Fall 2014

The following are the course numbers of the classes offered through the English Department (listed within The University Catalog under ENGL). Each number will send you to a brief description of the course, when available.

130 130PI 203 220 240 252
258 260 261 264 276 277
278 279 320 321 327 332
333 335 338 340 341 342
350 353 355 364 371 372
375 431 441 448 451 454
459 467 470 471 476 477
478 646 652 692

English 130: Academic Writing

English 130I, “Academic Writing,” is a core General Education Foundation course (Area A2) that introduces you to the challenges of university level writing, reading, and critical thinking.  This course uses writing to develop your scholarly curiosity.  To do this, instructors focus on:

  • deepening your research skills,
  • developing your ability to read and respond to difficult texts, and,
  • most importantly, helping you through the writing process in a social, collaborative, revision-focused environment.

All writing-intensive GE courses require a minimum of 2,500 words, and students enrolled in English 130 or 130P must demonstrate the ability to criticize, analyze, and advocate ideas with persuasive force in writing. A grade of C- or better is needed to pass this course.

Depending on your instructor, the focus for research in English 130I varies. Your specific course may research issues in digital culture, identity, food, popular culture, or music, just to name a few of the options. The common thread among all sections is an inquiry-based approach to pursuing research questions that are interesting to students. 

(Back to Top)

English 130PI: Academic Writing

Please note: English 130PI is not offered every semester.

English 130I, “Academic Writing,” is a core General Education Foundation course (Area A2) that introduces you to the challenges of university level writing, reading, and critical thinking.  This course uses writing to develop your scholarly curiosity.  To do this, instructors focus on:

  • deepening your research skills,
  • developing your ability to read and respond to difficult texts, and,
  • most importantly, helping you through the writing process in a social, collaborative, revision-focused environment.

All writing-intensive GE courses require a minimum of 2,500 words, and students enrolled in English 130 or 130P must demonstrate the ability to criticize, analyze, and advocate ideas with persuasive force in writing. A grade of C- or better is needed to pass this course.

Depending on your instructor, the focus for research in English 130I varies. Your specific course may research issues in digital culture, identity, food, popular culture, or music, just to name a few of the options. The common thread among all sections is an inquiry-based approach to pursuing research questions that are interesting to students. 

(Back to Top)

English 203: Shakespeare On Film

Instructor: Robert O'Brien

From the silent-movie era to the present, filmmakers have interpreted Shakespearean drama. Some interpretations have been lost, others are of dubious quality, but many are masterpieces of cinematic art. In this course, you'll study some of the best Shakespeare films made since the Second World War. By the end of the semester, you'll have gained a deeper understanding of both film and Shakespearean drama.

Classes will be a mixture of lectures, discussions, and film showings. Outside of class, you'll read synopses, scenes, and passages from the plays. You'll also write essays responding to the readings and films and take mid-term and final examinations. Our text will be the two-volume edition of The Norton Shakespeare.

The course may be taken as an elective or to satisfy the General Education arts requirement.

http://www.shakespeareflix.net

(Back to Top)

English 220: Beginning Creative Writing


(Back to Top)

English 240: Literature of Life

Professor: Sandra Flake 

In this course, we will read and discuss literature from various nations and cultures, with an emphasis on the relationships of these works to our lives and current events:  what can these works tell us about how different societies function, about relationships between and among people, about human behavior?  What can we learn about our own and others’ lives from what we read? Where does personal responsibility come in?  The required reading will include outstanding works of fiction, poetry and drama by American and international writers, and class will be focused primarily on discussion, with occasional quizzes and group assignments.  Students will also write responses to themes and issues raised by the reading and complete two projects.

Literature for Life is an approved General Education course in Lifelong Learning (area e), and it is included in two of the General Education Pathways in which students can complete an interdisciplinary minor:  1) Ethics, Justice, and Policy and 2) Great Books and Ideas.

