College of Communication & Education

Indicators of Success

HomeMission | Goals & Objectives | Learning Outcomes | Curriculum Matrix | Assessment Plan | Indicators of Success

The Graduate Program in Kinesiology has a distinguished 50-year history at California State University, Chico. Kinesiology is a vibrant graduate program that provides a high quality learning environment, serving northern California and beyond. Our graduates fill the need for teachers, coaches, health professionals, and community recreation leaders. Recent graduates have gone on to medical schools, physician assistant programs, physical therapy programs, occupational health programs, and prestigious PhD granting universities. This self-study report presents strong evidence to illustrate the ongoing commitment of our faculty in the Department of Kinesiology to providing graduate students with the best possible experience and professional training. The graduate program is an essential part of the Kinesiology Department and serves a vital need in the North State.

American Kinesiology Association Logo

The Department of Kinesiology is a member of the American Kinesiology Association whose mission is to promote and enhance kinesiology as a unified field of study and advance its many applications. AKA does this by advocating for kinesiology at national and international levels as well as by supporting its member departments by providing resource materials and leadership and educational opportunities for university administrators in kinesiology.

 Photo of KINE MA Graduating Class

Kinesiology Master’ of Arts Graduating Class

Program Performance

The program has established processes for assessing student-learning outcomes and for assuring that students are achieving core competencies for completion of the program. Upon completion of the Master's degree in Kinesiology at Chico State, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic principles and an understanding of the current research in the field of Kinesiology;
  2. Apply critical thinking, writing, reading, oral communication, quantitative and qualitative analysis, and information management skills to movement-related questions;
  3. Understand the scientific method and other systematic ways of knowing relative to research and scholarship in human movement;
  4. Develop a sense of responsibility to and for the profession and be professionally involved at the local, state and/or regional levels;
  5. Be prepared to engage in informed dialogue with diverse professional and lay communities regarding kinesiology principles and practices.

Student and Faculty Awards

Students and Faculty in the Kinesiology Master of Arts Program have been recipients of many awards. Recently, Brian Ellis received the Lt. Robert Merton Rawlins Merit Award, and Dr. Cathrine Himberg won the Outstanding Faculty Award.

Photo of Rawlins Merit Award Winner Brian EllisPhoto of 2015 Outstanding Professor Catherine Himberg

Brian Ellis

College of Communication & Education
Master’s: Kinesiology, Class of 2016
BS: Exercise Physiology, Class of 2014

Nominated by: Kevin Patton

Brian is a graduate student pursuing his master’s degree in kinesiology. During his time on campus, Brian started the collegiate disc golf team and for three years in a row qualified to participate at the National Collegiate Disc Golf Championships in North Augusta, South Carolina. He also served as the kinesiology physical activity instructor and the event planner for the Wildcat Strength and Conditioning Club. In addition to his extensive extracurricular activities, Brian has also maintained excellent academic standing. Brian’s aspiration is to enroll into a doctorate program after graduating from CSU, Chico

Kinesiology Professor Cathrine Himberg’s 2014 advocacy film “No Excuses” delivers a bold message to policy makers and school officials: Implementing quality K-12 physical education in this country should be a major priority. The documentary is so persuasive that First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move! Active Schools” campaign is using it to promote children’s health.

Himberg’s contributions to her field are astounding. As coordinator of CSU, Chico’s Physical Education Teacher Education Program since 2000, she has advised thousands of budding teachers. An advocate for quality physical education, she founded the Center for Advancement of Standards-based Physical Education Reform (CASPER) and the website www.supportREALteachers.org, which is used by teachers around the globe as a curriculum resource. CASPER’s early advocacy efforts resulted in national media attention and a National Association for Sport and Physical Education Presidential Citation in 2005.

Selected Recent Kinesiology MA Graduates – Current Employment

2015

  • Negin Razi – Doctoral Student – Community Health/Pedagogy – University of British Columbia
  • Jenny Barker – Doctoral Student - Exercise Physiology – Arizona State University
  • John Brunk – CSU Chico Assistant Women's Track & Field Coach (High Jump, Multi Events)
  • Becka Shaver - Corps Member at Teach for America; Los Angeles, CA
  • Maria Woodruff - Strength and Conditioning Coach; Sierra Strength and Speed; Reno, NV
  • Elissa Bestreich – APE Specialist – Roslyn Union School District – Roslyn, NY
  • Sean Brown – Kinesiologist – Shriner’s Hospital for Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA
  • Scott Light – Performance Specialist – EXOS (Athletes’ Performance and Core Performance – Portland, OR
  • Kristi Dunn – Athletic Trainer – Central Valley High School – Corvallis, OR

