Spring 2008

The following are the course numbers of the classes offered through the English Department (listed within The University Catalog under ENGL). Each number will send you to a brief description of the course, when available.
130 203 220 230 240 251
252 253 254 258 260 264
315 321 327 333 335 340
341 342 353 354 355 356
357 358 359 360 371 375
419 420 421 431 440 441
448 453 456 458 459 461
462 465 467 470
471
473
474
478
519
534


English 130: Academic Writing

Section(s): 4, 7, 10, 42
Professor: Danielle Alexich

This writing course invites you to look closely at American (and world) culture- from its dreams and accomplishments to its illusions and crimes and then back again. You will consider the fringe-dwellers, rebels and visionaries-all within a context of effective writing. Your semester will open with an exploration of the power of language and then continue with writing assignments (both reading responses and formal essays) that encourage a growing understanding of disparate people and relationships. Through a process of wide reading, critical reflection, open dialogue and writing, you will investigate diverse opinions and perspectives, discover shared values and improve the presentation of your ideas.

Section(s): 5, 39, 40
Professor: Susan Aylworth

As described in the University Catalog, this course offers you, “Instruction and practice in writing university-level expository prose.” Thus English 130 will introduce you to tools for close reading and rhetorical analysis of both written and visual texts and will help you develop and practice your skills at developing these texts. My goals for this course are:

  1. To help you develop skills for reading and analysis of college-level texts, both written and visual;
  2. To give you practice and opportunities to develop your own skills in writing academic prose at a college level;
  3. To help you understand why some documents communicate successfully and others do not;
  4. To give you the skills to produce successful academic documents.

Most reading, research and writing will be done outside of class with communication through WebCT Vista. Class time will be a mix of large group discussion, small group and individual work on reading, research, writing and revision, formal and informal in-class presentations and, rarely, lecture.

Texts:

  • Samuel Cohen, 50 Essays: A Portable Anthology, 2nd ed., Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2007.
  • Andrea Lunsford, Easy Writer, Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2006.
  • Tracy Kidder, Mountains Beyond Mountains, Random House, 2003. (This is the Chico State Book in Common for this year. Find it in the Galleria section of the bookstore.)

You will participate in the Town Hall meeting at the end of the term.

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Section(s): 19, 41
Professor: Kim Jaxon

English 130, “Academic Writing,” is a core General Education course that introduces you to the challenges of university-level writing, reading, and critical thinking. This course uses writing to develop your scholarly curiosity. To do this, instructors focus on deepening your research skills, developing your ability to read and respond to difficult texts, and helping you through the writing process in a social, collaborative, revision-focused environment. All writing-intensive GE courses require a minimum of 2,500 words, and students enrolled in English 130 must demonstrate the ability to criticize, analyze, and advocate ideas with persuasive force in writing. A grade of C- or better is needed to pass this course.

English 130 asks you to write a lot—to examine issues that you care deeply about, and to write about issues that have relevance for the time in which we live. With the broad focus of civic engagement as our focus, our section of 130 asks you to use writing to inquire into the current issues of interest to our campus community. This work will be taking place in other English 130 sections as well, and will have as their culminating work a Chico State Town Hall Meeting on University Concerns. Students in these sections will facilitate and participate in the discussion groups on issues you have researched and written about.

Texts:

  • Hacker, Diana, The Pocket Style Manual, Bedford/St. Martins, 2004

Section(s): 2, 17
Professor: Mary Ann Latimer

English 130, “Academic Writing,” is a core General Education course that introduces you to the challenges of university-level writing, reading, and critical thinking. This course uses writing to develop your scholarly curiosity. To do this, instructors focus on deepening your research skills, developing your ability to read and respond to difficult texts, and helping you through the writing process in a social, collaborative, revision-focused environment. All writing-intensive GE courses require a minimum of 2,500 words, and students enrolled in English 130 must demonstrate the ability to criticize, analyze, and advocate ideas with persuasive force in writing. A grade of C- or better is needed to pass this course.

English 130 asks you to write a lot—to examine issues that you care deeply about, and to write about issues that have relevance for the time in which we live. Along with Chico State, colleges across the country are asking students to think about the health of our democracy, the goals of our nation, and how our personal, scholarly and civic identities inter-relate. Universities see themselves as having a social responsibility to respond to the larger debates of our time, and certainly our culture is debating vigorously issues of rights, freedoms, and civic responsibility as it exists at home and extends globally. With the broad topic of civic engagement as our focus, our section of 130 asks you to use writing to inquire into the current issues of interest to our campus and local community. This work will be taking place in twenty other English 130 sections as well, and will have as their culminating work a Chico State Town Hall Meeting on University Concerns in November. Students in these sections will facilitate and participate in the discussion groups on issues you have researched and written about.

