Economics Course Offerings

Please see the section on "Course Description Symbols and Terms" in the University Catalog for an explanation of course description terminology and symbols, the course numbering system, and course credit units. All courses are lecture and discussion and employ letter grading unless otherwise stated. Some prerequisites may be waived with faculty permission. Many syllabi are available on the Chico Web.

Introduction to Economics
3.0 Fa/Spr

A non-technical introduction to economics with coverage of both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Overview of the evolution of economic concepts and ideas. Application of economics to current problems such as inflation, unemployment, the financial sector, the economics of regulation, market imperfections, environmental problems, and international economics. Consumer decision making and different market models are included. (Can be substituted for ECON 102 in the major if students also take ECON 330 as one of their 300-level electives.) This is an approved General Education course. (002635)

Principles of Macroeconomic Analysis
3.0 Fa/Spr

An introductory survey of macroeconomic analysis. Use of fundamental economic concepts to analyze the over-all economy. Determination of gross national product, rates of unemployment, problems of inflation, recession, and the use of governmental policies. Discussion of current problems. This is an approved General Education course. (002636)

Principles of Microeconomic Analysis
3.0 Fa/Spr

An introductory survey of microeconomic analysis. Analysis of individual economic units: household, firms, and markets. Analysis of individual decision making. Supply and demand analysis. Type of market organization: competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. Discussion of current problems. This is an approved General Education course. (002638)

Microeconomic Analysis
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 103.

Microeconomics examines the economic behavior of individual decision-making agents, such as consumers, resource owners, and firms. The goal of this course is to build a theoretical foundation to study various applied fields in economics and management (such as international trade, public finance, labor, or environmental economics). Topics include consumer theory, production and cost analysis, theories of the firm and markets, and welfare economics. (002647)

Macroeconomic Analysis
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 102.

An extension of macroeconomic concepts and principles relating to short-term stabilization policies, long-term growth questions, fiscal and monetary theory and policy, international dimensions, and problems of inflation, deflation, unemployment, productivity, and growth. Theories and models are used to examine, develop, and analyze macroeconomics issues, problems, and policies. (002648)

Roots of Modern Economic Thought
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102.

A historical survey of major economic theories developed by various schools of economic thought, including preclassical, classical, neoclassical, Marxian, and Keynesian. Reviews the writings of major economic figures. (May not be counted for credit toward a major in Economics if ECON 410 is used.) (002653)

American Economic History
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102.

Economic growth and development in the United States, emphasizing the periods of American mercantilism, laissez faire, corporate capitalism, and increased government involvement in the economy. Contrast to different economic perspectives in interpreting American economic history. (002657)

Money and Credit
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 102.

Financial markets and financial institutions. Impact of money and credit on the economy. Central banking and monetary policy. International finance. Macroeconomics and monetary theory will be emphasized. (Can be substituted for ECON 102 in the major.) (002660)

Tax Theory and Policy
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 103.

Examines the structure, rationale, and impacts of various federal, state, and local taxes on individuals, corporations, and various levels of governments. Taxation fundamentals and policy issues and controversies are a central part of this course. The focus is on practical aspects of various taxes, including personal income tax, consumption, sales, excise, and property taxes. Both historical tax philosophies and currently accepted taxing practices are examined as well as evaluating current proposals to change existing tax structures at the local, state, and federal levels. (002661)

Work, Wealth, and Income Distribution
3.0 Fa/Spr

Investigation of the nature and causes of income distribution in the United States. Consideration of the social and economic forces which generate income levels and determine patterns of economic mobility over time, interweaving theoretical, descriptive, quantitative, and normative aspects. This is an approved General Education course. (002662)

The Economics of War
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102 or ECON 103.

While many people are fascinated by the military tactics that win a war, wars are often fought for resources, and the side with the most resources usually wins. Even terrorism can be viewed from an economic perspective. This class first examines the circumstances in which war is good for the economy. Also covered are the following topics: the impact of defense spending, the supply of military labor, the rise of the corporate warrior, the process of weapons procurement, the cause and the effect of civil wars, the demand and supply of hatred, the rise of terrorism, and the demand and supply for weapons of mass destruction. Also emphasized are the wars in which the U.S. has participated starting with WWI and ending with the Iraq War and the War on Terrorism. (020683)

The Economics of Big Business
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 103 or faculty permission.

The study of large business firms and their markets. An examination of how industrial structure and firm behavior influence economic performance. Mergers, takeovers, multinational corporations, and other current issues. (002666)

Medical Economics
3.0 Fa/Spr

An examination of the health care industry and its role in fulfilling national health needs. Topics include national health insurance, health financing, and resource allocation. This is an approved General Education course. This course is also offered as HCSV 333. (002667)

The Economics of Government Regulations
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 103.

