College of Communication & Education

Indicators of Success

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The Department of Kinesiology offers three degree programs: BA in Kinesiology (430 students), BS in Exercise Physiology (476 students), and an MA in Kinesiology (40 students). All three degree programs were fully affirmed in fall 2017 through our 5-year Academic Program Review (APR) process. Ten years ago, we enrolled roughly 400 students. The interest in wellness in recent years has resulted in greater demand for Kinesiology careers and thus enrollment has climbed to over 900 students presently.

American Kinesiology Association Logo

The Department of Kinesiology is a member of the American Kinesiology Association whose mission is to promote and enhance kinesiology as a unified field of study and advance its many applications. AKA does this by advocating for kinesiology at national and international levels as well as by supporting its member departments by providing resource materials and leadership and educational opportunities for university administrators in kinesiology.

KINE faculty put students at the center of everything we do including our scholarship. In the last 5 years, students have accompanied faculty to present at conferences all over the Unites States as well as Australia, Taiwan, and France. We have five active students clubs and our students also work collaboratively with the campus FitU program, which is a student-run peer mentoring program.

Students in the Kinesiology Department have been recipients of many awards. Most recently, Ty Bradford received the President’s Award for Academic Excellence and Isaiah Dargan received the Scholar Athlete Award.

Photo of Ty Bradford and President Hutchinson

Photo of Isaiah Dargan

Ty Bradford with President Hutchinson – President’s Award for Academic Excellence, Spring 2017

Isaiah Dargan – Scholar Athlete Award, Spring 2017

We prepare students for careers in physical therapy (and related medical fields), teaching physical education, coaching, personal training, and other wellness-related areas. We maintain state-of-the-art labs in Exercise Physiology, Biomechanics, Pedagogy, and Strength & Conditioning. To inform our teaching, each year the department collects data on the extent to which students meet our six Student Learning Outcomes (this past year, we measured verbal and non-verbal communication). Below are summarized results from these reports.

Students participating in an Exercise Physiology Oxygen Lab

KINE 323 – Exercise Physiology Oxygen Lab

Program Performance

There are six SLOs assessed in the program.

  1. Content Knowledge – Students will demonstrate knowledge and disciplinary concepts related to the field of Kinesiology
  2. Communication – Students will apply knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to enhance learning and engagement in physical activity
  3. Reflection and Critical Thinking – Students will demonstrate reflection and critical thinking in order to refine professional practice.
  4. Programming and Assessment – Students will demonstrate evidence-based knowledge and skills (and best practices) for assessing client/student needs and for designing, implementing and evaluating programs.
  5. Professionalism and Ethics – Students will demonstrate professional behaviors, including commitment to excellence, valuing diversity and collaboration, service to others, and techniques for lifelong learning.
  6. Value Physical Activity and Fitness – Students will articulate a philosophy that physical activity programs are important to health and well-being of individuals, and that physical activity can foster self-expression, development, and learning.

Program Assessment

Which SLO or SLOs assessed each year is decided by the Kinesiology Assessment Coordinator in consultation with the core faculty. In the previous five years, 4 of the six SLOs have been assessed (#2 – Communication and #4 – Programming and Assessment being the SLO not assessed, although both are scheduled to be assessed in the 2016/17 review cycle). Exhibit A illustrates the assessment schedule of the last few years.

It should be noted the program used to conduct exit interviews with every single graduating major in the spring semester. Since the Kinesiology now has the 7 th and 8th largest majors on campus , coupled with a dramatic decrease in tenure track faculty, it became no longer feasible to interview these students. While it is unfortunate that Kinesiology is no longer able to have a closing interview with its graduates, due to the high workload, it simply is no longer tenable.

Evidentiary Exhibit A - Calendar for Assessment of Kinesiology SLOs

Sem/ Year

SLO

Course(s)/Participants

Assessment Method

F13

#1 Content Knowledge

  • KINE 322 – Biomechanics
Biomechanics Concept Inventory (BCI3): 2 different sections of KINE 322 completed a pre- and post-test given during the first and last two weeks of the sessions to measure student learning in six competency areas:
  • Basic muscular anatomical concepts (MAC)
  • Algebra and graph reading skills (ALG)
  • Neuromuscular function concept (NFC)
  • Kinematics (KIM)
  • Kinetics (KIN)
  • Fluid mechanics and application skills (FLA)

F13 -             Sp14

#3 Reflection and Critical Thinking

  • KINE 482 – Exercise Pathophysiology
  • KINE 324 – Ex Phys: Metabolism
  • KINE 524 – Biomechanical Analysis
  • KINE 322 – Biomechanics
  • KINE 323 – Physiology of Exercise