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Section(s): 11, 38
Professor: David Martins

English 130 asks you to write a lot—to examine issues that you care deeply about, and to write about issues that have relevance for the time in which we live. Along with Chico State, colleges across the country are asking students to think about the health of our democracy, the goals of our nation, and how our personal, scholarly and civic identities inter-relate. Universities see themselves as having a social responsibility to respond to the larger debates of our time, and certainly our culture is debating vigorously issues of rights, freedoms, and civic responsibility as it exists at home and extends globally. This is the challenge that the writer Terry Tempest Williams’ offers us in the quote above: how can we use the skills we learn in the university to better understand what positive role we want to play in the communities we identify with?

With the broad topic of civic engagement as our focus, our section of 130 asks you to use writing to inquire into the current issues of interest to our campus and local community. This work will be taking place in twenty other English 130 sections as well, and will have as their culminating work a Chico State Town Hall Meeting on University Concerns in May. Students in these sections will facilitate and participate in the discussion groups on issues you have researched and written about.

Section(s): 30, 33
Professor: Steve Metzger

This is a writing course that asks you to look closely at the American experience--from a historical, sociological, political, literary, cultural, and personal perspective. Whether you are a first-generation American from El Salvador or are full-blooded Cherokee, whether your ancestors passed through Ellis Island or fled Vietnam, or even if you’re just studying in the United States with plans to return to your home country, you are part of the American experience. In this course, we will be examining that experience. We will read, write, and talk about its relevance in today’s world. What does it mean to say, “I am an American” “I’m proud to be an American,” or, “I am studying at an American university?” What responsibilities do those claims bring with them?

Specifically, we will be using American music as a metaphor for the American experience, by looking at forms of music that are uniquely and definitively American. We will look through jazz and blues at the African American experience, through “hillbilly” music at the Scotch-Irish American experience, and through folk, rock ‘n’ roll, rap, and hip hop at the experience of American youth, rebellion, and revolution.

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Sections(s): 31, 45, 46
Professor: Jill Swiencicki

English 130 asks you to write a lot—to examine issues that you care deeply about, and to write about issues that have relevance for the time in which we live. Along with Chico State, colleges across the country are asking students to think about the health of our democracy, the goals of our nation, and how our personal, scholarly and civic identities inter-relate. Universities see themselves as having a social responsibility to respond to the larger debates of our time, and certainly our culture is debating vigorously issues of rights, freedoms, and civic responsibility as it exists at home and extends globally. This is the challenge that the writer Terry Tempest Williams’ offers us: how can we use the skills we learn in the University to better understand what positive role we want to play in the communities we identify with?

With the broad topic of civic engagement as our focus, our section of 130 asks you to use writing to inquire into the current issues of interest to our campus and local community. This work will be taking place in twenty other English 130 sections as well, and will have as their culminating work a Chico State Town Hall Meeting on University Concerns in May. Students in these sections will facilitate and participate in the discussion groups on issues you have researched and written about.

Sections(s): 15, 18, 29, 32
Professor: Jennifer Vinsky

This course provides “Instruction and practice in writing university-level expository prose.” In this class, you and your peers will research, read, think, talk, and write critically about a wide variety of texts related to a topic of your choosing, gaining extensive practice in “drawing from, commenting on, adding to” the work of others, as compositionist Joseph Harris says, formulating a new line of thinking that emerges from your inquiry. Much of class time will be devoted to looking closely at how texts are constructed—the moves academic writers make as they write in response to other texts—and to creating, responding to, and revising original drafts. Common readings will be posted online through ERes. Course materials will be posted on WEBCTVista.

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Sections(s): 44
Professor: Thia Wolf

English 130 asks you to write a lot—to examine issues that you care deeply about, and to write about issues that have relevance for the time in which we live. Along with Chico State, colleges across the country are asking students to think about the health of our democracy, the goals of our nation, and how our personal, scholarly and civic identities inter-relate. Universities see themselves as having a social responsibility to respond to the larger debates of our time, and certainly our culture is debating vigorously issues of rights, freedoms, and civic responsibility as it exists at home and extends globally. This is the challenge that the writer Terry Tempest Williams’ offers us: how can we use the skills we learn in the university to better understand what positive role we want to play in the communities we identify with?

