Spring 2015

The following are the course numbers of the classes offered through the English Department (listed within The University Catalog under ENGL). Each number will send you to a brief description of the course, when available.

130 130PI 203 220I 240 252
258I 260 261 264I 276 278
279 320 321 327 332 333
335 338Z 340 341 342 342I
350I 353 356 364 364I 371
375 415 420 421 431 441
456 458 461 464 471 475
489

499

534

English 130: Academic Writing

English 130I, “Academic Writing,” is a core General Education Foundation course (Area A2) that introduces you to the challenges of university level writing, reading, and critical thinking.  This course uses writing to develop your scholarly curiosity.  To do this, instructors focus on:

  • deepening your research skills,
  • developing your ability to read and respond to difficult texts, and,
  • most importantly, helping you through the writing process in a social, collaborative, revision-focused environment.

All writing-intensive GE courses require a minimum of 2,500 words, and students enrolled in English 130 or 130P must demonstrate the ability to criticize, analyze, and advocate ideas with persuasive force in writing. A grade of C- or better is needed to pass this course.

Depending on your instructor, the focus for research in English 130I varies. Your specific course may research issues in digital culture, identity, food, popular culture, or music, just to name a few of the options. The common thread among all sections is an inquiry-based approach to pursuing research questions that are interesting to students. 

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English 130PI: Academic Writing

Please note: English 130PI is not offered every semester.

English 130I, “Academic Writing,” is a core General Education Foundation course (Area A2) that introduces you to the challenges of university level writing, reading, and critical thinking.  This course uses writing to develop your scholarly curiosity.  To do this, instructors focus on:

  • deepening your research skills,
  • developing your ability to read and respond to difficult texts, and,
  • most importantly, helping you through the writing process in a social, collaborative, revision-focused environment.

All writing-intensive GE courses require a minimum of 2,500 words, and students enrolled in English 130 or 130P must demonstrate the ability to criticize, analyze, and advocate ideas with persuasive force in writing. A grade of C- or better is needed to pass this course.

Depending on your instructor, the focus for research in English 130I varies. Your specific course may research issues in digital culture, identity, food, popular culture, or music, just to name a few of the options. The common thread among all sections is an inquiry-based approach to pursuing research questions that are interesting to students. 

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English 203: Shakespeare On Film

Instructor: Robert O'Brien

From the silent-movie era to the present, filmmakers have interpreted Shakespearean drama. Some interpretations have been lost, others are of dubious quality, but many are masterpieces of cinematic art. In this course, you'll study some of the best Shakespeare films made since the Second World War. By the end of the semester, you'll have gained a deeper understanding of both film and Shakespearean drama.

 

Classes will be a mixture of lectures, discussions, and film showings. Outside of class, you'll read synopses, scenes, and passages from the plays. You'll also write essays responding to the readings and films and take mid-term and final examinations. Our text will be the two-volume edition of The Norton Shakespeare.

 

The course may be taken as an elective or to satisfy the General Education arts requirement.


http://www.shakespeareflix.net

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English 220I: Beginning Creative Writing

Professor: Rob Davidson

English 220I is designed to introduce you to the writing of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. You will be asked to write “literary” work in this class (i.e., work that is serious, ambitious, well-crafted, contemporary, adult-oriented, emotionally engaging, and so forth). Work that does not aspire to the literary is outside the domain of this class. This includes literature for children, the sentimental romance, formulaic mystery writing, and the like. We shall study writing techniques and craft in each genre by reading each other’s work and by studying the work of established authors. Expect to do a lot of writing and revision.

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English 240: Literature of Life

Professor: Sandra Flake 

In this course, we will read and discuss literature from various nations and cultures, with an emphasis on the relationships of these works to our lives and current events:  what can these works tell us about how different societies function, about relationships between and among people, about human behavior?  What can we learn about our own and others’ lives from what we read? Where does personal responsibility come in?  The required reading will include outstanding works of fiction, poetry and drama by American and international writers, and class will be focused primarily on discussion, with occasional quizzes and group assignments.  Students will also write responses to themes and issues raised by the reading and complete two projects.