 

Critical Thinking Rubric’:

  • KINE 482, an embedded exam question on insulin signaling. (N=116)
  • KINE 324, an embedded exam question on McCardle’s Syndrome enzyme effect (N=113).
  • Four different sections of KINE 524 with two different instructors, students’ research projects that required an analysis of results incorporating relevant literature. (N=26)
  • KINE 322, embedded questions in lab assignments. (N=52)
  • KINE 323, a 20-page evidence-based literature review assignment. (N=49)

 

*Sp16

#5 Professionalism and Ethics

  • All current KINE BS students (N=138). A total of students responded (response rate of 20%).
  • KINE Professionalism Survey’: The survey was developed and refined by the department’s faculty and administered via the Office of Institutional Research.

*F15-  Sp16

#5 Professionalism and Ethics

  • KINE 480 – Ex Testing and Prescription
  • KINE 524 – Biomechanical Analysis
  • KINE 530 – Adv. Strength & Conditioning
  • Peer Coaching Checklist’  were completed in KINE 530 (2 sections; Spring 16 (N=34) .
  • KINE Disposition Rubric were completed (self and instructor) in KINE 524 (3 sections; Spring 16) (N=39).
  • Client Assessment Checklistcompleted in KINE 480 Lab (3 sections; Fall 15) (N=47)

Sp15

 

#6 Value Physical Activity and Fitness

  • All current KINE BS students (N=460) in Exercise Physiology. A total of 265 students responded (response rate of 58%)
  • Physical Activity Values & Behaviors Survey’ Student responses were assessed using an electronic survey. The survey was developed and refined by the department’s faculty and administered via SurveyMonkey.

Evidentiary Exhibit – 2.3b Selected Assessment Results

SLO #1 (Fall 2013) -  Results from the Biomechanics Concept Inventory (BCI3)*

Results - Paired t-test indicated that students in these introductory biomechanics classes exhibited a significant improvement (p < 0.01; 23% more from the pre-test) in the mastery of biomechanical concepts on the BCI3.

Strengths - students demonstrated significant learning progress on neuromuscular and kinetics competencies

Areas of Improvement - students performed consistently from pre- to post-tests on basic muscular anatomical concepts, algebra skills, and graph reading skills. The lack of improvement in these areas could also be related to the fact these areas may not have been the focus of the instructors’ curriculum.

 

n = 51

Basic muscular anatomical concepts

Algebra and graph reading skills

Neuromuscular function concept

Kinematics

Kinetics

Fluid mechanics and application skills

Pre-Test

49.4%

52.0%

32.7%

38.4%

22.7%

36.7%

 

Post-Test

51.5%

48.6%

41.1%

43.1%

44.9%

41.8%

 

P-value

0.43

0.22

<.01

0.09

<.01

0.06

 

 *For full results (Published paper by CSUC Hsieh, Mache, & Knudson, 2014)

SLO #3 (Fall 13 - Spring 14) - Results from Reflective Writing/Thinking Rubric & Critical Thinking Rubric

1) KINE 482 (FA13 and SP14) embedded exam question on insulin signaling based on the Critical Thinking Rubric (the numbers in each cell represent the total number of students scoring in that category). 68 students enrolled in FA13 and 48 students enrolled in SP14. This table represents the number of students scoring in each category along with mean and standard deviation.

 

 

Competent

Developing           

Unsatisfactory

FA13

SP14

FA13

SP14

FA13

SP14

Overall Reasoning

47

39

17

4

4

5

Information Relevancy

46

39

18

4

4

5

General Analysis

47

39

17

4

4

5

2) KINE 324 (FA13 and SP14) embedded exam question on McCardle’s Syndrome based on the Critical Thinking Rubric (the numbers in each cell represent the total number of students scoring in that category). 58 students enrolled in FA13 and 55 students enrolled in SP14.

 

 

Competent

Developing

Unsatisfactory

FA13

SP14

FA13

SP14

FA13

SP14

Overall Reasoning

19

22

19

6

20

27

Information Relevancy

18

22

20

6

20

27

General Analysis

18

22

20

6

20

27

3) KINE 524-01 (FA13 and SP14) article critique scores based on the Critical Thinking Rubric (the numbers in each cell represent the total number of students scoring in that category). 27 students enrolled in FA13 and 32 students enrolled in SP14.