 (Back to Top)

English 252: American Indian Literature

Professor: Sandra Flake

In this course, we will read and discuss works drawn from the wide range of Native American Literatures.  Our readings will range from pre-contact texts to contemporary American Indian writing. We will consider both oral and written texts, drawn from a variety of genres including songs, chants, stories, autobiography, film, novels and poetry.  In addition, this course will help to develop an understanding of the critical concerns raised by cross-cultural reading.  Although our orientation will be primarily literary, we will also weave cultural, historical, political, ecological and spiritual dimensions into our discussions. Classes will include discussion, some lecture, some oral reading, with occasional quizzes and group work.  You will write some brief responses to the reading and complete projects/papers and exams.        

American Indian Literatures is an approved General Education course in Humanities (area c-2), and it is included in one of the General Education Pathways in which students can complete an interdisciplinary minor, Sustainability Studies.

 (Back to Top)

English 258: World Literature

Professor: Rob Burton

English 258 uses various technology tools (such as Blogs and PowerPoints) as a way of encouraging students to discuss and write about contemporary world authors such as Kukrit Pramoj (Thailand) and Nawal el Saadawi (Egypt). It is a Writing Intensive (WI) course in the Global Development Pathway (Area C-2). 

 (Back to Top)

English 260: Great Books

Professor: Geoff Baker

The goal of this course is to introduce you some great novels, poetry, drama, and non-fiction prose, a body of work that stretches back thousands of years. On your own, you will be expected to read each text carefully. As a class, we will attempt to place each work in its larger context and see what it seems to want to say to its reader and what tools it uses to say it. Grades will be based on a few short writing assignments on Vista, a midterm, a final exam, and an analytical paper.

Texts will be chosen from, for example, Confucius, Plato, Dante’s Inferno, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables, poetry by Rainer Maria Rilke, etc. You can contact Geoff Baker during the summer for the final reading list at gabaker at csuchico dot edu.

(Back to Top)

English 261: Women in Hip Hop (Women Writers)

Professor: Tracy Butts

Hip Hop is a multi-billion dollar global phenomenon encompassing more than just Rap music.  For many, Hip Hop is a movement, a way of life, influencing all aspects of culture including belief systems, attitudes, language, arts, politics, fashion, and technology.  ENGL 261 (Women Writers) will focus on the ways women’s lives have shaped and been shaped by Hip Hop culture with regard to gender roles, sexual identity and expression, socio-economic status, and ethnic and/or religious identities through an examination of literature (novels, narratives, memoirs, interviews, essays, criticism, and song lyrics) written by and about women in Hip Hop.   

Possible texts include all of or excerpts from:

Patricia Hill Collins’s From Black Power to Hip Hop: Racism, Nationalism, and Feminism

Gwendolyn Pough’s Home Girls Make Some Noise: Hip Hop Feminism Anthology

Karrine Steffans’s Confessions of a Video Vixen

T. Denean Sharpley Whiting’s Pimps Up, Ho’s Down: Hip Hop’s Hold on Young Black Women

Joan Morgan’s When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost

Sista Souljah’s The Coldest Winter Ever

Lyrics by Queen Latifah, Missy Elliott, M.I.A., Lauryn Hill, Lil Kim, Beyonce, Soosan Firooz, Ms. Krazie, etc.

This class meets the following General Education requirements: Humanities.

(Back to Top)

English 264: Amer Eth/Reg Writers-WI

(Back to Top)

English 276: Survey of Early British Lit

Professor: Robert O'Brien

This course will introduce you to a millennium of British literature, from the eighth century through the eighteenth. Classes will be a mixture of lectures and discussion; you will write some short essays and a term paper and take a mid-term and final examination. Our texts will include volumes A, B, and C of The Norton Anthology of English Literature (2012).

(Back to Top)

English 277: Survey of Later British Lit

Professor: Teresa Traver

This course provides an overview of two centuries of literature, from the Romantic era to the dawn of the twenty-first century. We will also explore the historical and cultural contexts that shaped the literature of these time periods. Readings will include poetry, non-fiction prose, drama, and both short and long fiction. Note: In this class, rather than writing one or two “major” papers, you will produce a series of two-page argumentative papers in response to specific prompts. Assignments also include occasional discussion posts, in-class writing assignments, a mid-term and a final exam. Class participation and attendance are required.