Literature for Life is an approved General Education course in Lifelong Learning (area e), and it is included in two of the General Education Pathways in which students can complete an interdisciplinary minor:  1) Ethics, Justice, and Policy and 2) Great Books and Ideas.

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English 252: American Indian Literature

Professor: Sandra Flake

In this course, we will read and discuss works drawn from the wide range of Native American Literatures.  Our readings will range from pre-contact texts to contemporary American Indian writing. We will consider both oral and written texts, drawn from a variety of genres including songs, chants, stories, autobiography, film, novels and poetry.  In addition, this course will help to develop an understanding of the critical concerns raised by cross-cultural reading.  Although our orientation will be primarily literary, we will also weave cultural, historical, political, ecological and spiritual dimensions into our discussions. Classes will include discussion, some lecture, some oral reading, with occasional quizzes and group work.  You will write some brief responses to the reading and complete projects/papers and exams.        

American Indian Literatures is an approved General Education course in Humanities (area c-2), and it is included in one of the General Education Pathways in which students can complete an interdisciplinary minor, Sustainability Studies.

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English 258I: World Literature

Professor: Rob Burton

English 258 uses various technology tools (such as Blogs and PowerPoints) as a way of encouraging students to discuss and write about contemporary world authors such as Kukrit Pramoj (Thailand), Bessie Head (Botswana), and Nawal el Saadawi (Egypt). It is a Writing Intensive (WI) course in the Global Development Pathway (Area C-2). 

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English 260: Great Books

Professor: Corey Sparks

***
“Whatever code we hack, be it programming language, poetic language, math or music, curves or colourings, we create the possibility of new things entering the world.”

-McKenzie Wark, a hacker manifesto [version 4.0]

***
“A book is a device to ignite the imagination.”
-Alan Bennett, The Uncommon Reader
 
***

“Hacking” calls up images of violence and of innovation; it evokes clandestine digital actions that operate outside the law. We call hackers criminals; we also celebrate them as creators. In this course we will be asking several related questions: What does it mean to consider great books as objects to be hacked? What gets created? What new forms might a “book” take? What new forms might we take? To delve into these questions, we will engage texts that probe issues of creation, adaptation, and/or disruption. These texts will come from a range of time periods, genres, and media. In tandem, we will also do some of our own hacking; we will use contemporary digital media to create, adapt, and disrupt right alongside the books we read. (Special computer or design skills are not required; we will hold workshops on all of the digital tools we will use during the semester.) Over the course of the semester you will hone a set of analytical skills and strategies for creating interpretations and making arguments.

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English 261: Women in Hip Hop (Women Writers)

Professor: Tracy Butts

Hip Hop is a multi-billion dollar global phenomenon encompassing more than just Rap music.  For many, Hip Hop is a movement, a way of life, influencing all aspects of culture including belief systems, attitudes, language, arts, politics, fashion, and technology.  ENGL 261 (Women Writers) will focus on the ways women’s lives have shaped and been shaped by Hip Hop culture with regard to gender roles, sexual identity and expression, socio-economic status, and ethnic and/or religious identities through an examination of literature (novels, narratives, memoirs, interviews, essays, criticism, and song lyrics) written by and about women in Hip Hop.   

Possible texts include all of or excerpts from:

Patricia Hill Collins’s From Black Power to Hip Hop: Racism, Nationalism, and Feminism

Gwendolyn Pough’s Home Girls Make Some Noise: Hip Hop Feminism Anthology

Karrine Steffans’s Confessions of a Video Vixen

T. Denean Sharpley Whiting’s Pimps Up, Ho’s Down: Hip Hop’s Hold on Young Black Women

Joan Morgan’s When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost

Sista Souljah’s The Coldest Winter Ever

Lyrics by Queen Latifah, Missy Elliott, M.I.A., Lauryn Hill, Lil Kim, Beyonce, Soosan Firooz, Ms. Krazie, etc.

This class meets the following General Education requirements: Humanities.

