

A level of achievement so outstanding that it is normally attained by relatively few students.

B — Adequate Work:

A level of achievement indicating adequate competence in the subject matter/skill. This level will usually be met by a majority of students in the class.

C — Minimally Acceptable Work:

A level of achievement which meets the minimum requirements of the course.

F — Unacceptable Work:

A level of achievement which fails to meet the minimum requirements of the course. Not passing. Because a C is the minimal acceptable grade for a 300-level course, a D grade is not allowed.

Use of Plus/Minus Symbols and Grade Points:

Standard letter symbols will be used with + and - modifiers for undergraduate and graduate grading, with the following associated grade points:

 

A = 4.0

A- = 3.7

B+ = 3.3

B = 3.0

B- = 2.7

C+ = 2.3

C = 2.0

C- = 1.7

D+ = 1.3

D = 1.0

 

F = 0.0

WU = 0.0

 

The use of plus/minus modifiers still permits A, B, C, D, and F grades to be used in disciplines or courses where finer divisions are not possible.

Computation of Grade Point Average (GPA):

The Grade Point Average is determined by dividing the number of grade points earned by the number of units attempted. Credit/No Credit grades are not computed in a grade point average; Credit grades count toward total units passed and, therefore, towards graduation (No Credit grades do not count). Grade points are awarded on the point scale described above.

Grade point averages for students individually and collectively, and for courses, departments, and the university will be computed and reported to four decimal places.

Grades of WU and IC are calculated in grade point average at Chico. Grades of Incomplete (I), Withdraw (W), and Audit (AU) are not calculated in grade point averages at Chico.

Credit/No Credit Grading:

Note: If you plan to transfer to graduate or professional schools, be aware that some schools in evaluating transfer credit may regard Credit (CR) grades as C’s and No Credit (NC) grades as F’s.

Mandated ABC/No Credit or Credit/No Credit Grading

In some classes all students will be graded ABC/NC (undergraduate level) or AB/NC (graduate level) and in others courses CR (credit) or NC (no credit). Students will be advised at the beginning of a course if either of these patterns is to be used.

CR/NC grading is mandated for courses in which standard grading procedures are not practical or possible (i.e., independent studies, credit for prior experience, or challenge exams).

Optional CR/NC Grading

Courses required for your major or minor and courses used to satisfy General Education requirements must be taken for a letter grade. In elective courses, i.e., those not taken for the major, minor, or General Education requirements, undergraduate students are allowed the option of taking courses CR/NC. Up to 30 units of elective CR/NC coursework may be applied to a bachelor’s degree program. In some courses CR/NC is the only grading pattern allowed, and these will not count as part of the 30-unit limit.

In courses taken for an optional CR/NC grade, the instructor will apply the same criteria to all grades in the course. After grades are determined, reported, and recorded using the standard ABCDF scale, the grade is converted to CR/NC according to the following criteria. For courses numbered 1-299, CR is defined as C- or better; NC will be awarded for D, F, or WU work. In 300-level courses, CR is defined as a B- or better and NC will be awarded for C, D, F, or WU work.

As a graduate student you are allowed 10 units of CR/NC in a master’s program; however, within the major department only 398/399 courses or courses graded CR/NC only may be taken as CR/NC. There is no restriction on the number of CR/NC courses that you can take if you are a postbaccalaureate student who is not in the master’s program.

You may elect CR/NC grading before the end of the second week of class by completing a CR/NC form available from the Office of Student Records and Registration. During the third and fourth week instructor approval is required. After the fourth week you will need a serious and compelling reason and the permission of the instructor, department chair, and college dean to change your grade option.

Other Grading Symbols

AU — Audit

An AU denotes registration in a course in which fees are paid but for which no credit is earned by the student. Completion of the course will result in the grade of AU being posted to the student’s permanent record.

I — Incomplete:

An I signifies that a portion of required coursework has not been completed and evaluated within the prescribed time. Incompletes (I) will be assigned only in cases where instructors conclude that a clearly identifiable pattern of course requirements cannot be met for unforeseen reasons.

An incomplete must be made up within one calendar year from the end of the term for which it was assigned whether or not you maintain continuous enrollment. Failure to complete the assigned work will result in a grade change from I to IC or NC, depending on the grading method for the course.

It is your responsibility to bring pertinent information to the instructor and to reach agreement on the means by which you will satisfy remaining course requirements. The conditions for removal of the incomplete shall be put in writing by the instructor and given to you with a copy placed on file in the department office. A final grade is assigned when the work agreed upon has been completed and evaluated.