Required Texts: (Subject to change) Broadview Anthology of British Literature Concise Volume B; The Longman’s edition of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey; E.M. Forster’s Passage to India.

(Back to Top)

English 278: Survey of Early American Lit

Instructor: 

(Back to Top)

English 279: Survey of Later American Lit

Professor: Aiping Zhang

This course is a survey of American literature between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of the Jazz Age. We will start the course with an overview of the historical and cultural context, in which American literature transformed itself through a series of major literary experiments. By reading representative texts in various genres, we will study a very diverse group of authors who made key contributions to the development of the “Local Color” Writing, Native American Folklore, American Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, Lost Generation, and African American literature during this period. Voluntary presentations will be organized to encourage the students' participation in discussion.

READING LIST

The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vols. C and D, 8th Edition

(Back to Top)

English 320: Poetry Writing

Professor: Jeanne Clark

The aim of this course is to make you a better writer of poetry by making you a better reader of poetry.  Reading poetry—and writing it—is a matter of paying attention, of being alive to the possibilities of language, of learning to appreciate craft, and allowing the poem to be what it wants to be, and all it can be, in combining and reacting with the speaker’s sensibility.  You will read poems by both established and up-and-coming poets, representing a wide constellation of voices, approaches, and subjects. 

Each week you’ll complete a poem draft—writing (or rewriting) a poem in response to an instructor prompt.  We’ll read poems—yours and those of well-known and emerging poets—and talk about what we find there in terms of news and craft.  We’ll experiment with revision and talk about the art of submitting work for publication.  Some of the scheduled class periods will be devoted to reading and to craft issues, and some will be devoted to “workshopping” your poems.  The “fifth hour” will be used for alternative activities, both individual and small group activities rather than whole class meetings: visiting art galleries, sauntering through woodlands, talking with visiting writers about writing and the writing life, and so on.

Questions?  Contact Jeanne Clark (Siskiyou 133), jeclark2@csuchico.edu

(Back to Top)

English 321: Fiction Writing

Instructor: Rob Davidson

English 321 is an intensive workshop-based course in the writing of the short story. You will be asked to write “literary” work in this class (i.e., work that is serious, ambitious, well-crafted, contemporary, adult-oriented, emotionally engaging, and so forth). Work that does not aspire to the literary is outside the domain of this class. This includes literature for children, the sentimental romance, formulaic mystery writing, and the like. We shall study writing techniques and craft by reading each other’s work and by studying the work of established authors. Expect to do a lot of writing and revision.

Please note that this course is specifically designed with the short story in mind. For the purposes of this class, we will define a short story as a self-contained fictional prose narrative that does not exceed 5,000 words (about twenty double-spaced pages). “Long” short stories, novellas, and novel excerpts are outside the domain of this class.


Required Text (subject to change)

Boyle, T. Coraghessan, ed. Doubletakes: Pairs of Contemporary Short Stories. Boston: Thomson-Wadsworth, 2004.

(Back to Top)

English 327: Creative Nonfiction

Fall 2014, MWF 11-11:50 and M 2-2:50

4 units

Instructor: Dr. Paul Eggers

Creative nonfiction is the kind of writing you’ll find in magazines such as The New Yorker, as well as in memoirs and investigative journalism. It’s “nonfiction” in that it’s fact-based, exploring real-life events and experiences (especially your own); and it’s “creative” in that it recognizes and makes use of the writer’s presence and imagination, and the unreliability of memory. This kind of writing leads to interesting essays that draw upon the writer’s own life and engagement with the outside world. It tells the truth—the real, not-made-up truth—but it sculpts that truth, making the truth vivid and convincing, using the same techniques fiction writers use.

            We’ll likely do three kinds of creative nonfiction: memoir, personal essay, and literary journalism (we’ll also discuss what these labels actually mean). We’ll draft the stories first, then workshop them, then revise them. Along the way we’ll discuss theoretical matters—e.g., is objectivity possible? how reliable is memory?—and we’ll do idea-generation and drafting work, as well as read and discuss the writing of some of our best creative nonfiction writers, including Truman Capote, Norman Mailler, Annie Dillard, and others. No tests and no final.

