Fall 2015

The following are the course numbers of the classes offered through the English Department (listed within The University Catalog under ENGL). Each number will send you to a brief description of the course, when available.

130I 130PI 203 220I 240 252
258 258I 260 261 264I 276
277 278 279 320 321 327
332 333 335 338Z 340 341
342 342I 350I 353 355 364I
371 375 415 431 441 448
451 457 468 470 471 472
476 477 478

English 130I: Academic Writing

English 130I, “Academic Writing,” is a core General Education Foundation course (Area A2) that introduces you to the challenges of university level writing, reading, and critical thinking.  This course uses writing to develop your scholarly curiosity.  To do this, instructors focus on:

  • deepening your research skills,
  • developing your ability to read and respond to difficult texts, and,
  • most importantly, helping you through the writing process in a social, collaborative, revision-focused environment.

All writing-intensive GE courses require a minimum of 2,500 words, and students enrolled in English 130 or 130P must demonstrate the ability to criticize, analyze, and advocate ideas with persuasive force in writing. A grade of C- or better is needed to pass this course.

Depending on your instructor, the focus for research in English 130I varies. Your specific course may research issues in digital culture, identity, food, popular culture, or music, just to name a few of the options. The common thread among all sections is an inquiry-based approach to pursuing research questions that are interesting to students. 

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English 130PI: Academic Writing

Please note: English 130PI is not offered every semester.

English 130I, “Academic Writing,” is a core General Education Foundation course (Area A2) that introduces you to the challenges of university level writing, reading, and critical thinking.  This course uses writing to develop your scholarly curiosity.  To do this, instructors focus on:

  • deepening your research skills,
  • developing your ability to read and respond to difficult texts, and,
  • most importantly, helping you through the writing process in a social, collaborative, revision-focused environment.

All writing-intensive GE courses require a minimum of 2,500 words, and students enrolled in English 130 or 130P must demonstrate the ability to criticize, analyze, and advocate ideas with persuasive force in writing. A grade of C- or better is needed to pass this course.

Depending on your instructor, the focus for research in English 130I varies. Your specific course may research issues in digital culture, identity, food, popular culture, or music, just to name a few of the options. The common thread among all sections is an inquiry-based approach to pursuing research questions that are interesting to students. 

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English 203: Shakespeare On Film

Instructor: Erin Kelly

Shakespeare’s plays were originally performed on the public stage in Elizabethan and Jacobean London. Since then, they have been performed on stages around the world and adapted for the silver screen countless times. In English 203, we will engage with a range of film adaptations of Shakespeare’s work, exploring what Shakespeare has meant for different cultures and in different time periods. In order to aid our discussions, students will read the texts of Shakespeare’s plays as well as shorter readings on film theory and terminology. We will think about how his texts work on the page, on the stage, and on the screen. Classes will be a mixture of lectures, discussions, and film viewings.

Our readings and viewings will include Henry V (Kenneth Branagh), Much Ado About Nothing (Joss Whedon), Romeo & Juliet (Baz Luhrmann), and King Lear (Akira Kurosawa’s Ran).

This course may be taken as an elective or to fulfill the General Education arts requirement.  


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English 220I: Beginning Creative Writing

Professor: Jeanne Clark

English 220 is a General Education C-2, Writing Intensive (WI) course in the Food Pathway.  As such the course will incorporate and foster the following GE values:

 

  • Active Inquiry—a spirit of curiosity to ask questions, seek answers, contemplate, and pursue investigations with intellectual rigor, while making connections between cognitive and personal development, both inside and outside traditional instructional settings.
  • Diversity—an understanding of and facility with different intellectual viewpoints as well as the unique perspectives of others based on varied experiences, identities and social attributes.
  • Creativity— the generation of new idea and original expressions in light of past innovations, traditions, and the history of ideas, accompanied by a willingness to take intellectual risks and consider novel approaches.

 

Since English 220 is a course in the Food Pathway, you will read and analyze contemporary literature that uses food in a variety of contexts: social, cultural, historical, ideological, and of course communicative.  Many of the readings and writing assignments in the course will allow you to

 

  • discuss the many roles that food plays in our lives—as sustenance, as expression of identity, as a form of entertainment, as ritual, and as a means to bring people together into a community;
  • show how food transmits culture;
  • compare and contrast food and its social role from a variety of cultures and ethnic traditions;
  • analyze the differences and consequences of food habits cross-culturally;
  • understand the social, cultural, and historical contexts of food;
  • recognize the concept of foodways—the beliefs, behaviors, attitudes, and values involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of food;
  • articulate the role of food in constituting national, gender, and ethnic identity.