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English 264I: Amer Eth/Reg Writers-WI

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English 276: Survey of Early British Lit

Professor: Robert O'Brien

This course will introduce you to a millennium of British literature, from the eighth century through the eighteenth. Classes will be a mixture of lectures and discussion; you will write some short essays and a term paper and take a mid-term and final examination. Our texts will include volumes A, B, and C of The Norton Anthology of English Literature (2012).

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English 278: Survey of Early American Lit

Professor: Rob Davidson

This class covers American literature from its beginnings to the 1850s. The reading load, while substantial, should cover not more than 100 pages from our anthologies per week. Students will be required to complete a series of shorter online responses, two longer expository papers, a mid-term exam, and a comprehensive final exam.

Required Texts:

Nina Baym, et al., editor. Norton Anthology of American Literature, Volume A: Beginnings to 1820. 8th edition. New York: Norton, 2012.

-----. Norton Anthology of American Literature, Volume B: 1820-1865. 8th edition. New York: Norton, 2012.

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English 279: Survey of Later American Lit

Professor: Aiping Zhang

This course is a survey of American literature between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of the Jazz Age. We will start the course with an overview of the historical and cultural context, in which American literature transformed itself through a series of major literary experiments. By reading representative texts in various genres, we will study a very diverse group of authors who made key contributions to the development of the “Local Color” Writing, Native American Folklore, American Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, Lost Generation, and African American literature during this period. Voluntary presentations will be organized to encourage the students' participation in discussion.

READING LIST

The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vols. C and D, 8th Edition

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English 320: Poetry Writing

Professor: Jeanne Clark

One breath taken completely; one poem, fully written, fully read - in such a moment, anything can happen.
—      Jane Hirshfield (Nine Gates: Entering the Mind of Poetry)
 

The aim of this course is to make you a better writer of poetry by making you a better reader of poetry.  Reading poetry—and writing it—is a matter of paying attention, of being alive to the possibilities of language, of learning to appreciate craft, and allowing the poem to be what it wants to be, and all it can be, in combining and reacting with the speaker’s sensibility.  You will read poems by both established and up-and-coming poets, representing a wide constellation of voices, approaches, and subjects. 

 

Each week you’ll complete a poem draft—writing (or rewriting) a poem in response to an instructor prompt.  We’ll read poems—yours and those of well-known and emerging poets—and talk about what we find there in terms of news and craft.  We’ll experiment with revision and talk about the art of submitting work for publication.  Some of the scheduled class periods will be devoted to reading and to craft issues, and some will be devoted to “workshopping” your poems.  The “fifth hour” will be used for alternative activities, both individual and small group activities rather than whole class meetings: visiting art galleries, sauntering through woodlands, talking with visiting writers about writing and the writing life, and so on.

 

Questions?  Contact Jeanne E. Clark (Siskiyou 133), jeclark2@csuchico.edu

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English 321: Fiction Writing

Instructor: Rob Davidson

English 321 is an intensive workshop-based course in the writing of the short story. You will be asked to write “literary” work in this class (i.e., work that is serious, ambitious, well-crafted, contemporary, adult-oriented, emotionally engaging, and so forth). Work that does not aspire to the literary is outside the domain of this class. This includes literature for children, the sentimental romance, formulaic mystery writing, and the like. We shall study writing techniques and craft by reading each other’s work and by studying the work of established authors. Expect to do a lot of writing and revision.

Please note that this course is specifically designed with the short story in mind. For the purposes of this class, we will define a short story as a self-contained fictional prose narrative that does not exceed 5,000 words (about twenty double-spaced pages). “Long” short stories, novellas, and novel excerpts are outside the domain of this class.


Required Text (subject to change)

Boyle, T. Coraghessan, ed. Doubletakes: Pairs of Contemporary Short Stories. Boston: Thomson-Wadsworth, 2004.

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English 327: Creative Nonfiction

Fall 2014, MWF 11-11:50 and M 2-2:50

4 units

Instructor: Dr. Paul Eggers

Creative nonfiction is the kind of writing you’ll find in magazines such as The New Yorker, as well as in memoirs and investigative journalism. It’s “nonfiction” in that it’s fact-based, exploring real-life events and experiences (especially your own); and it’s “creative” in that it recognizes and makes use of the writer’s presence and imagination, and the unreliability of memory. This kind of writing leads to interesting essays that draw upon the writer’s own life and engagement with the outside world. It tells the truth—the real, not-made-up truth—but it sculpts that truth, making the truth vivid and convincing, using the same techniques fiction writers use.