2014

  • Scott Amick – General Manager – Fresh-Local-Healthy – Chico, CA
  • Kayla Sowinski - Coach – Sparta Science – Strength and Conditioning – Menlo Park, CA.
  • Amanda Clifford - Health Fitness Specialist - Google; Mountain View, CA
  • JaNae McLaughlin – Part Time Faculty – CSU Chico – Kinesiology
  • Konrad Dahl - Strength coach/personal trainer In-Shape Health Club; Napa CA
  • Celeste Harrington – Fitness Specialist – Apple; Cupertino, CA
  • Christopher Kokoll - Director of Sports Performance at AthletiCare; Las Vegas, Nevada
  • Emily Schaefer – Assistant Coach Notre Dame de Namur Univ. Women's Basketball – Belmont, CA
  • Zachery Wales - Instructor and Track & Field Throws Coach; Cuesta College – San Luis Obispo, CA
  • Kyler Leventin – Fitness Manager – 24 Hour Fitness – San Diego, CA.
  • Sara Marcia – Special Education Teacher – Marin County School District

2013

  • Jennifer Ogren – Assistant Women’s Soccer Coach – University of South Dakota
  • Zook Richardson – Pitching Coach - Shasta College Baseball Team
  • Nicole Crowe – Adapted Physical Education – Livermore Joint Unified School District
  • Kavan Shah – Physical Therapist – Victorville, CA.
  • Eric Wright – Track and Field Throws Coach – College of the Redwoods; Eureka, CA
  • Matt Wahlund - Surgical Device Consultant at Pacific Medical, Inc. Bend Oregon.
  • Elisabeth Schirmers – Rhythmix Dance Company, Chico, CA.

2012

  • Brian Beeman – Associate Head Coach Track and Field – Colorado Mesa Univ. – Grand Junction, CO
  • Julio Jimenez – Head Coach – Cross Country – Long Beach City College
  • Daniel Louie – Instructor/Trainer – Fitness Urbano – San Francisco, CA
  • Garrett Rieck - Adjunct Faculty and Asst. Baseball Coach at Los Angeles Valley College
  • Krista Winkler – Learning Specialist at Robert Louis Stevenson School; Pebble Beach, CA
  • Cameron Kisst – Adjunct Faculty Instructor; Gurnick Academy of Medical Arts. San Mateo, CA.

2011

  • Martin Frigaard - Data Scientist – Kidney Health Research Collaborative; UCSF Nephrology – Department of Medicine
  • Matt Quijano MA, ATC Head Athletic Trainer: Arroyo Grande High School, Arroyo Grande, CA
  • Patrick Cottini – Director of Operations – Chico Community Wheelchair Sports/Recreation Program
  • Matthew Schubert – Assistant Professor - Dept. of Kinesiology - Auburn University Montgomery, AL

Program Assessment

Our program assessment plan charges us with reviewing at least one SLO per year, assuring that we will regularly review all five SLOs before a five-year review. After completing the most recent round of internal self-assessment in 2015/16, the Mission Statement and Goals were deemed suitable.

Assessment data is used to monitor student progress and ways to improve our graduate seminars, as well as toward our overall mission and goals to make sure that all of these various aspects are well integrated for a successfully run graduate program.

Evidentiary Exhibit – Calendar for Assessment of Kinesiology SLOs

Student Learning Objectives

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic principles and an understanding of the current research in the
    field of Kinesiology.
  2. Apply critical thinking, writing, reading, oral communication, quantitative and qualitative analysis and information management skills to movement-related questions.
  3. Understand the scientific method and other systematic ways of knowing relative to research and scholarship in human movement.
  4. Develop a sense of responsibility to and for the profession and be professionally involved at the local, state and/or regional levels.
  5. Be prepared to engage in informed dialogue with diverse professional and lay communities regarding kinesiology principles and practices.

Sem/Year

SLO

Course(s)/Experiences

Assessment Method

2012-2015

#1, #2, #3, #4, #5

KINE MA students (N=51). A total of 29 students responded (response rate of 57%)

‘Alumni Survey’: Responses were assessed using an electronic survey. The survey was developed and refined by the department’s graduate committee and administered via Qualtrics.

2013-2014

#1, #2, #3, #5

KINE MA students (N=17). Student performance on three sections of the (reading and understanding research, research statistics, research methods). All students who took the exam in the Fall 2013 (N=3) and Spring 2014 (N=14); total is 17 students for the 2013/2014 academic year.