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English 240: Literature of Life

Professor: Sandra Flake 

In this course, we will read and discuss literature from various nations and cultures, with an emphasis on the relationships of these works to our lives and current events:  what can these works tell us about how different societies function, about relationships between and among people, about human behavior?  What can we learn about our own and others’ lives from what we read? Where does personal responsibility come in?  The required reading will include outstanding works of fiction, poetry and drama by American and international writers, and class will be focused primarily on discussion, with occasional quizzes and group assignments.  Students will also write responses to themes and issues raised by the reading and complete two projects.

Literature for Life is an approved General Education course in Lifelong Learning (area e), and it is included in two of the General Education Pathways in which students can complete an interdisciplinary minor:  1) Ethics, Justice, and Policy and 2) Great Books and Ideas.

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English 252: American Indian Literature

Professor: Sandra Flake

In this course, we will read and discuss works drawn from the wide range of Native American Literatures.  Our readings will range from pre-contact texts to contemporary American Indian writing. We will consider both oral and written texts, drawn from a variety of genres including songs, chants, stories, autobiography, film, novels and poetry.  In addition, this course will help to develop an understanding of the critical concerns raised by cross-cultural reading.  Although our orientation will be primarily literary, we will also weave cultural, historical, political, ecological and spiritual dimensions into our discussions. Classes will include discussion, some lecture, some oral reading, with occasional quizzes and group work.  You will write some brief responses to the reading and complete projects/papers and exams.        

American Indian Literatures is an approved General Education course in Humanities (area c-2), and it is included in one of the General Education Pathways in which students can complete an interdisciplinary minor, Sustainability Studies.

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English 258: World Literature

Professor: Rob Burton

English 258 uses various technology tools (such as Blogs and PowerPoints) as a way of encouraging students to discuss and write about contemporary world authors such as Kukrit Pramoj (Thailand) and Nawal el Saadawi (Egypt). It is a Writing Intensive (WI) course in the Global Development Pathway (Area C-2). 

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English 258I: World Literature

Professor: Rob Burton

English 258 uses various technology tools (such as Blogs and PowerPoints) as a way of encouraging students to discuss and write about contemporary world authors such as Kukrit Pramoj (Thailand) and Nawal el Saadawi (Egypt). It is a Writing Intensive (WI) course in the Global Development Pathway (Area C-2). 

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English 260: Great Books

Professor: Corey Sparks

Create/Adapt/Disrupt: Hacking/Great Books

"Whatever code we hack, be it programming language, poetic language, math or music, curves or colourings, we create the possibility of new things entering the world."

- McKenzie Wark, a hacker manifesto [version 4.0]

“Hacking” calls up images of violence and of innovation; it evokes clandestine digital actions that operate outside the law. We call hackers criminals; we also celebrate them as creators. In this course we will be asking several related questions: What does it mean to consider great books as objects to be hacked? What gets created? What new forms might old stories take? What new forms might we take? To delve into these questions, we will engage texts that probe issues of creation, adaptation, and disruption. These texts will come from a range of time periods, genres, and media. In tandem, we will also do some of our own hacking; we will use contemporary digital media to create, adapt, and disrupt right alongside the books we read. If this course can be said to have a central claim, it is that the core concepts of “hacking”—creation, adaptation, and disruption—have a long history in literary texts. Not only does this course explore the ways that new media technologies might help us engage these texts. This course is also a chance to think about how great books might hack back.

Over the course of the semester we will:
/engage a variety of literary genres across a range of time periods
/sharpen analytical reading and writing skills
/create interpretations and make arguments in multiple media

Possible Texts

The Book of Genesis, Illustrated by R. Crumb. R. Crumb.
Metamorphoses, Book X. Ovid.
Sir Orfeo. Anonymous. Edited by Anne Laskaya and Eve Salisbury.
“Abbatoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus.” Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds.
Paradise Lost, Books 1-4. John Milton.
Radi Os. Ronald Johnson.
Leaves of Grass, Book IV: Children of Adam. Walt Whitman.
@tweetsofgrass
“Blood Music.” Greg Bear.
He, She and It. Marge Piercy.
“Digital Decay.” Claire L. Evans.