 

Competent

FA13             SP14

Developing

FA13            SP14

Unsatisfactory

FA13            SP14

Overall Reasoning

7

1

16

20

4

11

Credibility Evaluation

7

2

14

20

6

10

Information Relevancy

6

4

15

12

6

16

General Analysis

8

2

14

18

5

12

4)KINE 524-03 (FA13 and SP14) article critique scores based on the Critical Thinking Rubric (the numbers in each cell represent the total number of students scoring in that category). 13 students enrolled in FA13 and 13 students enrolled in SP14.

 

Competent

FA13             SP14

Developing

FA13            SP14

Unsatisfactory

FA13            SP14

Overall Reasoning

5

4

5

6

2

3

Credibility Evaluation

4

7

6

6

3

0

Information Relevancy

3

2

8

9

2

2

General Analysis

5

3

6

9

2

1

5) KINE 322 (FA13 and SP14) scores from embedded questions in a lab assignment based on the Critical Thinking Rubric (the numbers in each cell represent the total number of students scoring in that category). 27 students enrolled in FA13 and 25 students enrolled in SP14.

 

Competent

FA13             SP14

Developing

FA13            SP14

Unsatisfactory

FA13            SP14

Overall Reasoning

6

5

15

13

6

7

Credibility Evaluation

5

4

19

12

4

9

Information Relevancy

7

5

12

11

9

9

General Analysis

6

4

15

15

6

6

 6) KINE 323 (SP14) 20 page evidence-based literature review based on the Critical Thinking Rubric (the numbers in each cell represent the total number of students scoring in that category). Data are only available for SP14 where 49 students were enrolled.

 

Competent

SP14

Developing

SP14

Unsatisfactory

SP14

Overall Reasoning

35

9

5

Credibility Evaluation

37

5

7

Information Relevancy

37

5

7

General Analysis

35

9

5

SLO #5 (F15/Sp16) -  KINE 489 ‘Internship Supervisor Assessment’ Results

Criteria

F15/Sp16 (N=45)

 

Always

Often

Rarely

Sometimes

NA

Respectful to Others

91.1%

8.9%

0%

0%

0%

Behaves Professionally

82.2%

17.8%

0%

0%

0%

Communicates in a Way that Strengthens the Workplace

66.7%

15.6%

2.2%

15.6%

0%

Collaborates Well With Others

77.8%

13.3%

0%

6.7%

2.2%

Produces High Quality Work

64.5%

26.7%

0%

2.1%

6.7%

Committed to Lifelong Learning

82.2%

15.6%

0%

0%

2.2%

Values Diversity in the Workplace

88.9%

6.7%

0%

0%

4.4%

Committed to Excellence

82.2%

15.6%

0%

0%

2.2%

Punctual

84.4%

8.9%

6.7%

0%

0%

Consistently Engaged and Task Focuses

80.1%

13.3%

2.2%

4.4%

0%

Demonstrates Initiative

71.1%

15.6%

2.2%

11.1%

0%

Works Productively in the Absence of Supervision

66.7%

17.8%

2.2%

4.4%

8.9%

SLO #5 (Spring 2016) - ‘KINE Professionalism Survey’ Selected Results (N=138)

Certifications/Conferences Attended/Student Club & Service Engagement

Certifications

%

Conferences Attended

%

First Aid

39.6%

CAHPERD

2.2%

CPR

35.1%

National Adapted Physical Education

.7%

AED

25.4%

ACSM

0%

Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist

1.5%

Southwest ACSM

0%

ACE - Personal Trainer

.7%

SHAPE/AAHPERD

1.5%

NASM  - Personal Trainer

0%

Biomechanics in Sports

.7%

ISSA  - Personal Trainer

0%

NSCA

0%

ACSM  - Personal Trainer

0%

Applied Sports Psychology

0%

ACSM Group Exercise Instructor

0%

Other

5.2%

ACSM Exercise Physiologist

0%

ACSM Exercise Physiologist

0%

 

Student Club/Service Engagement

%

Exercise Physiology Club

11.9%

Pre-Physical Therapy Society

11.9%

PETE Club

4.5%

Strength & Conditioning Club

3%

Dance Sports Club

2.2%

CAVE – Community Action Volunteers in Education

17.9%

Self-Report of Professional Behaviors (N=138)

Professional Behavior:

I consistently….