            For our text, we’ll use Bill Roorbach’s Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: The Art of Truth; additionally, I’ll pass out relevant articles along the way.

English 332: Intro to Literacy Studies

Professor: Tom Fox

English 332 introduces you to the interdisciplinary field of literacy studies. We will look at historical and current discussions that play out in our culture around the uses of literacy. We’ll especially explore digital literacy and consider how technology has rapidly changed the ways that literacy is used and understood. We will also pay particular attention to adolescent literacy, including adolescents’ use of digital platforms.

Questions we will consider: What is the nature of literacy? What is the relationship between language and thought? Between literacy and learning? What is the relationship between literacy and schooling? And what is the relationship between literacy and social, economic, and political development? We will work toward an understanding of literacy as enabling rather than causal, as embedded within society, and as depending for its meaning and practice upon social institutions and conditions.

Internship for English Education Majors: If you are an English Education major, this course also requires that you complete your 45-hour practicum as part of the work of the class. You will enroll in English 489 and receive 1 unit of credit for this internship. You will be placed in local secondary school settings through CAVE. CAVE will present an orientation to get you ready for this placement and help you gain clearance to work in local schools. We’ll discuss this on the first day of class; no need to do anything prior to class.

(Back to Top)

English 333: Adv. Comp. for Future Teachers

Professor: Peter Kittle (Sections 03 and 72)

Advanced Composition for Future Teachers is designed for future multiple-subject teachers. The two primary goals of the class are related: the improvement of your own writing, and the increase of your knowledge about the ways writing can be effectively taught in elementary school classrooms. Over the course of the semester, you can expect to read professional books and articles about the teaching of writing, while conducting self-designed research and composition projects. Course work will include weekly reading responses, multimodal and technology-facilitated composition projects, and a culminating research project.

(Back to Top)

English 335: Rhetoric and Writing

English 338: Environmental Rhetoric

(Back to Top)

English 340: Approaches to Literary Genres

Professor: John Traver (Section 01)

This course introduces you to several literary genres (fiction, poetry, and drama) and provides you with a set of analytical skills and strategies for interpreting literary texts.  You will learn to recognize common genre conventions, as well as how skilled authors may work within (or even defy) these conventions in ways which surprise us.  You will also become familiar with common literary terminology and learn how to construct an effective literary argument.

Note:  because this course provides important preparation for the English major, it will be writing intensive.  Assignments will include the following:  a midterm and a final; two papers; shorter writing assignments (such as postings on Blackboard); quizzes; memorization of one poem of your choice; class participation.

Required texts: 

Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, ed. Peter G. Beidler (3rd edition). 

The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature, ed. Michael Meyer.

Professor: Geoff Baker (Section 02)

The goal of this course is to introduce you to the tools we use to read, analyze and discuss the three primary literary genres of poetry, drama, and fiction. We’ll be reading a diverse and fascinating cross-section of traditional and modern poems, theatrical tragedy and comedy, and fiction short and long. Along the way, we’ll become familiar with the terminology used to dig into literature and to explain what it does, why it does it, and why we value it.

Course texts:
Meyer, ed. The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing, MUST BE 8th edition.  ISBN: 0312469594

(Back to Top)

English 341: Reading Lit for Future Tchrs

Professor: Kim Jaxon (Section 01)

This course is required of all Liberal Studies majors, but open to all students. As the title of the course, “Reading Literature,” suggests, students will read an array of literary genres, including short stories, novels, poetry, and drama. Students will also read books and articles by teacher-researchers about reading pedagogy. By the conclusion of the term, students will be able to read a wide array of literary texts, both those written for adult readers and those written for younger readers; students will be able to identify literary devices and consider their effects; students will be able to select literature for children to read and develop teaching plans to help students read literary texts with understanding and pleasure. Students will demonstrate their learning through successful presentations/performances, group projects, and written/visual assignments. This course addresses the literary study areas specified by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing as requirements for multiple-subject teachers: literary concepts and conventions; literary genres; interpretation of literary texts. Our section has what I hope will be a “choose your own adventure” feel to it; you’ll choose many of your texts for the semester from a curated list.