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English 261: Women in Hip Hop (Women Writers)

Professor: Kelly Candelaria

In the last decade there has been a resurgence of Dystopian Literature. This rise has been led by women authors and their heroines. Through these novels, that have greatly influenced pop culture, we find an interesting focus on the growth of these heroines, their personal agency and political power, and how they are breaking away from traditional gender roles. ENGL 261 will focus on the ways women writers are influencing women and how we are shifting to a stronger, more powerful role in our society through the pages of dystopian literature. By looking through theoretical lenses and the characters in the novels, we will consider how these narratives are breaking all of the rules when it comes to gender constraints. 

Click Image to Enlarge!

ENGL 261 Flyer Fall 2015


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English 264I: Amer Eth/Reg Writers-WI

Professor: Aiping Zhang

This course is going to be a study of ethnic literature only. It is not designed to give any coverage of regional literature. Three goals will guide the lectures, reading assignments and quizzes in this course; first, to give a detailed critical reading of a representative set of great novels and stories written by Native American, African American, Asian American and Chicano writers; second, to connect these novels and stories into the broader issues of American culture and the deeper traditions of the mainstream American fiction writing; third, to define a basic set of literary terms such as motif, character, plot, voice, time, setting and objects.

 

Required Texts/readings

Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

James Baldwin, Go Tell It on the Mountain

Toni Morrison, Tar Baby

Bharati Mukherjee, Jasmine

Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club

Jose A. Villarreal, Pocho

Zitkala-Ša, American Indian Stories

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English 276: Survey of Early British Lit

Professor: John Traver

“Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.”  -Sir Francis Bacon

This course provides you with a full-course meal of British literature.  We will survey the development of British literature, beginning with the Medieval period (with works such as Beowulf and The Canterbury Tales), continuing through the Renaissance and early Seventeenth Century (with authors such as Shakespeare and Donne), and concluding our repast with the Restoration and Eighteenth Century (with works such as Pope’s The Rape of the Lock and Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels).  In order to survey such a wide-spanning period of history, our pace will have to be fast (i.e., a lot of texts will be “tasted” or hastily “swallowed”).  As a result, you will not only discover how British literary traditions develop over time, but also be introduced to a variety of delectable texts for future periods of digestion.

Assignments will include the following:  a mid-term examination and a final; journals and Blackboard postings; a group presentation; poetry memorization; quizzes.

Required Texts: 

Volumes 1-3 of The Broadview Anthology of British Literature.  (Please get the most recent editions.)

Samuel Johnson’s The History of Rasselas, ed. Jessica Richard (Broadview).

(Note that all 4 Broadview texts are available at a discount when purchased together.)

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English 277: Survey of Later British Lit

Professor: Teresa Traver

This course provides an overview of two centuries of literature, from the Romantic era to the dawn of the twenty-first century. We will also explore the historical and cultural contexts that shaped the literature of these time periods. Readings will include poetry, non-fiction prose, drama, and both short and long fiction. Note: In this class, rather than writing one or two “major” papers, you will produce a series of journal entries in response to specific prompts. Assignments also include in-class writing assignments, a mid-term and a final exam. Class participation and attendance are required.


Required Texts: (Subject to change) Broadview Anthology of British Literature Concise Volume B; The Longman’s edition of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey; E.M. Forster’s Passage to India.


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English 278: Survey of Early American Lit

Professor: Matthew Brown

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English 279: Survey of Later American Lit

Professor: Aiping Zhang

This course is a survey of American literature between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of the Jazz Age. We will start the course with an overview of the historical and cultural context, in which American literature transformed itself through a series of major literary experiments. By reading representative texts in various genres, we will study a very diverse group of authors who made key contributions to the development of the “Local Color” Writing, Native American Folklore, American Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, Lost Generation, and African American literature during this period. Voluntary presentations will be organized to encourage the students' participation in discussion.

 

Required Texts/Readings

The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vols. C and D, 8th Edition


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English 320: Poetry Writing

Professor: Jeanne Clark

One breath taken completely; one poem, fully written, fully read - in such a moment, anything can happen.

