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The Option in Operations and Supply Chain Management



Jim Sager (left), BIS Academic Achievement Award recipient Megan Parks (center) and COB Dean Judith Hennessey (right)
Jim Sager (left), BIS Academic Achievement Award recipient Megan Parks (center), Dean Judith Hennessey (right)
Overview

The Operations and Supply Chain Management (OSCM) profession continues to expand due to technological innovation, global competition and the need to increase productivity and reduce costs. Efficient, cost effective performance across the supply chain requires coordination of sourcing, logistics, production operations, inventory management, and information technology. OSCM professionals operate at the hub of an organization, interacting regularly with all other business functions in the firm - including sales and marketing, finance and human resources, and with suppliers and customers located around the globe. OSCM professionals ensure that the desired product/service is available to the customer in the right condition and quantity and at the right time, place, and cost.

As business and technology becomes increasingly sophisticated and complex, employers demand a higher level of skill and expertise. The OSCM option in the BIS program addresses this business challenge with a dynamic educational program. Many of the courses have been designed to facilitate the possibility of a student pursuing a professional certification such as the American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS) CPIM (Certified in Production and Inventory Management) or CSCP (Certified Supply Chain Professional). In addition, the OSCM program maintains an advisory board that works with faculty to keep the program current. Current advisory board members hold senior executive position at companies such as Cisco, Del Monte, Dell, Micron, Apple, Foster Farms, Intel and ChevronTexaco.


Why Study Operations and Supply Chain Management?

An Operations and Supply Chain Management (OSCM) degree provides graduates with the skills and understanding to enable them to function as, for example, Supply Chain Managers, Production Planners, Operations Managers, Quality Managers, Project Managers, Procurement Managers, Business Analysts and Management Consultants. Many graduates can expect promotion to senior management levels over the course of their careers. Employment in the OSCM area is projected to grow 22 percent from 2012 to 2022.

Presently, OSCM graduates enjoy the highest average starting salaries of all majors in the College of Business. In their 2012 survey, College.com lists the average starting salary for OSCM degree graduates as $49,400. According to Logistics Management, mid-career salaries averaged $90,000 in 2010 and OSCM professionals with a graduate degree, such as an MBA, averaged $130,000.

OSCM may be right for you if you have:

  • Attention to detail
  • Skills in analyzing situations in a structured and logical manner
  • Decision-making skills based on objective data
  • Adaptability and flexibility (open to change and willingness to adjust to changing constraints)
  • Self-confidence
  • Personal responsibility, being accountable, and
  • Leadership skills (i.e. the ability to influence, inspire and motivate others)

“Amateurs think about tactics, but professionals think about logistics.”
  -   Gen Robert H. Barrow, USMC