With the broad topic of civic engagement as our focus, our section of 130 asks you to use writing to inquire into the current issues of interest to our campus and local community. This work will be taking place in twenty other English 130 sections as well, and will have as their culminating work a Chico State Town Hall Meeting on University Concerns in May. Students in these sections will facilitate and participate in the discussion groups on issues you have researched and written about.

Section(s): 43

English 130 asks you to write a lot—to examine issues that you care deeply about, and to write about issues that have relevance for the time in which we live. Along with Chico State, colleges across the country are asking students to think about the health of our democracy, the goals of our nation, and how our personal, scholarly and civic identities inter-relate. Universities see themselves as having a social responsibility to respond to the larger debates of our time, and certainly our culture is debating vigorously issues of rights, freedoms, and civic responsibility as it exists at home and extends globally. This is the challenge that the writer Terry Tempest Williams’ offers us: how can we use the skills we learn in the university to better understand what positive role we want to play in the communities we identify with?

With the broad topic of civic engagement as our focus, our section of 130 asks you to use writing to inquire into the current issues of interest to our campus and local community. This work will be taking place in twenty other English 130 sections as well, and will have as their culminating work a Chico State Town Hall Meeting on University Concerns in May. Students in these sections will facilitate and participate in the discussion groups on issues you have researched and written about.

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English 203: Shakespeare on Film

English 220: Creative Writing

Section(s): 1, 2, 3, 4
Professor: Jeanne Clark

This is a beginning level creative writing course covering writing and reading in two genres: poetry and fiction. It is an exploration of writing, your own new writing as well as accomplished published examples by contemporary writers. It is also a craft workshop; in other words, it is a course in which you will labor to learn the craft of each genre. You will learn writing tools and how to use them skillfully. This course fulfills GE Area C-2 requirements.

Texts:

  • Collins, Billy, ed, Poetry 180: A Turning Back to Poetry, NY: Random House, 2003
  • Course packet, available at Chico Copy & Postal
  • Figure around $30 or so for photocopying your work for class

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Section(s): 5, 6, 7, 8
Professor: Paul Eggers

This class is designed to introduce students to the writing of serious contemporary poetry and fiction. We will study writing techniques and craft in each genre by reading each other¹s work and by studying the work of established writers. This course fulfills GE Area C-2 requirements.

Texts:

  • Course packet, available at Mr. Kopy
  • Figure around $30 or so for photocopying your work for class.

English 230: Introduction to Technical Writing

Section(s): 1
Professor: Susan Aylworth

As described in the University Catalog, this course offers you, “A study of technical writing and presentation skills in business and scientific environments, including audience analyses, writing processes, genres of technical and business discourse, visual communication, collaboration, professional responsibility, clear and correct expression” (368). Thus English 230 introduces you to the wide range of practices that make up the field called technical writing. My goals for this course are:

To help you develop rhetorical awareness of the document genres used in your field;

To give you opportunities to develop the reading, writing and research practices required to produce those document.

Most reading, research and document development will be done outside of class with communication through WebCT Vista. Class time will be a mix of large group discussions, small group and individual work on writing, research and revision, formal and informal in-class presentations and, rarely, lecture.

Texts:

  • Alred, Gerald J., Charles T. Brusaw and Walter E. Oliu (eds.), Handbook of Technical Writing, 8th Ed. Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2003
  • Williams, Robin, The Non-Designer’s Design Book, 2nd Ed. Berkeley, CA: Peachpit Press, 2004

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English 240: Introduction to Literature

English 251: African American Literature

Section(s): 1
Professor: Tracy Butts

ENGL 251 is an Area C2 general education class. It is also fulfills the ethnic requirement. A survey of the oral and written traditions of African American literature, this course will explore both early and contemporary folktales, music, slave narratives, essays, short stories, poems, novels, and dramas by African American writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Charles Chesnutt, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison, Gwendolyn Brooks, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison.

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English 252: American Indian Literature

Section(s): 1
Professor: Susan Aylworth

As described in the University Catalog, this course offers you, “A study of the oral and written literature of the American Indian and of related historical and critical materials.” Thus English 252 will introduce you to the patterns, archetypes and stories familiar to the tribal people of North America from the oral tradition through novels, poems and stories written by today’s best-known Native American writers.

My goals for this course are:

  1. To help you develop an awareness of tribal story-tellers in the context of their cultures and in the context of all human communication and story-telling;
  2. To give you tools for understanding and appreciating the literature and symbols of people from a very different cultural/ethnic background;
  3. To help you understand the “situatedness” of the stories produced by modern tribal writers.