You are NOT to re-enroll in a course in which you have received an incomplete, I, grade. If you do, the I reverts to an IC or NC, depending on the grading method for the course.

IC - Incomplete Charged

The IC symbol may be used when a student who received an authorized incomplete (I) has not completed the required course work within the allowed time limit. The IC replaces the I and is counted as a failing grade for grade point average computation. You have one year (two semesters) to complete all work for a course in which you received a “I” (Incomplete) grade.

WU — Withdrawal Unauthorized

The symbol “WU” indicates that an enrolled student did not withdraw from the course and also failed to complete course requirements. It is used when, in the opinion of the instructor, completed assignments, or course activities, or both were insufficient to make normal evaluation of academic performance possible. For purposes of grade point average, computation this symbol is equivalent to an “F.” The instructor shall report the last known date of attendance by the student. In courses which are graded Credit/No Credit or in cases where the student has elected Credit/No Credit evaluation, use of the symbol WU is inappropriate and NC shall be used instead.

RD — Report Delayed/NR — Not Reported:

RD or NR indicates that the instructor has delayed or not reported a grade. It does not indicate that you failed to complete the work required. An RD or NR is due to faculty action rather than student action.

RP — Report in Progress:

The “RP” symbol is used in connection with courses that extend beyond one academic term. It indicates that work is in progress but that assignment of a final grade must await completion of additional work. Work is to be completed within one year except for graduate degree theses. It is employed in connection with Independent Study (398), Master’s Study (399), and similar courses (e.g., designated Special Topics/298 courses approved for this grading option) where assigned work frequently extends beyond a single academic term and possibly requires enrollment in more than one term. Cumulative enrollment in units attempted may not exceed the total number applicable to your educational objective. Work must be completed within one year of initial enrollment for 398 courses and within the seven years allowed for the completion of the master’s degree for 399 courses.

W — Withdrawal:

A withdrawal (W) grading symbol indicates that you were permitted to drop the course with appropriate approval after the fourth week of the semester. Withdrawals that occur within the first four weeks do not appear on your permanent record. The symbol carries no connotation of quality of your performance and is not used in calculating your grade point average. See the preceding sections on “Dropping Courses” and “Withdrawing from the University” for additional information.

Course Objectives

Each member of the faculty will write and distribute for each course, consistent with the nature of that course, clearly stated objectives which will facilitate the instructional and evaluative processes. This is commonly referred to as a course syllabus. Students should be informed by the instructor about the level of achievement that is expected for each letter or a credit grade.

In multiple-section courses, instructors usually meet to discuss goals, objectives, procedures, course materials, and criteria for evaluation. While complete uniformity is not essential, departments strive for basic uniformity of goals, subject matter, and grading patterns in multiple-section courses.

Narrative Evaluations in Major Courses

In certain courses required for the major and selected by a department, instructors will provide students with a written narrative evaluation addressing such matters as ability to express ideas in an organized way, effective participation, and motivation.

Assignment and Change of Grades

To verify that assigned grades are identical to posted grades, the office of Student Records and Registration shall provide instructors with a final copy of the posted grades for each course.

It is presumed that grades assigned by the responsible instructor are correct. For a grade to be changed, an appeal must demonstrate that the grade was not correct.

In the absence of a compelling reason for change, the grade assigned by the responsible instructor is final. Examples of compelling reasons for a change of grade include:
1. Instructor error in computing or marking the grade;
2. Clerical error by the Office of Student Records and Registration in posting the grade;
3. Prejudice on the part of the instructor in assigning the grade, or;
4. Failure by instructor to follow grade standards described in the course.

You may appeal an assigned grade to the instructor of record. Then,
1. If the instructor of record agrees there is a compelling reason to change the grade, a change of grade resulting from this review will be made on an official Change of Grade form provided by Student Records and Registration. The responsible department chair and college dean must approve the change and countersign the form.
2. If the instructor of record does not agree there is a compelling reason to change the grade and you, the student, still believe the assigned grade to be incorrect, you may pursue the complaint through the Student Grievance Procedures as described in EM 94-22 and referenced below.
3. If the instructor of record is not available, the department chair, in concurrence with the dean and the Coordinator of Student Judicial Affairs, may authorize a change of grade.

No grades may be changed on a student academic record after a degree has been granted and posted on the academic record.

Grievance Procedures Related to Grades

Grievances related to grades, university services, and academic programs on and off campus may be resolved either by an informal or formal process through the use of the Student Grievance Procedures. Every student has the right to use these procedures. Consult the Coordinator for Student Judicial Affairs, Kendall Hall 110, 530-898-6897, for further information.