—      Jane Hirshfield (Nine Gates: Entering the Mind of Poetry)

 

The aim of this course is to make you a better writer of poetry by making you a better reader of poetry.  Reading poetry—and writing it—is a matter of paying attention, of being alive to the possibilities of language, of learning to appreciate craft, and allowing the poem to be what it wants to be, and all it can be, in combining and reacting with the speaker’s sensibility.  You will read poems by both established and up-and-coming poets, representing a wide constellation of voices, approaches, and subjects. 

 

Each week you’ll complete a poem draft—writing (or rewriting) a poem in response to an instructor prompt.  We’ll read poems—yours and those of well-known and emerging poets—and talk about what we find there in terms of news and craft.  We’ll experiment with revision and talk about the art of submitting work for publication.  Some of the scheduled class periods will be devoted to reading and to craft issues, and some will be devoted to “workshopping” your poems.  The “fifth hour” will be used for alternative activities, both individual and small group activities rather than whole class meetings: visiting art galleries, sauntering through woodlands, talking with visiting writers about writing and the writing life, and so on.

 

Questions?  Contact Jeanne E. Clark (Siskiyou 133), jeclark2@csuchico.edu

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English 321: Fiction Writing

Instructor: Paul Eggers

English 321 is an intensive workshop-based course in the writing of the short story. You will be asked to write “literary” work in this class (i.e., work that is serious, ambitious, well-crafted, contemporary, adult-oriented, emotionally engaging, and so forth). Work that does not aspire to the literary is outside the domain of this class. This includes literature for children, the sentimental romance, formulaic mystery writing, and the like. We shall study writing techniques and craft by reading each other’s work and by studying the work of established authors. Expect to do a lot of writing and revision.

Please note that this course is specifically designed with the short story in mind. For the purposes of this class, we will define a short story as a self-contained fictional prose narrative that does not exceed 5,000 words (about twenty double-spaced pages). “Long” short stories, novellas, and novel excerpts are outside the domain of this class.


Required Text (subject to change)

Boyle, T. Coraghessan, ed. Doubletakes: Pairs of Contemporary Short Stories. Boston: Thomson-Wadsworth, 2004.

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English 327: Creative Nonfiction

Instructor: Paul Eggers

Creative nonfiction is the kind of writing you’ll find in magazines such as The New Yorker, as well as in memoirs and investigative journalism. It’s “nonfiction” in that it’s fact-based, exploring real-life events and experiences (especially your own); and it’s “creative” in that it recognizes and makes use of the writer’s presence and imagination, and the unreliability of memory. This kind of writing leads to interesting essays that draw upon the writer’s own life and engagement with the outside world. It tells the truth—the real, not-made-up truth—but it sculpts that truth, making the truth vivid and convincing, using the same techniques fiction writers use.

            We’ll likely do three kinds of creative nonfiction: memoir, personal essay, and literary journalism (we’ll also discuss what these labels actually mean). We’ll draft the stories first, then workshop them, then revise them. Along the way we’ll discuss theoretical matters—e.g., is objectivity possible? how reliable is memory?—and we’ll do idea-generation and drafting work, as well as read and discuss the writing of some of our best creative nonfiction writers, including Truman Capote, Norman Mailler, Annie Dillard, and others. No tests and no final.

            For our text, we’ll use Bill Roorbach’s Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: The Art of Truth; additionally, I’ll pass out relevant articles along the way.

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English 332: Intro to Literacy Studies

Professor: Kim Jaxon

English 332 introduces you to the interdisciplinary field of literacy studies. We will look at historical and current discussions that play out in our culture around the uses of literacy. We’ll especially explore digital literacy and consider how technology has rapidly changed the ways that literacy is used and understood. We will also pay particular attention to adolescent literacy, including adolescents’ use of digital platforms.

Questions we will consider: What is the nature of literacy? What is the relationship between language and thought? Between literacy and learning? What is the relationship between literacy and schooling? And what is the relationship between literacy and social, economic, and political development? We will work toward an understanding of literacy as enabling rather than causal, as embedded within society, and as depending for its meaning and practice upon social institutions and conditions.

To get a feel for the course, you can check out our website:http://kimjaxon.com/engl332/


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English 333: Adv. Comp. for Future Teachers

Professor: Sarah Pape

Professor: Anna Moore

Advanced Composition for Future Teachers is designed for future multiple-subject teachers. The two primary goals of the class are related: the improvement of your own writing, and the increase of your knowledge about the ways writing can be effectively taught in elementary school classrooms. Over the course of the semester, you can expect to read professional books and articles about the teaching of writing, while conducting self-designed research and composition projects. Course work will include weekly reading responses, multimodal and technology-facilitated composition projects, and a culminating research project.