To get a feel for the course, you can check out our website: http://www.kimjaxon.com/engl341/

Class meets MW 5:30-6:45 in Langdon 300. Course #5822.

Professor: Peter Kittle (Sections 02 and 72)

Reading Literature for Future Teachers is designed for future multiple-subject teachers. This class is structured to expose you to current thinking about the teaching of literature in elementary schools while simultaneously allowing you to read widely in a variety of genres. We will read some of the literary texts together as a class, but you will also have the opportunity to select many readings on your own. Course work will be primarily project-based, with several small assignments, three larger projects, and a final exam.

(Back to Top)

English 342: Literature of the Child

Professor: Teresa Traver

Literature of the Child is an introduction to literature written for or about children.  Our readings draw from three centuries of literary depictions of children. As part of the Health and Wellness pathway, this course emphasizes the following dimensions of wellness: emotional, social, spiritual and intellectual. As we examine didactic texts from previous centuries, we may ask what role such literature plays in developing children’s intellectual and spiritual wellbeing. Other texts we’ll read focus on children as embodied beings, raising questions about physical, emotional and social health. Assignments include a paper with multiple drafts, a presentation, online journal entries, a midterm and a final exam. Class participation and attendance are required.

Required Texts: (Subject to change): J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan; Francis Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden; J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone; Judie Blume’s Are You There God? It’s me, Margaret; and R.J. Palacio’s Wonder.

(Back to Top)

English 342I: Literature of the Child (Writing Intensive)

Professor: Teresa Traver

Literature of the Child is an introduction to literature written for or about children.  Our readings draw from three centuries of literary depictions of children. Some of the questions we’ll pose include: what is the purpose of children’s literature? Why arechildren depicted the way they are in literature? What kinds of things does this literature suggest about the role of the developing child in relation to the family, the local community, the environment, and the wider world? Assignments include two papers with multiple drafts, eight journal entries, oral presentations, a midterm and a final exam. (Note: this class does require more writing than the regular section, but it is a smaller class that allows more lively interaction, so I highly recommend it to English majors interested in children’s literature.) Class participation and attendance are required.

Required Texts: (Subject to change): J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan; Mildred Taylor’s Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry; Francis Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden; Judie Blume’s Are You There God? It’s me, Margaret; and and R.J. Palacio’s Wonder.

English 350: Science, Technology and Lit

(Back to Top)

English 353: Multicultural Literature

Professor: Rob Burton

English 353 uses various technology tools (such as Blogs and PowerPoints) as a way of encouraging students to discuss and write about contemporary Multicultural Literature, from the essays of Andrew Lam (Vietnam-U.S.) to the short stories of Jhumpa Lahiri (India-U.S.). It is a GE Upper Division Area C course (Arts and Humanities) in the Global Development Studies Pathway.

(Back to Top)

English 354: Classical Literature

(Back to Top)

English 355: Bible, Lit, and Culture

Professor: John Traver

Why do President Obama’s speeches positively reference a “brother’s keeper?”  Why does the narrator of Moby Dick want to be called “Ishmael?” In John Milton’s Paradise Lost, how much of the “story” is of his own invention? To answer such questions, readers need a shared familiarity with the Bible that many writers and thinkers have taken for granted.

This course will provide you with a working knowledge of the structure and themes of the Bible to help you recognize allusions and perceive its influence on the shape of English literature and the broader culture; we’ll look at the Bible alongside examples of the texts it has influenced. We’ll also examine the genres and literary qualities of the Bible itself, such as its use of symbols, typology, repetition, acrostics, and even puns! Our goals are to have a greater appreciation of the Bible as a work of literature in itself and to understand its profound effect on the shape of subsequent literature and culture.

Note that this class fulfills either the genre or period requirement for the English major or as an upper-division arts and humanities GE requirement for a variety of majors.  All levels of familiarity with the Bible are welcome (from none, to knowledgeable).  We will be reading in translation selections from the Hebrew Bible (or “Old Testament”), the New Testament, and the deuterocanonical works (or “Apocrypha”).  Texts will include:


 Norton Critical Edition, The English Bible, King James Version, 2 volumes.

