Chris Ivey

Department of Biological Sciences
Center for Water and the Environment

Research Interests

Dr. Ivey studies the evolution and ecology of plants and insects.  His work focuses on plant-insect interactions, the evolution of mating systems, reproductive ecology, and plant defense. His current projects include studies of genetic variation and phenotypic selection of mating system and physiological traits in Clarkia and Mimulus, identifying patterns and mechanisms of speciation in Mimulus, and testing how induced anti-herbivore defenses alter sex allocation in Mimulus guttatus.

Research Projects

PI’s: Dr. Susan Mazer, Dr. Chris Ivey
Title: Co-variation among life history traits and outcrossing rates in natural populations of Clarkia xantiana and C. unguiculata.
Funding Agency: National Science Foundation
Dates: 2011-2013
Award Amount: 25,000

Research Publications

Ivey, Christopher T. and David E. Carr. “Tests for the joint evolution of mating system and drought escape in Mimulus.” Plant Mating Systems. Spec. Issue of Annals of Botany 109: 583–598, 2012. Web. 10 August 2011.

Jeffrey D. Karron, Christopher T. Ivey, Randall J. Mitchell, Michael R. Whitehead, Rod Peakall and Andrea L. Case. “New perspectives on the evolution of plant mating systems.” Plant Mating Systems. Spec. Issue of Annals of Botany. 109: 493–503, 2012. Web. 30 December 2011.

Ivey, Christopher T. and David E. Carr. and MD Eubanks. “Genetic variation and constraints on the evolution of defense against spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius) herbivory in Mimulus guttatus.” Heredity (2009) 102, 303–311. 

Miller, Donald G., III, Christopher T. Ivey and Jackson D. Shedd. “Support for the microenvironment hypothesis for adaptive value of gall induction in the California gall wasp, Andricus quercuscalifornicus.” Entomologia Experimentaliset Applicata 132 (2009): 126–133.

Ivey, Christopher T. and David E. Carr. “Effects of Herbivory and Inbreeding On the Pollinators and Mating System of Mimulus Guttatus (Phrymaceae).” American Journal of Botany 92 (2005): 1641–1649.

Research Areas

Ecology/ Biodiversity