‘Comprehensive Exam’: Exam portions (total of 4) were independently assessed by at least two tenure track faculty (see rubrics in appendices). All rubrics were developed and refined by the department’s graduate committee.

  • 12 Step Research Article Rubric
  • Research Statistics Rubric
  • Research Methods Rubric
  • Written Content Rubric

2014-2015

 

#4

All current KINE MA students (N=45). A total of 35 students responded (response rate of 78%).

Physical Activity Values & Behaviors Survey’: The survey was developed and refined by the department’s faculty and administered via SurveyMonkey.

2015-2016

#4, #5

  • KINE 600 (Fall 15) (N=13)
  • All graduating master’s students (F15/Sp16) (N=16). 
  • ‘KINE Disposition Rubric’: The rubric (see appendices) was developed and refined by the department’s graduate faculty committee and assesses: Engagement/Professionalism, Effort, Initiative, and Helping/Caring.
  • KINE 600 (F15) student dispositions were assessed by: a) the class instructor, and b) self-assessed by students.
  • Graduating students’ (Sp16) dispositions were assessed by: a) their committee chair, and b) self-assessed by students.

2015-2016

#4, #5

All current KINE MA students (N=44). A total of 25 students responded (response rate of 57%).

‘KINE Professionalism Survey’: The survey was developed and refined by the department’s faculty and administered via the Office of Institutional Research.

Evidentiary Exhibit – Selected Assessment Results

SLOs #1-#5 (2012-2015) - Responses from KINE Alumni Survey

SLO

How well did the graduate program prepare you to…

 

1-  Very Poor

2- Poor

3-   Fair

4-Good

5-  Very Good

Total Resp.

Mean

1

Demonstrate knowledge of basic principles and an understanding of the current research in the field of Kinesiology.

0

0

5

14

8

27

4.11/5

2

Apply critical thinking, writing, reading, oral communication, quantitative and qualitative analysis, and information management skills to movement-related questions.

0

0

1

16

10

27

4.33/5

3

Understand the scientific method and other systematic ways of knowing relative to research and scholarship in human movement.

0

0

8

12

7

27

3.96/5

4

Develop a sense of responsibility to and for the profession and be professionally involved at the local, state and/or regional levels.

1

0

9

11

6

27

3.78/5

5

Engage in informed dialogue with diverse professional and lay communities regarding kinesiology principles and practices.

1

0

4

15

7

27

4.00/5

SLOs #1, #2, #3, #5 (2013-2014) - Performance on Comprehensive Exam

SLO

Measure

Percent of Students Achieving

#1, #2, #3

12 Step Research Article Exam

94% [16/17] achieved acceptable performance on initial attempt

#2, #3, #5

Written Content Area Exam

94% [16/17] achieved acceptable performance on initial attempt

#2, #3

Research Statistics Exam

88% [15/17] achieved acceptable performance on initial attempt

#2, #3

Research Methods Exam 

94% [16/17] achieved acceptable performance on initial attempt

SLO #4 (2015-2016) – KINE Graduate Student Dispositions

KINE 600 - Overall Average Scores Fall 2015 –– Rated by Instructor

 

Semester

Number of Students

Unsatisfactory (Does not Meet Expectations)

Developing (Does Not Meet Expectations)       < 3.0

Proficient (Meets Expectations)   3.1-5.9

Advanced (Exceeds Expectations)         > 6.0

Fall 2015

13

0% (0/13)

8% (1/13)

84% (11/13)

8% (1/13)

Final Semester Graduates - Overall Average Scores Spring 2016 –– Rated by Committee Chair (Comprehensive Exam or Thesis/Project)

 

Semester

Number of Students

Unsatisfactory (Does not Meet Expectations)

Developing (Does Not Meet Expectations)        < 3.9

Proficient (Meets Expectations)           4.0-5.9

Advanced (Exceeds Expectations)           = > 6.0

Spring 2016

16

0% (0/16)

6% (1/16)

69% (11/16)

25% (4/16)

KINE Graduate Student Dispositions - Mean Scores by Component

 

Program Entry

Program Completion

 

Student Disposition Component

Fall 2015 (N=13)

Self Assessment

Fall 2015 (N=13) Teacher Assessment

Spring 2016 (N=16)                 Self Assessment

Spring 2016 (N=16)          Teacher Assessment

Engagement

5.23 / 7

4.62 / 7

5.43 / 7

5.50 / 7

Effort

4.85 / 7

4.77 / 7

5.57 / 7

5.87 / 7

Initiative

5.23 / 7

4.54 / 7

5.43 / 7

5.93 / 7

Helping and Caring

5.85 / 7

4.77 / 7

5.50// 7

6.07 / 7

SLO #4, #5 (2015-2016) – KINE Professionalism Survey – Selected Results

Certifications/Conferences Attended/Student Club & Service Engagement (N=25)