(Back to Top)

English 356: Literature, Politics, and Activism

(Back to Top)

English 364: American Ethnic & Reg Lit - Asian American Literature (Writing Intensive)

Professor: Tracy Butts

ENGL 364 explores the way place, socio-economic status, gender, and sexuality inform and inflect the experience of particular cultural groups set against the larger American culture.  Classes typically focus on African American, Asian American, Chican@, or Native American literature.  Our focus this semester is Asian American literature.  We will be reading a wide range of literary genres—essays, short stories, novels, and poems—all written by authors of Chinese American, Japanese American, and Hmong American descent.  

Texts likely will include:

The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston

The Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford

Seventeen Syllables by Hisaye Yamamoto

A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki

How Do I Begin: A Hmong American Literary Anthology

The Tenth Month: A Hmong Love Novel by Thao

The Late Homecomer: A Hmong Family Memoir by Kao Kalia Yang

This class meets the following General Education Requirements: Upper-Division Arts/Humanities, Writing Intensive, and U. S. Diversity Course.  

(Back to Top)
 

English 364I: American Ethnic & Reg Lit - African American Literature (Writing Intensive)

Professor: Tracy Butts

ENGL 364 explores the way place, socio-economic status, gender, and sexuality inform and inflect the experience of particular cultural groups set against the larger American culture.  Classes typically focus on African American, Asian American, Chican@, or Native American literature.  Our focus this semester is African American literature.  Beginning with Octavia Butler’s Kindred and ending with Chimamanda Adichie’s Americanah, we will examine American slavery, its enduring legacy and impact on the social constructions of race, class, gender, and sexual identity and expression in order to answer the question, “What does it mean to be Black in America?”

Texts likely will include:

Octavia Butler’s Kindred

Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God

Gwendolyn Brooks’s Maud Martha

Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man or Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon

Gloria Naylor’s Linden Hills

Daniel Black’s Perfect Peace

Chimamanda Adichie’s Americanah

This class meets the following General Education Requirements: Upper-Division Arts/Humanities, Writing Intensive, and U. S. Diversity Course

(Back to Top)

English 371: Principles of Language

(Back to Top)

English 372: Pedagogical Grammar

(Back to Top)

English 375: Introduction to Engl Grammar

(Back to Top)

English 431: Theory/Practice in Tutor Comp

Instructor: Kim Jaxon

English 431 offers training and experience in the tutoring of students in composition. Paid positions in the English 30 Writing Workshop Program require successful completion of this course. 431 provides an introduction to theories and practices of writing instruction and is a recommended prerequisite for English 634: Teaching Academic Writing, the graduate course for teachers of English 130: Academic Writing.

English 431 includes a weekly seminar in which we attempt to understand what it means to teach and support the teaching of writing. While the course is closely connected to our first year writing program, particularly English 130 and English 30, we will think about our work with these spaces as cases that help us explore concepts in teaching and learning related to writing instruction. One unit of this four-unit course is a practicum, which requires you to intern in an English 30 workshop or the ESL Resource Center.  This practicum experience provides a rich resource for us to explore how to mentor student writing.

To get a feel for the course, you can check out our website: http://www.kimjaxon.com/engl431/

Class meets MW 4:00-5:15 in MLIB 442. Course #3074.

(Back to Top)

English 441: Shakespeare

Professor: Robert O'Brien

'Tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings. 

In this course, we'll read plays from four genres—comedy, history, tragedy, and romance—following Shakespeare's career, with digressions, from A Midsummer Night's Dream (1594-96) to The Winter's Tale (1609). Classes will be a mixture of lectures, discussions, and scene readings. You will write some short essays and a term paper and take an early-term and a final examination. Our text will be the two-volume edition of The Norton Shakespeare.

http://www.shakespeareflix.net

(Back to Top)

English 448: The Long Eighteenth Century

Professor: John Traver

This course introduces you to a broad survey of Restoration and eighteenth-century British literature and its social, political, and religious contexts.  You will encounter a variety of eighteenth-century texts (e.g., novels, poems, dramas, sequential art, essays, songs, and even newspapers), all of which participate together in a broader cultural conversation.  We will struggle with the question, “Just what is the long eighteenth century?” as we encounter a singing highwayman, a man disguised as a eunuch to attract women, an imagined love poem to an actual eunuch, the discovery that both men and women use the bathroom, a world populated by “fish men” and “worm men,” fire and plague (literally), revolution, persecution, and the flowering of cat poetry.