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English 335: Rhetoric and Writing

Professor: Laura Sparks

Professor: Chris Fosen

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English 338Z: Environmental Rhetoric

Professor: Chris Fosen

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English 340: Approaches to Literary Genres

Professor: John Traver

This course introduces you to several literary genres (fiction, poetry, and drama) and provides you with a set of analytical skills and strategies for interpreting literary texts.  You will learn to recognize common genre conventions, as well as how skilled authors may work within (or even defy) these conventions in ways which surprise us.  You will also become familiar with common literary terminology and learn how to construct an effective literary argument.

Note:  because this course provides important preparation for the English major, it will involve a number of assignments.  Assignments will include the following:  a midterm and a final; two papers; shorter writing assignments (such as postings on Blackboard); quizzes; memorization of one poem of your choice; class participation.

Required texts: 

Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, ed. Peter G. Beidler (3rd edition).  Please make sure to use this edition.

The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature, ed. Michael Meyer.


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English 341: Reading Lit for Future Teachers

Professor: Kim Jaxon (Section 01 & 03)

This course is required of all Liberal Studies majors, but open to all students. As the title of the course, “Reading Literature,” suggests, students will read an array of literary genres, including short stories, novels, poetry, and drama. Students will also read books and articles by teacher-researchers about reading pedagogy. By the conclusion of the term, students will be able to read a wide array of literary texts, both those written for adult readers and those written for younger readers; students will be able to identify literary devices and consider their effects; students will be able to select literature for children to read and develop teaching plans to help students read literary texts with understanding and pleasure. Students will demonstrate their learning through successful presentations/performances, group projects, and written/visual assignments. This course addresses the literary study areas specified by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing as requirements for multiple-subject teachers: literary concepts and conventions; literary genres; interpretation of literary texts. Our section has what I hope will be a “choose your own adventure” feel to it; you’ll choose many of your texts for the semester from a curated list. Additionally, we'll be reading young adult novels and blogging with 8th graders from Chico Country Day School.

To get a feel for the course, you can check out our website:http://www.kimjaxon.com/engl341/


Professor: Anna Moore (Sections 02 & 72)

Reading Literature for Future Teachers is designed for future multiple-subject teachers. This class is structured to expose you to current thinking about the teaching of literature in elementary schools while simultaneously allowing you to read widely in a variety of genres. We will read some of the literary texts together as a class, but you will also have the opportunity to select many readings on your own. Course work will be primarily project-based, with several small assignments, three larger projects, and a final exam.

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English 342: Literature of the Child

Professor: Teresa Traver

Literature of the Child is an introduction to literature written for or about children.  Our readings draw from three centuries of literary depictions of children. As part of the Health and Wellness pathway, this course emphasizes the following dimensions of wellness: emotional, social, spiritual and intellectual. As we examine didactic texts from previous centuries, we may ask what role such literature plays in developing children’s intellectual and spiritual wellbeing. Other texts we’ll read focus on children as embodied beings, raising questions about physical, emotional and social health. Assignments include a paper with multiple drafts, a presentation, online journal entries, a midterm and a final exam. Class participation and attendance are required. (Note: I recommend that English majors interested in 342 take the writing-intensive section, if possible.)

Required Texts: (Subject to change): J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan; Francis Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden; J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone; Judie Blume’s Are You There God? It’s me, Margaret; and R.J. Palacio’s Wonder.


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English 342I: Literature of the Child (Writing Intensive)

Professor: Teresa Traver

Literature of the Child is an introduction to literature written for or about children.  Our readings draw from three centuries of literary depictions of children. Some of the questions we’ll pose include: what is the purpose of children’s literature? Why arechildren depicted the way they are in literature? What kinds of things does this literature suggest about the role of the developing child in relation to the family, the local community, the environment, and the wider world? Assignments include two papers with multiple drafts, eight journal entries, oral presentations, a midterm and a final exam. (Note: this class does require more writing than the regular section, but it is a smaller class that allows more lively interaction, so I highly recommend it to English majors interested in children’s literature.) Class participation and attendance are required.