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND DISQUALIFICATION

Academic Probation

You are placed on academic probation any time either your cumulative or CSU, Chico grade point average falls below 2.0. The Academic Senate has recommended that you limit your course load to no more than 14 semester units until you are removed from probation. To avoid program probation, graduate students in master’s programs must maintain a 3.0 grade point average subsequent to admission to the master’s program (see the “Graduate Education” section for details).

If you are on academic probation, you are required to meet with your academic adviser no later than the end of the second week of classes each semester until you attain clear standing. You are also strongly encouraged to meet with a staff member in the Office of Advising and Orientation. You will be removed from academic probation when both your cumulative grade point average in all college work attempted and your CSU, Chico grade point average are 2.0 or higher.

Academic Disqualification

You become subject to academic disqualification while you are on academic probation. Disqualification is a consequence of failing to earn enough grade points based on what your class level will be at the end of the semester and the number of units you have attempted. If disqualified, you will not be allowed to continue in the university unless you are reinstated.

If your Chico or cumulative grade point average is less than 2.0, you should check whether your grade point deficit makes you subject to disqualification as follows:

First, determine the number of grade points you would have if you had a 2.0 grade point average by multiplying the number of units you have attempted by two. Next, subtract from this number the number of grade points you have actually earned. The result is your grade point deficit. For electronic assistance in computing your grade point average, visit the URL at http://em.csuchico.edu/aap/Undergrad/probation/gpa.asp.

To determine if you will be disqualified, check the scale below. If you entered the semester on probation and your grade point deficit is equal to, or greater than the deficit listed for your class level, then you are subject to disqualification.

Grade Point Deficiency below 2.0 GPA by Class Level:

 Freshmen-Sophomores (0-59+ units)  

 15 or more

Juniors (60-89+ units)

  9 or more

Seniors, Postgraduates, Credential Candidates, and Unclassified (90 and above units)

 6 or more

Most disqualification actions are taken at the end of the spring semester. Notification to students affected is made as soon after the end of the semester as possible. Disqualified students may take self-support courses through Continuing Education but will not be allowed to enroll in courses taught under the Open University program except with special permission.

You may also become subject to academic disqualification while not on academic probation if your cumulative grade point average falls below 1.0, and the cumulative grade point average is so low that in view of the student's overall educational record, it seems unlikely that the deficiency will be removed within a reasonable period.

Administrative-Academic Probation

You may be placed on administrative-academic probation for any of the following reasons:
1. Withdrawal from all or a substantial portion of your program of studies in two successive terms or in any three terms.
2. Repeated failure to progress toward your stated degree objective or other program objective (when such failure appears to be due to circumstances within your control).
3. Failure to comply, after due notice, with an academic requirement or regulation which is routine for all or a defined group of students.

When placed on administrative-academic probation, you will be notified in writing and provided with both the conditions for removal from probation and the circumstances which would lead to disqualification, should probation not be removed.

Administrative-Academic Disqualification:

If you are on administrative-academic probation, you may be disqualified from further enrollment if:
1. You do not meet the conditions for removal of administrative-academic probation within the period specified.
2. You become subject to academic probation while on administrative-academic probation.
3. You become subject to administrative-academic probation for the same or similar reason for which you were placed on administrative-academic probation previously, although you do not currently have such status.

When such action is taken, you will receive written notification, including an explanation of the basis for the action.

Reinstatement

You may seek academic reinstatement after one year (two semesters) has elapsed since disqualification. You must submit a letter of appeal before the established deadline. These deadlines can be found in the “Academic Calendar” in the front section of The University Catalog. You must also submit your application for readmission and application fees in conjunction with your letter of appeal for reinstatement. Consult the Office of Advising and Orientation for assistance. Send your letters of appeal to the Academic Status Committee, in care of the Office of Advising and Orientation.

Clear Standing

You will be removed from academic probation when your cumulative and CSU, Chico grade point averages are 2.0 or higher. You will be removed from administrative-academic probation when the conditions which led to your probation status have been removed. If you have been disqualified and since then have raised your GPA to 2.0 or higher, you must still appeal to the Academic Status Committee (see “Reinstatement” above) to gain reinstatement and clear standing at the university.

See the URL at http://em.csuchico.edu/aap/Undergrad/probation/gpa.asp for electronic assistance in computing your grade point average.