Assignments will include the following:  a mid-term and a final; one short paper and one longer paper; short writing assignments; a class presentation; memorization of one poem of your choice; class participation.

Required Texts

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 3, The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century (2nd ed.).

Henry Fielding, Joseph Andrews/Shamela, Penguin.

(Back to Top)

English 450: The Victorian Period

Professor: Teresa Traver

Queen Victoria reigned from 1837 to 1901, a time when many of works we now think of as “classics” of British literature appeared. This course provides students with exposure to (and understanding) of the literature and culture of the Victorian era. We’ll read a broad range of Victorian literature, including non-fiction prose (essays), poetry, drama, and both short and long fiction, but we will also pay attention to the broader cultural context in which these literary works appear. The course will also familiarize you with some of the kinds of criticism produced by Victorian studies scholars. Assignments include a mid-term and final exam; two papers; additional short assignments and occasional quizzes. Class participation and attendance are required.

Required Texts: (Subject to change)

Broadview Anthology of British Literature: The Victorian Era; Emily Brontë Wuthering Heights; (Bedford Edition); Sir Arthur Conan Doyle The Sign of Four (Dover Thrift);

Plays by Tom Taylor (Cambridge). 

(Back to Top)

English 451: Modern Poetry

Professor: Jeanne Clark

Welcome!  This is an upper-division genre course. It is a course in which we will labor to learn more about the genre of poetry: how poems/poets begat poems/poets, what terrains poets consider worth fighting for, how poems discover and shape meaning, as well as why and how we might respond to poetry reflectively, critically, and imaginatively.  This course is an exploration of full-length collections of poems, books by a diverse range of modern and contemporary poets.  We will consider the tools these poets use to make poems.  These tools will include various forms /poetic structures and specific poetic strategies such as meter, metaphor, and mousse.  Oops, I’m confusing poetry with desert, a simple enough mistake.  Further, in this course we will labor to become a generous and spirited reading and writing community, one in which we’ll work both individually and in collaborative groups to wrestle this angel of poetry into our arms. 

(Back to Top)

English 454: Comparative Literature

Professor: Geoff Baker

Keeping It Unreal: Fiction and the Supernatural from Frankenstein to Stephen King

This course begins at the pivotal moment in Western culture when a certain idea of what is “natural”—or possible in the natural world as we generally know it—begins to take root. It is only at this point that any idea of a “supernatural”—or what is not possible in the natural world as we know it—begins to be articulated. Authors will go on to use the tension between what is real and unreal, what is natural and supernatural, in a variety of ways: for the readerly pleasures of terror and suspense; as allegories of personal or political or social trauma; as problematic symbols of allegedly dangerous foreignness or femininity; and perhaps also as a site from which the oppressed “foreign” or “feminine” can fight back.

Some of the questions we might ask and answer:

  • Why does the popularity of the supernatural overlap with the process of secularization in western culture, what sociologist Max Weber called in 1918 the “disenchantment of the world”? Is the desire for the “unreal” only possible in an era that no longer “believes”?
  • Why and how does western literature in the age of imperialism represent the supernatural as foreign or the foreign as supernatural? Does non-western literature embrace this arrangement as well?
  • Why and how do authors use spectral figures to embody real political traumas?
  • Are the rise and popularity of the fantastic merely natural fictional responses to very real cultural shifts? How might we account for the popularity, today, of Rowling’s Harry Potter series and Meyer’s Twilight novels? What needs do these works satisfy in us?

Brief excerpts from essays by John Locke, David Hume, Anna Letitia Aikin, Immanuel Kant, William Wordsworth, Simone de Beauvoir, Ashis Nandy, etc.