None

Completely False

Somewhat False

Slightly False

Slightly True

Somewhat True

Completely True

Use appropriate Language

26.1%

0%

0%

3%

2.2%

25.4%

46.3%

Wear professional Attire

26.1%

1.5%

0%

7.5%

13.4%

20.9%

30.6%

Engage in Collaborative Behaviors

27.6%

0%

.7%

.7%

3%

20.9%

47%

Am Well Prepared

26.1%

0%

.7%

1.5%

3.7%

26.9%

41%

Put for Effort

26.9%

0%

0%

0%

.7%

13.4%

59%

Take Initiative

26.1%

0%

0%

1.5%

7.5%

32.1%

32.8%

Am Helping/Caring

26.9%

0%

0%

.7%

2.2%

16.4%

53.7%

Am Committed to Excellence

26.1%

0%

0%

0%

3%

17.9%

53%

Am a Lifelong Learner

26.1%

.7%

0%

0%

1.5%

11.9%

59.7%

 SLO #6 (Spring 2015) - Physical Activity Values & Behaviors Survey

Percent of Students Achieving

  • 94% agreed or strongly agreed that they value physical activity
  • 83% stated that physical activity programs are important to health and well-being of individuals
  • 58% engage in moderate physical activity at least 5 days/week
  • 77% engage in muscle strengthening activities at least 2 days/week.
  • 64% engage in vigorous aerobic activity at least 3 days/week
  • On the 6-point scale, most indicated  positive feelings about physical activity including 70% who reported  they felt “confident in my ability to perform physical activities that personally challenged me”

Reflective Comments

Assessment in the BS Exercise Physiology Program is an ongoing process. In addition to participating in the five-year cycle for assessing each of our learning outcomes, many Kinesiology faculty seek anonymous feedback in their classes to learn more about the effectiveness of various aspects of their courses. These formal and informal methods provide on-going checks on the quality of our courses and program. At our department meetings, discussions often focus on a variety of assessment issues, including student learning objectives selected for the year, coordination among courses, and ideas for improving the curriculum in response to assessment results.

As a department, we are seriously committed to continuing our discussions about “closing the loop” around the lessons we learn through assessment. As an overall objective of offering the best possible program to our students, we recognize that the program must change over time. With the philosophy of offering our students a living curriculum that best meets their needs, we also recognize that student learning objectives must also evolve over time.

The 2010-2015 assessment cycle was successfully implemented as planned. Due to administrative changes, however, assessment data for years 2010-2012 were unavailable. Therefore, no data for SLO #2 or #4 are reported. These SLO’s will be the focus of the 2016-17 review cycle.

A number of noteworthy changes to the program occurred as a result:

SLO #1

Result: students demonstrated significant learning progress on neuromuscular and kinetics competencies. Anatomical concepts, algebra skills, and graph reading skills require more attention.

Changes: Specifically, KINE will review the prerequisite for KINE 322 Biomechanics to determine if current expectations (Biology 103 ‘Human Anatomy’) are sufficient.  Further, Biomechanics professors have begun to make these areas of deficiency a more concerted focus in the overall curriculum.

SLO #3

Results: The data indicate the vast majority of students are either competent or appropriately developing their skills in reflection and critical thinking.

Changes: Embedded exam questions on which students performed poorly should be examined to determine if (a) the questions are placed in the appropriate upper division course and (b) if there is way to better prepare them for this level of critical analysis. Many students are performing well so we also need to determine what pedagogical methods being implemented are clearly effective.

SLO #5

Results: Interns scored high on nearly all categories. Specifically, supervisors rated interns highest on the category of respect (91.1% always), followed by valuing diversity (88.9% always, and punctual (84.4% always). The lowest ranked categories were produces high quality work (64.5%), works productively in absence of supervision (66.7%), and communication (66.7%).

Changes: Though students were rated high on many of the categories, room for improvement certainly exists. In particular, the Exercise Physiology Program may wish to make expectations more explicit to students prior to beginning the internships. This could be conveyed via a handbook or in a series of classroom meetings. Additionally, the department may choose to implement a mid-semester assessment to solicit supervisor feedback; this would allow for intervention if needed.

SLO #6

Results: The data indicate that the vast majority of students value physical activity, which is encouraging since that is a key departmental SLO. Interestingly, however, the data indicate that fewer students actually are physically active compared to those who simply value physical activity.

 

Changes: KINE has started to address this is by “preaching” the importance of daily physical activity to freshman and transfer students during summer orientation advising sessions. This includes emphasizing their “obligation” as KINE majors to be physically active, to talk with professors about physically active opportunities in the community, and to not take the elevator whenever possible. The four student clubs in our department have introduced more physically active meetings including Pickleball tournaments and Strength & Conditioning seminars. Note: KINE Faculty have also discussed medication of the current SLO #6 or an additional SLO to address this.