Most reading, research and writing will be done outside of class with communication through WebCT Vista. Class time will be a mix of large group discussion, small group and individual work on reading, research, writing and revision, formal and informal in-class presentations and, rarely, lecture.

Texts: (Supplement available at Mr. Kopy)

  • Theodora Kroeber, The Inland Whale
  • John Neihardt, Black Elk Speaks
  • Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine
  • Paula Gunn Allen, Spider Woman’s Granddaughters
  • Patricia Riley, ed., Growing Up Native American

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  •  
    • Plato, Symposium (Hackett), ISBN: 0872200760
    • P. Lal, ed. Great Sanskrit Plays (New Directions), ISBN: 0811200795
    • Dante, Inferno (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), ISBN: 0374524521
    • Molière, The Misanthrope, Tartuffe, and Other Plays (Oxford), ISBN: 0192833413
    • Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (Oxford), ISBN: 0192833669
    • Tayeb Salih, A Season of Migration to the North (Heinemann), ISBN: 0435900668
    • Rita Dove, Selected Poems (Vintage), ISBN: 0679750800
    •  
      • Ann Charters, The Story and Its Writer: An Introduction to Short Fiction, compact 6th edition
      • Rust Hills, Writing in General and the Short Story in Particular
      • Figure around $40-50 for photocopying your stories for workshopping.
      • John McPhee, Pieces of the Frame, New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1979
      • Bill Roorbach, ed, Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: The Art of Truth, New York: Oxford UP, 2001
      •  
        • James Gee, What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy
        • Stephanie Harvey, Nonfiction Matters
        • Numerous online articles.
        • Packet at Chico Copy and Postal
        • A Handbook
        • An e-mail account and internet access for required readings and research
        • To think critically about literacy practices and how they impact students, teachers, communities and society.
        • To increase your awareness of the importance of reading and writing in curriculum development
        • To create a unit of reading and writing assignments for your grade/subject area.
        • To increase your skill as a writer through extensive reading and multiple revisions.
        •  
          • Alice S. Landy and William Rodney Allen, Introduction to Literature, 6th ed
          • Stephen Crane, Maggie: a girl of the Streets
          • Anderson, Laurie Halse, Speak
          • Burdett, Lois, A Midsummer Night's Dream: For Kids
          • Creech, Sharon, Love That Dog
          • Donoghue, Emma, Kissing the Witch: Old Tales in New Skins
          • Myers, Walter Dean, Monster
          • Shakespeare, William, A Midsummer Night's Dream (Forger Shakespeare Library)
          • Snicket, Lemony, The Austere Academy (Book the 5th)
          • Spinelli, Jerry, Stargirl
          • Tatar, Maria, The Classic Fairy Tales: Texts, Criticism (Norton Critical Editions)
          •  
            • The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 8th ed, package 2 (The Romantic Period through the Twentieth Century and After), ISBN: 0393928349
            • Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre (Oxford UP), ISBN: 0192839659
            •  
              • Curzan, Anne and Adams, Michael, How English Works: A Linguistic Introduction. New York: Pearson & Longman, 2006
              • Junot Diaz, Drown. New York: Riverhead, 1997
              • Jamaica Kincaid, Annie John. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1997
              • Lorrie Moore, Self-Help. New York, Vintage, 2007
              • Lex Williford and Michael Martone, eds, The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction: 50 North American Stories Since 1970. Revised & Updated 2nd Edition. New York: Touchstone, 2007
              • Black, Laurel Johnson, Between Talk and Teaching: Reconsidering the Writing Conference, Logan, Utah State UP, 1998
              • Bruce, Shanti, and Ben Rafoth, ESL Writers: A Guide for Writing Center Tutors, Portsmouth: Boynton/Cook, 2004
              • Silverman, Jay, et. al, Rules of Thumb, 7th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2006
              • A course pack of additional required readings and handouts, available at Mr. Kopy
              •  
                • The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 3, The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century
                • Henry Fielding, Joseph Andrews/Shamela, Penguin
                • Paul Hammond, ed., Restoration Literature: An Anthology, Oxford World’s Classics
                • Samuel Richardson, Pamela, Oxford World’s Classics
                • Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights
                • Anthony Trollope, The Warden
                • Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South
                • Charles Dickens, Bleak House
                • George Eliot, Middlemarch
                • Bram Stoker, Dracula
                • John Winthrop (1588-1649), “A Model of Christian Charity” (From Handout)
                • The Bay Psalm Book (1640), Psalms 81 & 137 (From Handout)
                • Anne Bradstreet (c.1612-1772), Selected Poems (online at LION)
                • Mary Rowlandson (c.1637-c.1678), The Sovereignty and Goodness of God, 1682
                • Olaudah Equiano (1745-1797), The Interesting Narrative of Olaudah Equiano, 1790
                • Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), Selected Works
                • Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), The Portable Thoreau, 1854
                • Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), Woman in the 19th Century
                • Herman Melville (1819-1891), Great Short Works of Herman Melville
                • Susan Anne Warner (1819-1895), The Wide Wide World, 1850
                • Harriet Wilson (c.1827-c.1863), Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black
                • Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), Short Stories (available online)
                • Fanny Fern (Sara Willis Parton) (1811-1872), Ruth Hall: A Domestic Novel of the Present Time, 1855
                • The Sounds and the Fury
                • As I Lay Dying
                • Light in August
                • "A Rose for Emily" (A Short Story)
                • Beloved
                • Jazz
                • Paradise
                • Love
                • Ellis, Rod, Second Language Acquisition, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000
                • Lightbown, Patsy and Nina Spada, How Languages are Learned, Third Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006
                • Maggie Tallerman, Understanding Syntax, Second edition, Hodder Arnold: A member of the Hodder Headling Group, 2005 
                • Stephen B. Kucer, Dimensions of Literacy
                • Pamela Mueller, Lifers
                • Michael Long & J. Wilhelm, Reading Don’t Fix No Chevy’s
                • Lee Gunderson, English-Only Instruction and Immigrant Students in Secondary Schools