An overview of the economics of government regulation with emphasis on the formulation of regulatory policy, alternative methods of regulation, and the economic impacts of such policy. Topics may include environmental regulation, energy conservation policy, consumer protection, antitrust policy, and a critical evaluation of market-based regulatory policy. (002668)

Urban Problems
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 103.

An application of principles of economics to problems occurring in urban areas. Topics may include pollution, land use policy, education, poverty, transportation/congestion, location theory, migration, and the structure of local government. Emphasis will be on the usefulness of economics for understanding urban problems and for creating policy to deal with these contemporary issues. (002669)

Environmental Economics
3.0 Fa/Spr

An analysis of the costs and benefits of environmental preservation. Systems for creating economic incentives for pollution abatement. Criteria for establishing optimum pollution abatement, including efficiency, safety, and sustainability standards. Impacts of population growth on global environmental problems. Alternative energy use patterns and their impact on energy markets and global environmental health. (002671)

International Finance and Trade Policy
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 103 or instructor permission.

A study on the theory of international finance and trade. In-depth analysis of what determines trade flows, gains from trade, and the international flow of capital and technology. Focus on international trade policies and institutions and a survey of current trade problems and conflicts. (002672)

The Developing Countries
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 103.

This course surveys theoretical approaches and policy options to the problems of development and underdevelopment in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Agricultural transformations, industrial development, balance of payments problems, the role of foreign aid, direct foreign investment, the economic role of international institutions such as the World Bank, and other related topics are included in this course. (002673)

Economics of the Pacific Rim
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102 or faculty permission.

A survey and analysis of economic development in the Pacific Rim and its linkages with politics, history, society, and foreign policy. Topics covered include trade, tariffs, subsidies, balance of payments, savings, investment, government deficits, environment, agricultural economics, and economic growth. (002674)

Internship in Economics
1.0-6.0 Fa/Spr

This course is an internship offered for 1.0-6.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Field experience in working with economic data designed to complement the theoretical classroom curriculum and to give students work experience related to their studies. Placements are limited, so students must be screened. Units are dependent upon the number of hours in the field. May be repeated up to a maximum of 15 units. No more than 3 units can be counted toward 300-level Economics major requirement. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 15.0 units. (002677)

Special Problems
1.0-3.0 Fa/Spr

This course is an independent study offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. Credit/no credit grading only. (002680)

The History of Economic Thought
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301.

Survey of the development of economic philosophy and its relevance to social and political development and issues. (May not be counted for credit toward a major in Economics if ECON 305 is used.) (002683)

The History of Economic Thought - Honors
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301, acceptance into the Honors in the Major Program.

Survey of the development of economic philosophy and its relevance to social and political development and issues. (May not be counted for credit toward a major in Economics if ECON 305 is used.) Honors students enrolled in this course are held to more rigorous standards and expectations in both reading and writing assignments than student in ECON 410. (020734)

Marxist Economic Theory
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301.

An analysis of the economic theories of Karl Marx and Marxist economists with an emphasis on how these theories relate to economic conflicts, crises, and transformations; contrasts to orthodox economic ideas and theories; analysis of 20th century economic problems, and prospects for the future. (002685)

Theory of Money
3.0 Spring

Prerequisites: ECON 302.

A survey course of monetary theories. The role of money in general equilibrium and exchange theory. Money in the classical system. Keynes' theory of money. Monetarism. (002688)

Theory of Money - Honors
3.0 Spring

Prerequisites: ECON 302, acceptance into the Honors in the Major Program.

A survey course of monetary theories. The role of money in general equilibrium and exchange theory. Money in the classical system. Keynes' theory of money. Monetarism. Honors student enrolled in this class are held to more rigorous standards and expectations in both reading and writing assignments than students in ECON 431. (020735)

Public Finance: Theory and Policy
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301.

Emphasizes fiscal functions (e.g., resource allocation and income distribution) rather than fiscal institutions, rationale for the existence of the public sector treated both historically and theoretically, taxing and expenditure policies and procedures, with applied research on current topics. (002689)

Public Finance: Theory and Policy - Honors
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301, acceptance into the Honors in the Major Program.

Emphasizes fiscal functions (e.g., resource allocation and income distribution rather than fiscal institutions, rationale for the existence of the public sector treated both historically and theoretically, taxing and expenditure policies and procedures, with applied research on current topics. Honors students enrolled in this class are held to more rigorous standards and expectations in both reading and writing assignments than students in ECON 435. (020736)

Labor Economics
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301.

A study of labor movement theory in a historical and philosophical framework. (002690)

Industrial Organization
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301.

The structure, conduct, and performance of American industry and its relationship to oligopoly theory. Economic evaluation of antitrust laws and their enforcement. In-depth analysis of specific U.S. industries. (002691)

Industrial Organization - Honors
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301, acceptance into the Honors in the Major Program.