Certifications

%

Conferences Attended

%

First Aid

64

CAHPERD

12

CPR

52

National Adapted Physical Education

8

AED

9

ACSM

8

Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist

8

Southwest ACSM

4

ACE - Personal Trainer

0

SHAPE/AAHPERD

8

NASM  - Personal Trainer

8

Biomechanics in Sports

0

ISSA  - Personal Trainer

0

NSCA

4

ACSM  - Personal Trainer

8

Applied Sports Psychology

12

ACSM Group Exercise Instructor

8

Other

12

ACSM Exercise Physiologist

4

ACSM Exercise Physiologist

4

 

 

Student Club/Service Engagement

%

Exercise Physiology Club

0%

Pre-Physical Therapy Society

0%

PETE Club

4%

Strength & Conditioning Club

12%

Community Action Volunteers in Education (CAVE)

28%

Self-Report of Professional Behaviors (N=25)

Professional Behavior:

I consistently….

Somewhat False

Slightly False

Slightly True

Somewhat True

Completely True

Use appropriate Language

0%

0%

0%

44%

56%

Wear professional Attire

8%

4%

20%

28%

40%

Engage in Collaborative Behaviors

0%

0%

8%

24%

68%

Am Well Prepared

0%

0%

4%

40%

56%

Put for Effort

0%

0%

4%

8%

88%

Take Initiative

0%

0%

4%

32%

64%

Am Helping/Caring

0%

0%

6%

8%

88%

Am Committed to Excellence

0%

0%

0%

24%

76%

Am a Lifelong Learner

0%

0%

0%

8%

92%

Reflective Comments

As the selection from our recent survey of alumni indicates, former students express a high degree of satisfaction with the program. Alumni would recommend the program to others and are generally satisfied with their overall education, rating achievement of SLO’s #1, #2, & #5 as the highest, closely followed by SLOs #3 and #4. Narrative comments consistently cite faculty teaching and high levels of faculty-student contact as program strengths. “Professors who genuine care about your success and education while in the program,” one student writes. Another notes that “small class size equals more attention for students - faculty became close with students creating an emotional connection with students - faculty was always available to answer questions or to provide guidance” Students also routinely praise the Teaching Associate Program and were grateful for the opportunity to teach at the college level. Similarly, students appreciated the opportunity to engage in research projects with faculty. 

Further, students indicated that the program was highly successful (rating of good to very good) in achieving SLOs: #1 81%, #2 96%, #3 70%, #4 63%, #5 81%.

Nonetheless, we know that there is room for improvement. Some factors, like the impact of the CSU budget on our course offerings, are out of our immediate control. Other areas, however, such as giving more careful thought to the variety of course offerings and the range of faculty teaching in the program, can be reviewed. In addition, while the results of the alumni survey are confirming, there are steps that can be taken. Specifically, alumni responses indicate that SLO #4 (Develop a sense of responsibility to and for the profession and be professionally involved at the local, state and/or regional levels) could and should be improved.

The 2010-2015 assessment cycle was successfully implemented as planned. 

A number of noteworthy changes to the program occurred as a result:

  1. We revised the time allotted to the research statistics and research methods comprehensive exams (2012)
  2. We identified the need for more deliberate practice of the 12 step research review methods (strategy used to read and understand a research report) (2014)
  3. We identified the need for additional learning support mechanisms for students preparing for the research statistics exam portion (comprehensive exam)
  4. We identified a need to better support current graduate students serving as TAs (lab and 1-unit activity courses) (2015)

A recent revision was made in the Fall of 2012 to the time allotted to the research statistics exam. Previously, students were allowed 1 hour to take the exam and test results indicated that performance on the last three exam questions (of 10) were poor and frequently vaguely answered. Upon examination of the historical exam data, the exam has been lengthened to 1.5 hours. Rather than removing exam content, this change has allowed students the needed time to complete all exam questions. The ultimate result has been a more accurate assessment of student knowledge in this area (without lowering the bar).

The reading and understanding research and research statistics outcomes have shown improvement over the past few years. This improvement is due to modifications of the delivery of and more deliberate practice of the 12 step method (strategy used to read and understand a research report) in KINE 600.

Additional learning support mechanisms in the way of a facilitated research statistics study group have resulted in improved test scores in the research statistics comprehensive exam.