                English 519: Chapbook Production

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Casey Huff

                Prerequisites: ENGL 415; or two 400-level courses from the Minor in Creative Writing; or ENGL 620.

                This course involves students in the process of chapbook production, from advertising, solicitation, judging and selecting manuscripts, through the stages of book production as they work with Flume Press at CSU, Chico. Students learn to perform the duties of editorial assistants at a small book publisher. The resulting chapbook is published by Flume Press. 3.0 hours discussion, 2.0 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units.

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                English 534: Literature/Language/Composition

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Judith Rodby

                This is the capstone course for the English Education major and should be taken during the student’s final year. The course work asks students to synthesize their knowledge of literature, and language and literacy development as they think, read, and write about teaching and learning in the high school English class. We will read and discuss professional literature for high school English teachers. We will work with technology as a class resource and do inquiry projects into aspects of teaching and learning.

                Course texts will be announced on VISTA.

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              • English 440: Chaucer and His Age

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Harriet Spiegel

                Chaucer and his time explores the writings of Geoffrey Chaucer. The first weeks of the course will focus on Chaucer's single largest work, the great romance of Troilus and Criseyde, complete with passion, tears, and more than one 'bedroom' scene. Readings from Boethius and other medieval writers will supplement the Chaucer readings. The rest of the course will explore selected Canterbury Tales. Students will explore the texts themselves as well as the critical reception of them over the past centuries. This course is a WP course. For this year it can, alternatively, be counted as a Periods course.

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                English 441: Shakespeare

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Lynn Elliott

                Ben Jonson, a contemporary of Shakespeare wrote: “He was not for an age but for all time.” As we study a selection of Shakespeare’s histories, comedies and tragedies (and some sonnets), we should note not only how Shakespeare influenced and was influenced by his own Elizabethan-Jacobean age, but also how later ages, particularly our own, have influenced and been influenced by his works. What, for example, happens when Shakespeare’s plays confront our age of –isms: feminism, postmodernism, new historicism, post colonialism and others? What do contemporary productions and criticisms tell us about Shakespeare? What do Shakespeare’s plays tell us about ourselves? For, as Goethe reminds us, “Shakespeare expands one's life by an eternity.” Plays: Richard II, Henry IV, I, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Taming of the Shrew, Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, ps-The Tempest.

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                English 448: The Long Eighteenth Century

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: John Traver

                This course introduces you to a broad survey of Restoration and eighteenth-century British literature and its social, political, and religious contexts. You will encounter a variety of eighteenth-century texts (e.g., novels, poems, dramas, sequential art, essays, songs, and even newspapers), all of which participate together in a broader cultural conversation. We will struggle with the question, “Just what is the long eighteenth century?” as we encounter a singing highwayman, a man disguised as a eunuch to attract women, an imagined love poem to an actual eunuch, the first English dictionary (and it’s written by just one man!), the discovery that both men and women use the bathroom, a world populated by “fish men” and “worm men,” the Spleen, fire and plague (literally), revolution, persecution, and the flowering of cat poetry.