            We’ll likely do three kinds of creative nonfiction: memoir, personal essay, and literary journalism (we’ll also discuss what these labels actually mean). We’ll draft the stories first, then workshop them, then revise them. Along the way we’ll discuss theoretical matters—e.g., is objectivity possible? how reliable is memory?—and we’ll do idea-generation and drafting work, as well as read and discuss the writing of some of our best creative nonfiction writers, including Truman Capote, Norman Mailler, Annie Dillard, and others. No tests and no final.

            For our text, we’ll use Bill Roorbach’s Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: The Art of Truth; additionally, I’ll pass out relevant articles along the way.

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English 332: Intro to Literacy Studies

Professor: Tom Fox

English 332 introduces you to the interdisciplinary field of literacy studies. We will look at historical and current discussions that play out in our culture around the uses of literacy. We’ll especially explore digital literacy and consider how technology has rapidly changed the ways that literacy is used and understood. We will also pay particular attention to adolescent literacy, including adolescents’ use of digital platforms.

Questions we will consider: What is the nature of literacy? What is the relationship between language and thought? Between literacy and learning? What is the relationship between literacy and schooling? And what is the relationship between literacy and social, economic, and political development? We will work toward an understanding of literacy as enabling rather than causal, as embedded within society, and as depending for its meaning and practice upon social institutions and conditions.

Internship for English Education Majors: If you are an English Education major, this course also requires that you complete your 45-hour practicum as part of the work of the class. You will enroll in English 489 and receive 1 unit of credit for this internship. You will be placed in local secondary school settings through CAVE. CAVE will present an orientation to get you ready for this placement and help you gain clearance to work in local schools. We’ll discuss this on the first day of class; no need to do anything prior to class.

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English 333: Adv. Comp. for Future Teachers

Professor: Peter Kittle (Sections 03 and 72)

Advanced Composition for Future Teachers is designed for future multiple-subject teachers. The two primary goals of the class are related: the improvement of your own writing, and the increase of your knowledge about the ways writing can be effectively taught in elementary school classrooms. Over the course of the semester, you can expect to read professional books and articles about the teaching of writing, while conducting self-designed research and composition projects. Course work will include weekly reading responses, multimodal and technology-facilitated composition projects, and a culminating research project.

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English 335: Rhetoric and Writing

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English 338Z: Environmental Rhetoric

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English 340: Approaches to Literary Genres

Professor: Geoff Baker

The goal of this course is to introduce you to the tools we use to read, analyze and discuss the three primary literary genres of poetry, drama, and fiction. We’ll be reading a diverse and fascinating cross-section of traditional and modern poems, theatrical tragedy and comedy, and fiction short and long. Along the way, we’ll become familiar with the terminology used to dig into literature and to explain what it does, why it does it, and why we value it.

Course texts:

Meyer, ed. The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing, MUST BE 8th edition.                                                                                    ISBN: 0312469594


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English 341: Reading Lit for Future Tchrs

Professor: Peter Kittle (Section 01)

This course is intended for future teachers of elementary-age students, and will explore the nature of reading and elements of literature. We will read professional texts about reading and the teaching of reading, and read a wide variety of literary texts. Fiction, drama, and poetry will be studied, as well as children’s literature and fairy tales. Students will complete a variety of projects, presentations, and exams over the course of the semester.


Professor: Anna Moore (Section 72)

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English 342: Literature of the Child

Professor: Teresa Traver

Literature of the Child is an introduction to literature written for or about children.  Our readings draw from three centuries of literary depictions of children. As part of the Health and Wellness pathway, this course emphasizes the following dimensions of wellness: emotional, social, spiritual and intellectual. As we examine didactic texts from previous centuries, we may ask what role such literature plays in developing children’s intellectual and spiritual wellbeing. Other texts we’ll read focus on children as embodied beings, raising questions about physical, emotional and social health. Assignments include a paper with multiple drafts, a presentation, online journal entries, a midterm and a final exam. Class participation and attendance are required.