Required Texts: (Subject to change): J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan; Mildred Taylor’s Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry; Francis Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden; Judie Blume’s Are You There God? It’s me, Margaret; and and R.J. Palacio’s Wonder.

English 350I: Science, Technology and Lit

Professor: Matthew Brown

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English 353: Multicultural Literature

Professor: Rob Burton

English 353 uses various technology tools (such as Blogs and PowerPoints) as a way of encouraging students to discuss and write about contemporary Multicultural Literature, from the essays of Andrew Lam (Vietnam-U.S.) to the short stories of Jhumpa Lahiri (India-U.S.). It is a GE Upper Division Area C course (Arts and Humanities) in the Global Development Studies Pathway.

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English 355: Bible, Lit, and Culture

Professor: John Traver

Why do President Obama’s speeches positively reference a “brother’s keeper?”  Why does the narrator of Moby Dick want to be called “Ishmael?” In John Milton’s Paradise Lost, how much of the “story” is of his own invention? To answer such questions, readers need a shared familiarity with the Bible that many writers and thinkers have taken for granted.

This course will provide you with a working knowledge of the structure and themes of the Bible to help you recognize allusions and perceive its influence on the shape of English literature and the broader culture; we’ll look at the Bible alongside examples of the texts it has influenced. We’ll also examine the genres and literary qualities of the Bible itself, such as its use of symbols, typology, repetition, acrostics, and even puns! Our goals are to have a greater appreciation of the Bible as a work of literature in itself and to understand its profound effect on the shape of subsequent literature and culture.

Note that this class is writing-intensive, fulfilling either the genre or period requirement for the English major, or serving as an upper-division arts and humanities GE requirement in the EJP pathway.  All levels of familiarity with the Bible are welcome (from none, to knowledgeable).  We will be reading in translation selections from the Hebrew Bible (or “Old Testament”), the New Testament, and the deuterocanonical works (or “Apocrypha”).  Texts will probably include:

Robert Crumb.  The Book of Genesis Illustrated.

Ed. Herbert Marks.  The English Bible:  King James Version.  The Old Testament.  Norton Critical Edition.

Ed. Gerald Hammond and Austin Busch.  The English Bible:  King James Version.  The New Testament and the Apocrypha.  Norton Critical Edition.

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English 364I: American Ethnic & Reg Lit - Asian American Literature (Writing Intensive)

Professor: Aiping Zhang

This is a survey of Asian American literature. It will introduce you to the various traditions and issues of Asian American experience in literature. We will explore early and contemporary novels, short stories, and plays by writers of different gender, ethnicity, and culture. While giving major Asian groups --- Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, and Indian --- particular attention, this course seeks to present the larger Asian American literary and intellectual landscape. Also, we will try to define a basic set of literary terms, such as motif, character, plot, voice, time, setting, and objects, and develop our analytical skills through the reading of the chosen texts and the comparisons to mainstream writers. Students will be encouraged to share their thoughts and experiences in group activities and classroom discussions.

 

Required Texts/Readings

Jessica Hagedorn, Charlie Chan Is Dead 2: An Anthology of Contemporary Asian

American Fiction

David Henry Hwang, M. Butterfly

Chang Rae-Lee, Native Speaker

Bharati Mukherjee, Desirable Daughters

John Okada, No-No Boy

Bienvenido Santos, Scent of Apples

Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club


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English 371: Principles of Language

Professor: Ela Thurgood

This course will introduce students to the general nature and structure of human language. It covers the core areas of linguistics (a) phonetics: the production, description, classification and transcription of speech sounds; (b) phonology: the description of the systematic patterning of sounds in human language; (c) morphology: the study of the internal structure of words; (d) syntax: the study of sentence structure; and (e) semantics: the study of linguistic meaning. In addition, this course addresses other important areas of linguistics, including pragmatics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, and historical linguistics.

Pragmatics is concerned with how people use language within a context and why they use language in particular ways. Psycholinguistics is the discipline that tests assumptions about the processing and the learning of language. It attempts to answer questions about how language is represented and processed in the brain and what areas of the brain are used for language functions and processes. Socio-linguistics deals with the relationship between language and society. The knowledge the students gain in this part of the course will help them to fully comprehend variation in language use; that is, students will address issues in inter-speaker and intra-speaker variation. historical linguistics looks at language change through time (diachronic change) and language change at any given point in time (synchronic change/variation). It also addresses language relationships, both genetic and areal.