Fiction chosen from:

Mary Shelley (Frankenstein!)

E.T.A. Hoffmann (“The Sandman”)

Washington Irving (headless dude!)

Honoré de Balzac (a talisman grants your wishes but kills you!)

Edgar Allen Poe

H. Rider Haggard (just like Indiana Jones!)

Bram Stoker (Dracula!)

Franz Kafka (dude becomes cockroach!)

Alejo Carpentier (magical realism!)

Karen Blixen

Toni Morrison

Tayeb Salih

Isabel Allende (magical realism!)

Stephen King (Carrie!)

*This course fills a Later Literature requirement for the Literature option; and either the Comparative, Continental, etc. or Elective category for English Studies.

*ENGL 454 can be taken more than once for major credit, if the syllabi are different. So, if you took “Novels of Development” in Fall 2011, you can still take this class and get credit for it.

(Back to Top)

English 455: The 18th- Century Bristish Eighteenth Century British Novel

Professor: 

(Back to Top)

English 457: The American Novel

(Back to Top)

 

English 459: Later American Literature

Instructor: Rob Davidson

With the advent of the 20th century, the end of Victorianism, and the entrance into a World War, a profound shift occurred in American fiction. This class will examine the form of the literary short story as it evolved through modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, social realism, the mid-century Southern Gothic, postmodernism, minimalism, and more. Readings will focus on complete, stand-alone collections of short stories—a selection of seminal works & major  masterpieces. Relevant criticism and secondary materials will also be required course readings. One shorter paper, a longer research-based paper, and two exams.

Reading List (subject to change)

Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio (1919); Jean Toomer, Cane (1923); Ernest Hemingway, In Our Time (1925); Katherine Anne Porter, Flowering Judas (1935); Eudora Welty, A Curtain of Green (1941); Flannery O’Connor, A Good Man is Hard to Find (1955); James Baldwin, Going to Meet the Man (1965); Raymond Carver, What We Talk About When We Talk About Love (1981); Lydia Davis, Break it Down (1986); Junot Díaz, Drown (1996).


English 459: Later American Literature

English 462: Study in Major Amer Authors

Professor: Tracy Butts

According to scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr., “. . . at the ages of twenty-eight and twenty-nine respectively, [Langston] Hughes and [Zora Neale] Hurston bore every promise of reshaping completely the direction of the development of African-American literature away from the blind imitation of American literature and toward a bold and vibrant synthesis of formal American literature and African-American vernacular.”  Although their eagerly anticipated collaborative project, Mule Bone: A Comedy of Negro Life, was projected to catapult Hughes and Hurston to fame, instead “the authors fell out,” ending a wonderful personal and professional relationship. Scholars wonder what could have been had the two managed to partner together successfully; however, what we do know is that Hurston and Hughes, two of the most prolific and well-known authors of the Harlem Renaissance, would go on to individually reshape both the African American and American literary traditions through their literary innovation and experimentation, portrayal of the folk and black culture, use of humor and dialect as well as the blues and jazz aesthetics. 

Texts likely will include:

Mule Bone: A Comedy of Negro Life by Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes

Jonah’s Gourd Vine by Zora Neale Hurston

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Mules and Men by Zora Neale Hurston

Spunk: The Selected Short Stories of Zora Neale Hurston

The Collected Poetry of Langston Hughes

Not Without Laughter: A Novel by Langston Hughes

The Ways of White Folks by Langston Hughes

The Best of Simple by Langston Hughes

(Back to Top)

English 468: 20th- Cent & Contemp Brit Lit

(Back to Top)

English 470: Second Language Acquisition   

(Back to Top)

English 471: Intsv Theo & Prac 2nd Lang Acq   

(Back to Top)

English 476: Phonological Analysis

English 478: Linguistic Approaches to Reading

Professor: Peter Kittle

Linguistic Approaches to Reading is designed for students interested in language, literacy, and pedagogy. Using research from a variety of disciplines including psycholinguistics, we will examine current theories about reading comprehension and apply those theories in self-designed inquiry projects. Course work will include reading responses, group presentations, an inquiry project, and a final exam.

(Back to Top)