Required Texts: (Subject to change): J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan; Francis Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden; J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone; Judie Blume’s Are You There God? It’s me, Margaret; and R.J. Palacio’s Wonder.

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English 342I: Literature of the Child (Writing Intensive)

Professor: Teresa Traver

Literature of the Child is an introduction to literature written for or about children.  Our readings draw from three centuries of literary depictions of children. Some of the questions we’ll pose include: what is the purpose of children’s literature? Why arechildren depicted the way they are in literature? What kinds of things does this literature suggest about the role of the developing child in relation to the family, the local community, the environment, and the wider world? Assignments include two papers with multiple drafts, eight journal entries, oral presentations, a midterm and a final exam. (Note: this class does require more writing than the regular section, but it is a smaller class that allows more lively interaction, so I highly recommend it to English majors interested in children’s literature.) Class participation and attendance are required.

Required Texts: (Subject to change): J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan; Mildred Taylor’s Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry; Francis Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden; Judie Blume’s Are You There God? It’s me, Margaret; and and R.J. Palacio’s Wonder.

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English 350I: Science, Technology and Lit

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English 353: Multicultural Literature

Professor: Rob Burton

English 353 uses various technology tools (such as Blogs and PowerPoints) as a way of encouraging students to discuss and write about contemporary Multicultural Literature, from the essays of Andrew Lam (Vietnam-U.S.) to the short stories of Jhumpa Lahiri (India-U.S.). It is a GE Upper Division Area C course (Arts and Humanities) in the Global Development Studies Pathway.

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English 356: Literature, Politics, and Activism

Professor: Geoff Baker

Honestly, what’s the use of books and movies when the history happening outside our doors is so troubling and immediate and seems to demand action and activism, not fiction and film? This question, or a version of it, has occasioned much debate in intellectual circles ever since Plato decided he would banish poets from his Republic as useless liars. Certain historical moments have forced the debate out into the open, though, and a number of literary masterpieces have sought to alter the political landscape by intervening directly in the pressing issues of the day. From antebellum slavery in the USA to 20th-century apartheid in South Africa, from 19th-century industrial exploitation to the contemporary exploitation of immigrant labor, from the Holocaust to Hiroshima, writers have sought to highlight injustices and affect social policy. In this class, students will read a number of “politically engaged” texts in order to

• understand the political, ethical, and social contexts to which these texts respond;

• suggest possible stances taken by or within the texts, or possible solutions to political problems posed by these texts;

• become familiar with some of the radically different strategies adopted by politically engaged writers, from avant-garde experimentalism to descriptive realism;

• and critically reflect on the role that these texts, and literature or literary intellectuals in general, can play as a force for political or ethical activism.

 

Texts might include novels, plays, poems, and essays by William Blake, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Émile Zola, Henrik Ibsen, Toni Morrison, Isabel Allende, Bertolt Brecht, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, Tayeb Salih, Samuel Beckett, Jean-Paul Sartre, Theodor Adorno, Simone de Beauvoir, Yevgeny Zamyatin, George Orwell, Suzanne Collins, Christa Wolf, Haruki Murakami, J.M. Coetzee, Aimé Césaire, Tony Kushner, Gerhart Hauptmann, and many others.

*This course fills an elective for the English major options in English Studies or Literature; and is part of the GE pathway in Ethics, Justice, and Policy.

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English 364: American Ethnic & Reg Lit - Asian American Literature (Writing Intensive)

Professor: Tracy Butts

ENGL 364 explores the way place, socio-economic status, gender, and sexuality inform and inflect the experience of particular cultural groups set against the larger American culture.  Classes typically focus on African American, Asian American, Chican@, or Native American literature.  Our focus this semester is Asian American literature.  We will be reading a wide range of literary genres—essays, short stories, novels, and poems—all written by authors of Chinese American, Japanese American, and Hmong American descent.  