This course fulfills the GE breadth requirement for area C2.

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English 375: Introduction to Engl Grammar

Professor: Sara Trechter

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English 415: Editing Literary Magazines

Professor: Sarah Pape

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English 431: Theory/Practice in Tutor Comp

Instructor: Kim Jaxon

English 431 offers training and experience in the tutoring of students in composition. Paid positions in the English 30 Writing Workshop Program require successful completion of this course. 431 provides an introduction to theories and practices of writing instruction and is a recommended prerequisite for English 634: Teaching Academic Writing, the graduate course for teachers of English 130: Academic Writing.

English 431 includes a weekly seminar in which we attempt to understand what it means to teach and support the teaching of writing. While the course is closely connected to our first year writing program, particularly English 130 and English 30, we will think about our work with these spaces as cases that help us explore concepts in teaching and learning related to writing instruction. One unit of this four-unit course is a practicum, which requires you to intern in an English 30 workshop or the ESL Resource Center.  This practicum experience provides a rich resource for us to explore how to mentor student writing.

To get a feel for the course, you can check out our website:http://www.kimjaxon.com/engl431/


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English 441: Shakespeare

Professor: Erin Kelly

English 441 is an introduction to the plays of William Shakespeare. We will read plays from all four dramatic genres – comedy, history, tragedy and romance -- including A Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, Henry V, Hamlet, and The Winter's Tale. In this course, we will focus on Shakespeare in theatrical performance, learning the conventions and conditions of performance in Renaissance playhouses and watching excerpts of modern theatrical productions. Through this approach, we will discuss how Shakespeare works within and against the conventions of dramatic genres and consider the variety of ways that these plays can be presented on stage. 

The goal of this course is for students to improve their ability to critically read, discuss, and write about Shakespeare’s works. In addition, the course is designed to improve students’ historical and cultural knowledge of Shakespearean theatrical practice.

This is an approved Writing Proficiency course; a grade of C- or better certifies writing proficiency for majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 130 or JOUR 130 (or equivalent) with a grade of C- or higher; ENGL 276, ENGL 340. 


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English 448: The Long Eighteenth Century

Professor: John Traver

“There is no great genius without a mixture of madness.”  -Aristotle

“"There is no man whose imagination does not sometimes predominate over his reason.”  -Samuel Johnson

 

Though often called “The Age of Enlightenment,” the eighteenth century might seem as aptly termed “The Age of Lunacy”:  whether it was in believing the widespread hoax that Mary Toft gave birth to rabbits or in spending one’s holiday at the “Bedlam” asylum to stare at the patients, the period was preoccupied with madness and “unreasonable” beliefs.  While famous authors were themselves judged or even institutionalized for seeming insanity (such as Christopher Smart and William Cowper), literature seemed to celebrate characters’ outrageous behavior, ranging from Gulliver’s hatred of all humans as Yahoos in Gulliver’s Travels—to Fantomina’s sexual roleplaying in Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina—to Christian’s running away from his wife and kids with his fingers in his ears and yelling, “Life, life” in John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress.  While British empiricism, such as in John Locke’s Essay Concerning Human Understanding, attempted to give shape to the apparent chaos of human beliefs and behavior, literature often embodied the powers of chaos and freedom found in “humors” and “the spleen,” such as Alexander Pope’s The Rape of the Lock and Anne Finch’s The Spleen.  With all of the fascinating texts assigned this semester, you’d have to be insane not to enroll!

Assignments will include the following:  a mid-term and a final; one short paper and one longer paper; short writing assignments; a class presentation; memorization of one poem of your choice; class participation.

Required Texts

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 3, The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century (2nd ed.).

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English 451: Modern Poetry

Professor: Jeanne Clark

If I read a book [and] it makes my whole body so cold no fire can ever warm me, I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.

--Emily Dickinson

 

Writer: how books read each other.

--James Richardson

 

 

 

Welcome!  This is an upper-division genre course. It is a course in which we will labor to learn more about the genre of poetry: how poems/poets begat poems/poets, what terrains poets consider worth fighting for, how poems discover and shape meaning, as well as why and how we might respond to poetry reflectively, critically, and imaginatively.  This course is an exploration of full-length collections of poems, books by a diverse range of modern and contemporary poets.  We will consider the tools these poets use to make poems.  These tools will include various forms /poetic structures and specific poetic strategies such as meter, metaphor, and mousse.  Oops, I’m confusing poetry with desert, a simple enough mistake.  Further, in this course we will labor to become a generous and spirited reading and writing community, one in which we’ll work both individually and in collaborative groups to wrestle this angel of poetry into our arms. 