The structure, conduct, and performance of American industry and its relationship to oligopoly theory. Economic evaluation of antitrust laws and their enforcement. In-depth analysis of specific U.S. industries. Honors students enrolled in this class are held to more rigorous standards and expectations in both reading and writing assignments than students in ECON 450. (020737)

Urban-Regional Economics
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301 or faculty permission.

Theory of location of economic activities. Land use. Systems of cities and regions. Regional structure and growth. Spatial aspects of urban areas and urban problems. (002694)

Urgan-Regional Economics - Honors
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301, faculty permission, acceptance into the Honors in the Major Program.

Theory of location of economic activities. Land use. Systems of cities and regions. Regional structure and growth. Spatial aspects of urban areas and urban problems. Honors students enrolled in this class are held to more rigorous standards and expectations in both reading and writing assignments than students in ECON 462. (020738)

Economics of Energy
3.0 Spring

Prerequisites: ECON 301.

An analysis of petroleum markets and the likely trend in prices. Alternatives to petroleum and increasing dependence on OPEC, including conservation technologies, efficiency improvements in conventional energy production, and the potential for expanded use of renewable energy resources. Public utility deregulation and the impact on the efficient use of energy. (002695)

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 365.

Economic theory and policy concerning optimization of resource use and pollution abatement. Incentive systems for generating optimum pollution abatement. Efficiency, safety, and sustainability standards as criteria defining the appropriate level of environmental preservation. Economically efficient rates of consumption for renewable and non-renewable resources. Case studies in resource exploitation assessing whether current use rates deviate from the optimum. (002696)

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics - Honors
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301, ECON 365, acceptance into the Honors in the Major Program.

Economic theory and policy concerning optimization of resource use and pollution abatement. Incentive systems for generating optimum pollution abatement. Efficiency, safety, and sustainability standards as criteria defining the appropriate level of environmental preservation. Economically efficient rates of consumption for renewable and non-renewable resources. Case studies in resource exploitation assessing whether current use rates deviate from the optimum. Honors students enrolled in this class are held to more rigorous standards and expectations in both reading and writing assignments than students in ECON 466. (020739)

International Economics
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301, ECON 370.

Economic problems arising out of economic relations and interactions among nations. Current theory of international trade, capital flows, and finance. International economic institutions and their relationship to American foreign policy. (002697)

International Economics - Honors
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301, ECON 370, acceptance into the Honors in the Major Program.

Economic problems arising out of economic relations and interactions among nations. Current theory of international trade, capital flows, and finance. International economic institutions and their relationship to American foreign policy. Honors students enrolled in this class are held to more rigorous standards and expectations in both reading and writing assignments than students in ECON 470. (020740)

Introductory Econometrics
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 301, ECON 302.

Use of mathematics and statistics to design and test econometric models. (002699)

Introductory Econometrics - Honors
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: Econ 301, ECON 302, acceptance into the Honors in the Major Program.

Use of mathematics and statistics to design and test econometric models. Honors students enrolled in this class are held to more rigorous standards and expectations in both reading and writing assignments than students in ECON 481. (020741)

Economic Forecasting
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 302.

Survey of methods of economic forecasting, including leading indicators, surveys, time series, and regression. (002701)

Economic Forecasting - Honors
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 302, acceptance into the Honors in the Major Program.

Survey of methods of economic forecasting, including leading indicators, surveys, time series, and regression. Honors students enrolled in this class are held to more rigorous standards and expectations in both reading and writing assignments than students in ECON 483. (020742)

Economic Education
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102.

An applied analysis of economic concepts relevant to economic educators. Topics include scarcity, economic systems, supply and demand, decision-making, market structure, externalities, public goods, productivity, income distribution, gross national product, inflation, unemployment, banking, macroeconomic policy, and international economics. This course is a combination of theory and resource material. (Will not count toward the Economics major.) (002703)

Economic Literature
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, ECON 102, ECON 103, ECON 301, ECON 302, and senior status.

Students review selected economic literature and complete written assignments that relate readings to their area of interest in economics. Class meetings provide opportunities for constructive critiques from the instructor, feedback from other students, in-class writing, and oral presentations. The course is also used for program assessment. Honors in the Major students can substitute ECON 499H for ECON 495. This is a writing proficiency, WP, course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (002704)

Proseminar in Economics
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: Faculty permission.

(002705)

Special Topics in Economics
1.0-3.0 Fa/Spr

This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered. (002721)

Honors Independent Study in Economics
3.0 Fa/Spr

Prerequisites: Admission to Honors in Economics Program, ENGL 130 (or its equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher, ECON 301 or ECON 302, permission of instructor.

As part of the 400-level economics courses used for admission to the honors program, students undertake a research project on a topic approved by the course and honors instructors. In ECON 499H, students complete the project undertaken in the first semester and meet all course requirements for ECON 499H, including a public presentation of their research. Because ECON 499H is a writing proficiency course, students completing this course with a B or better are not required to take ECON 495. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 6.0 units. This is a writing proficiency, WP, course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. (002723)