Texts likely will include:

The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston

The Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford

Seventeen Syllables by Hisaye Yamamoto

A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki

How Do I Begin: A Hmong American Literary Anthology

The Tenth Month: A Hmong Love Novel by Thao

The Late Homecomer: A Hmong Family Memoir by Kao Kalia Yang

This class meets the following General Education Requirements: Upper-Division Arts/Humanities, Writing Intensive, and U. S. Diversity Course.  

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English 364I: American Ethnic & Reg Lit - African American Literature (Writing Intensive)

Professor: Tracy Butts

ENGL 364 explores the way place, socio-economic status, gender, and sexuality inform and inflect the experience of particular cultural groups set against the larger American culture.  Classes typically focus on African American, Asian American, Chican@, or Native American literature.  Our focus this semester is African American literature.  Beginning with Octavia Butler’s Kindred and ending with Chimamanda Adichie’s Americanah, we will examine American slavery, its enduring legacy and impact on the social constructions of race, class, gender, and sexual identity and expression in order to answer the question, “What does it mean to be Black in America?”

Texts likely will include:

Octavia Butler’s Kindred

Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God

Gwendolyn Brooks’s Maud Martha

Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man or Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon

Gloria Naylor’s Linden Hills

Daniel Black’s Perfect Peace

Chimamanda Adichie’s Americanah

This class meets the following General Education Requirements: Upper-Division Arts/Humanities, Writing Intensive, and U. S. Diversity Course

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English 371: Principles of Language

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English 375: Introduction to Engl Grammar

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English 415: Editing Literary Magazines

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English 420: Advanced Poetry Writing

Professor: Jeanne Clark



If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can ever warm me, I know that is poetry.

 If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry. 

These are the only ways I know it.  Is there any other way?

—-Emily Dickinson

 

In this course, you will write new drafts of poems, poems of your own wild imaginings.  You will read brand-new, hot-off-the-press poems by both established & up-&-coming poets, representing a wide constellation of voices, approaches, & subjects.  And you will take one or more of your poems “off the page.”

 

You will consider in depth the following craft issues: voice & tone, structure & form, titles, deep revision, & preparing manuscripts for publication.

 

News Flash: Both poets Carole Simmons Oles & Gary Thompson will give readings on campus & will visit our class.

 

Prerequisite: English 320, or permission of the instructor.  Graduate students may take this course for credit. 

Questions?  Contact Jeanne E. Clark (Siskiyou 133, jeclark2@csuchico.edu)

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English 421: Advanced Fiction & Nonfiction Writing

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English 431: Theory/Practice in Tutor Comp

Instructor: Kim Jaxon

English 431 offers training and experience in the tutoring of students in composition. Paid positions in the English 30 Writing Workshop Program require successful completion of this course. 431 provides an introduction to theories and practices of writing instruction and is a recommended prerequisite for English 634: Teaching Academic Writing, the graduate course for teachers of English 130: Academic Writing.

English 431 includes a weekly seminar in which we attempt to understand what it means to teach and support the teaching of writing. While the course is closely connected to our first year writing program, particularly English 130 and English 30, we will think about our work with these spaces as cases that help us explore concepts in teaching and learning related to writing instruction. One unit of this four-unit course is a practicum, which requires you to intern in an English 30 workshop or the ESL Resource Center.  This practicum experience provides a rich resource for us to explore how to mentor student writing.

To get a feel for the course, you can check out our website: http://www.kimjaxon.com/engl431/

Class meets MW 4:00-5:15 in MLIB 442. Course #3074.

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English 441: Shakespeare

Professor: Robert O'Brien

'Tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings.

 

In this course, we'll read plays from four genres—comedy, history, tragedy, and romance—following Shakespeare's career, with digressions, from A Midsummer Night's Dream (1594-96) to The Winter's Tale (1609). Classes will be a mixture of lectures, discussions, and scene readings. You will write some short essays and a term paper and take an early-term and a final examination. Our text will be the two-volume edition of The Norton Shakespeare.


http://www.shakespeareflix.net

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English 456: The 19th-Century British Novel

Professor: Geoff Baker



“Novel Evidence: 19th-Century British Fiction and the Law”

 

What is the relationship between fiction and the law, in the British nineteenth century? As the eighteenth century gave way to the nineteenth, major developments occurred in a few keys areas in which both literature and the law were intimately invested: conceptions of human rights and the assumed legal relationship between the individual and society; evolving ideas of what counts as “evidence” and how detectives and the police are to perform their task; and even more basic notions of what we can know at all, in order to come to a judgment about other people and their alleged actions.