 

 

For more information, contact Jeanne E. Clark, jeclark2@csuchico.edu.

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English 457: The American Novel

Instructor: Aiping Zhang

To conform, or not to conform to conventions, that has always been a tough question for people who want to “live deliberately” and for writers who see originality as the life of literature. Often, those who chose not to conform ended up being discarded as “misfits,” if not “losers.” The portrayal of such “misfits” has been a long and unique tradition in American novel, and many writers themselves were treated by their peers as “misfits” for featuring non-conformable characters in their non-conventional novels. Today, however, most, if not all, of these “misfits” have become archetypal characters in American literature and their creators have been acclaimed as masters of American novel writing. Through a comparative reading of representative novels by writers of different time, gender, ethnicity, and style, we will not only find out what turned these characters and writers into “misfits,” but also examine all the visions, inventions, subtleties, ambiguities, and controversies these writers have contributed to American novel writing.

 

Required Texts/Readings:

Willa Cather, O Pioneer!

William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying

 

Gertrude Stein, Three Lives

Michael Cunningham, The Hours

 

Joseph Heller, Catch-22

John Okada, No-No Boy

 

Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Blithedale Romance

Toni Morrison, Paradise

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English 468: 20th- Cent & Contemp Brit Lit

Professor: Peter Kittle

The focus of ENGL 468 will be on novels written in the past fifty years. Since canonical texts from this period are still emerging, part of our work will be examining the issues raised by contemporary novelists, how those issues are represented in fiction, and the intersections of representation with political and cultural developments of the time. As a class, we will take on the challenge of reading, collectively, all 30 Booker Prize winning novels by British authors from 1967-2014. We will also read several books together, selected from authors like Martin Amis, Hanif Kureishi, A.S. Byatt, JK Rowling, Nick Hornby, Sue Townsend, John Mortimer, and Irvine Welsh. Assignments may include blog posts, presentations, contributions to a class wiki, book trailers, and a culminating paper/project. 

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English 470: Second Language Acquisition  

Professor: Sara Trechter

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English 471: Intsv Theo & Prac 2nd Lang Acq

Professor: Ellen Eggers

Professor: Ela Thurgood

Professor: Saundra Wright

English 471 is a linguistic approach to investigating the complex phenomenon of second language acquisition. We will begin by looking closely at the field of linguistics, primarily through an inductive exploration of the rule-governed systems in language. We will then apply this knowledge to our examination of the issues and theories related to language acquisition from a variety of perspectives (e.g., linguistic, cognitive, social, and educational) in order to gain a better understanding of the processes involved in learning a second language.

 
Note: Starting Fall 2011, English 471 is a required course for all Liberal Studies students and for students entering the Credential Program. There are, however, two exceptions:

  • Students pursuing a degree in English Education should not take Engl 471. Instead, English Education students should take the sequence Engl 371/470.
  • Students wishing to pursue a Certificate in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) should not take Engl 471. Instead, TESOL students should take the sequence Engl 371/470.

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English 472: Pedagogical Grammar

Professor: Ela Thurgood

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English 476: Phonological Analysis

Professor: Ela Thurgood

English 476 is a class for those who are interested in linguistics, who have taken a couple of linguistics courses. Please contact Ela Thurgood (ethurgood@csuchico.edu) if you have questions or would like to know more about the course.

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English 477: Semantics: Lang and Meaning

Professor: Saundra Wright

English 477 is a comprehensive exploration of semantics and an investigation of how meaning is communicated through language. We will cover a variety of diverse topics, including different theories of meaning, the relationship between semantics and conceptual structure, the link between semantics and cognition, and, crucially, how meaning is stored in our mental lexicons. We will pay special attention to word meaning and how word meaning changes over time.

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English 478: Linguistic Approaches to Reading

Professor: Peter Kittle

Linguistic Approaches to Reading is designed for students interested in language, literacy, and pedagogy. Using research from a variety of disciplines including psycholinguistics, we will examine current theories about reading comprehension and apply those theories in self-designed inquiry projects. Course work will include reading responses, group presentations, an inquiry project, and a final exam.

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