REPEATING COURSES

General Repeat Policy

Students may repeat courses originally taken for a letter grade if the earlier attempt resulted in a grade of C- or lower. Graduate students may repeat courses in which they earned a grade of B- or lower. The repeated course grade will be averaged with all other grades in determining the grade point average. There is no limit to the number of units which may be repeated when grades are averaged together under this policy. Except for specially designated courses, units earned for a course count only once toward degree requirements. In instances where a student repeats a course for which a grade of C or better (B or better for graduate students) was earned, neither units attempted, passed, or grade points will be counted toward degree requirements. Courses originally taken in which the student earned a grade of No Credit may be repeated. If a student enrolls in a course for which the grade of record is I, the I will revert to an IC grade and be counted as an F in the grade point average calculation.

In any course or program where enrollment demand exceeds the resources to offer sufficient openings or sections to meet that demand, the academic unit may give registration priority to students taking the course for the first time.

Undergraduate Repeat with Forgiveness

This policy applies to a course taken repeated at Chico, not elsewhere. If you have graduated, you may not use the provisions of this policy to repeat for forgiveness a course taken prior to your date of graduation.

No more than two courses may be repeated with forgiveness at CSU, Chico. Undergraduate students who wish to repeat courses at CSU, Chico and have the earlier letter grades deleted in the computation of their cumulative grade point averages may do so under the following conditions:

1. if the earlier attempt resulted in a grade of C- or lower;
2. the student has already enrolled in the course;
3. there is no regression involved;
4. a petition stating that the course is being repeated with grade forgiveness is submitted by the student to the Office of Student Records and Registration;
5. the student has not exceeded the two course limit.

The office of Student Records and Registration will determine whether the petition meets these five criteria. If the course was originally taken at another institution, the department will be responsible for determining whether there is reasonable equivalency.

Under this policy, only the last grade earned will be calculated in the grade point average. All grades will remain on the student’s permanent record, but the record of a previous grade in the course will be marked to indicate that the course has been repeated. This forgiveness policy may not be invoked to remove an incomplete, nor does it apply to a course first taken Credit/No Credit.

Students may receive approval for only two repeat-with-forgiveness petitions. If a petition to repeat with forgiveness does not meet the five criteria and the course is completed, then the repeated course grade will be governed by the General Repeat Policy above.

Other schools outside the California State University system, including professional and graduate schools, may not honor this policy on repetition of courses with forgiveness. Veterans should consult the Office of Veterans Affairs to determine the impact of course repetition on their eligibility for benefits.

Forms are processed three times a year, after each grade cycle. If you are submitting a repeat petition after the grade cycle, the petition will be processed in the next grade cycle (at the end of the next semester) unless a “Rush Fee” is submitted with the petition to pay for immediate processing.

Graduate Repeat with Forgiveness

Postbaccalaureate students pursuing either a second bachelor’s degree,  a second major, a credential, or a minor are subject to the undergraduate repeat policy but must file their petition with the Office of Graduate Programs.

Once you have a bachelor’s degree, you may not raise your undergraduate grade point average by repeating a course taken as an undergraduate. If you wish to repeat a course you have taken as a postbaccalaureate, not noted in the above categories, you must file a petition in the Office of Graduate Programs. This petition must be approved by the appropriate program adviser. Approval may be granted according to the following stipulations:

1. The earlier attempt resulted in a grade of B- or lower.
2. A maximum of one course may be repeated with forgiveness.
3. No regression is allowed.
4. A course which may be taken more than once for credit may not be repeated with forgiveness.
5. Equivalency must be clearly established for courses originally completed at another institution.
6. You may not petition to repeat at another institution a course which was originally taken at CSU, Chico.
7. You must be enrolled in the class.

If the petition is approved, only the last grade earned in the course will be calculated in the grade point average.

Veterans should consult the Office of Veterans’ Affairs to determine the impact of course repetition on their eligibility for benefits.

ACADEMIC FORGIVENESS

Under very restrictive circumstances, you may raise your grade point average sufficiently to graduate by petitioning the University Academic Status Committee to have one term of undergraduate work taken at CSU, Chico or elsewhere eliminated from bachelor’s degree evaluation. Although the term’s work will still appear on your record, grades which you received that term will not be computed into your grade point average. Any courses which you passed that term will not apply toward baccalaureate requirements. Eligibility criteria for forgiveness include:

1. Completion of all degree requirements except that your grade point average is less than the required 2.0;
2. A lapse of five years since you completed the petitioned coursework;
3. Completion of 15 semester units at CSU, Chico with at least a 3.0 grade point average, or 30 semester units with at least a 2.5 grade point average, or 45 units with a 2.0 grade point average subsequent to the petitioned coursework.

In some cases application of the campus policy on repeating courses may be more appropriate than the forgiveness policy in order to improve your academic status. Direct your petition and questions to the Office of Advising and Orientation.