 

This course will explore these issues through reading, discussion, writing, and projects about key nineteenth-century essays, major novels and short stories of the period (including the first and most famous of British detective fictions, in Collins and Doyle), and more recent critical and theoretical evaluations of the relationship between literature and the law. In addition, later adaptations of a number of these texts, including shows like Sherlock and the various film renditions of Frankenstein, will permit us to ask how a shift in the medium affects the portrayal of evidence, human rights, the law in general, etc.

 

A few primary texts will be selected from:

  • Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility
  • Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
  • Charles Dickens, Bleak House
  • Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone
  • Anthony Trollope, The Eustace Diamonds or Phineas Redux
  • George Eliot, Middlemarch or The Mill on the Floss
  • Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes: Selected Stories

 

**This class fulfills the Later British requirement for the English Studies option; a Later Literature requirement for the Literature option; or an elective for English majors and minors.

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English 458: Early American Literature

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English 461: The Modern Novel: Major Developments in Narratology

Professor: Aiping Zhang

This course is intended as an in-depth and comparative study of some powerful but challenging novels by a group of influential and controversial authors. These novels were written in different languages and historical periods of modern times. Most of the selected texts have won prestigious awards, served as trend-setters during their time, and become masterpieces in novel writing. By exploring the daring experiments, monumental successes, and lofty failures in novelistic narratology, we will trace all the major developments, from modernism to post-postmodernism, that have made their unique contributions to establishing, shaping, and diversifying the writing and reading of the modern novel.

 

With this course, you may fulfill the requirement of “Comparative, Continental European, World, and Multicultural Literatures” for English Studies Option, or you may take it as one of the four courses in “Late Literature” for Literature Option.

 

Required texts

 

Heart of Darkness (1902), Joseph Conrad (UK)

The Trial (1925), Franz Kafka (Austria-Hungary)

The Sound and the Fury (1929), William Faulkner (US, a Nobel Laureate)

Pale Fire (1962), Vladimir Nabokov (Russian American)

One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), Gabriel García Márquez (Columbia, a Nobel Laureate)

Like Water for Chocolate (1989; 1992), Laura Esquivel (Mexico, an Ariel Award winner)

The Republic of Wine (1992; 2000), Mo Yan (China, a Nobel Laureate)

The Hours (1998), Michael Cunningham (US, A Pulitzer Prize winner0

Love (2003), Toni Morrison (US, a Nobel Laureate)

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English 464: World Literature Written in English

Professor: Rob Burton

A new genre of English Literature has developed in the last 3 or 4 decades that has received much critical attention, yet is difficult to categorize. Writers like Salman Rushdie, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Jhumpa Lahiri write in English yet do not necessarily originate from, or even identify with, England or America.  Sometimes they are classified as "Multicultural Writers" (because they embrace two or more national cultures); sometimes they are classified as "Postcolonial Writers" (because they originate from countries that have been subjected to European or American colonial practices); for the purposes of this course, we are calling them “World Writers Who Write in English.” In this course, we will examine the genre closely by reading several well-known (and controversial) literary examples, including Salman Rushdie's East West, Bessie Head’s A Question of Power, and Kazuo Ishiguro's An Artist of the Floating World.  

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English 471: Intsv Theo & Prac 2nd Lang Acq   

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English 475: History of the English Language

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English 489: History of the English Language

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English 499: History of the English Language

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English 534: Literature, Language, Composition: A Synthesis

Professor: Peter Kittle

This is the capstone course for the English Education option of the English major, and priority enrollment goes to students graduating in Spring 2014 or Fall 2014. The course will examine ways of synthesizing reading, writing, and language studies into coherent lesson units for English classes in middle schools, junior high schools, and high schools. Readings will include professional books and young adult literature; assignments will include reading responses, lesson plans, presentations, and portfolio curation. 

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