                Assignments will include the following: a midterm and a final; two short papers and one research paper; occasional short writing assignments (pass/fail); a class presentation; memorization of one poem of your choice; class participation.

                Texts:

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                English 453: Modern Drama

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Lynn Elliott

                “There is no period so remote as the recent past,” writes playwright Alan Bennett in The History Boys. The contemporary, the age we experience first-hand, allow us little in the way of perspective. The elements of the modern (roughly pre-WWII) that determine the current age are still under discussion. Still, we know that we do experience the act of living in the contemporary first-hand. And it is the task of all artists to make certain that, to paraphrase T.S. Eliot, we do not have “the experience, but [miss] the meaning” (Four Quartets). The dramatists we will study in this class explore the dramatic relationship between (wo)men and other humans in social relationships, (wo)men and their place in the world at large, and (wo)men and their place in the larger meaningful or meaningless universe. Playwrights studied: Ibsen, Pirandello, Brecht, O’Neill, Beckett, Churchill, Hwang, Kushner.

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                English 456: The British Novel

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Teresa Traver

                This course, as the catalog says, is a study in the Victorian novel. We'll read a wide range of novels, including examples of the social problem novel, domestic realism, and the Victorian Gothic. The reading load will be heavy, but the texts will be rewarding: in this class, you’ll encounter ecclesiastical corruption, rioting among workers, spontaneous combustion, and vampire invasions, to say nothing of love which extends beyond the grave. Along the way, we’ll also take a glance at some influential criticism in the areas of Victorian studies and the novel.

                Prerequisites: ENGL 340, ENGL 356.

                Texts:

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                English 458: American Literature-Beginning to 1850s

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Matt Brown

                Texts:

                English 458 is a survey of American literature. Our method of survey is reading representative texts from several distinct literary forms and periods. We will consider their formal and thematic similarities and differences and work toward an understanding of what American Literature is; or, to put it another way, we will ask the hard question, what’s so American about American Literature?

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                English 459: American Literature-1850 to 1945

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Andrea Lerner

                If you love great American novels, this will be a feast! In English 459 we will read some of the finest American literary works while we attempt to create a cohesive collage of this sprawling period in American literature spanning the first half of the 20th century. The goal of the course is to introduce you to the several of the major writers of the period along with the issues and themes which resonate in their writing and to a large degree continue to captivate contemporary American writers. Since the literature of the period resonates with larger cultural concerns, we’ll investigate tropes including the urbanization of America, the diminishing frontier, the explosion of material wealth, the waves of immigration, the progress of science and technology and the ways in which the dominant culture shaped and was shaped by issues of gender and ethnicity. We’ll link our discussion of these issues to a careful examination of selected texts, and in the process, we will come toward a keener understanding of literary realism, naturalism and modernism in American literature.

                This seminar will invite us to relish the works of several key writers including: Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton, William Faulkner, Kate Chopin, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway among others. We will also experiment with literary theory as a way to approach these writers. We will discuss psychoanalytical criticism, Marxism, Feminism, and Reader Response theory.

                Prerequisites: English 359 (or its equivalent); English 340

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                English 461: Modern Novel

                English 462: Study in Major American Authors

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Aiping Zhang

                "William Faulkner and Toni Morrison"

                Both William Faulkner and Toni Morrison are Nobel Prize winners and the most influential novelists of their time. They share many themes, concerns and, particularly, literary devices in writing. Despite the difference in their gender, race, time, and experience, both of them have pioneered daring attempts at presenting a vision of a world, to which everyone can relate. This course is designed as an intensive and comparative study of these two authors. By reading their representative works, we will not only examine the beauty and secret of their magical narrative structure, their flowing description, and their creative use of myth and folklore, but also look into all the visions, inventions, subtleties, ambiguities, and controversies both authors have contributed to American literature.

                Required Texts:

                William Faulkner

                Toni Morrison

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                English 465: American Literary Topics

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Matt Brown

                This course covers the Genre requirement or the Elective American Literature requirement.

                Please contact instructor for class details.

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                English 467: Teaching Multicultural Literature

                English 470: Second Language Acquisition

                Section(s): 5, 6
                Professor: Frank Li

                This course is an introduction to second language acquisition theories and practices. Areas to be covered are second language acquisition theories, issues in second language acquisition, and cross-cultural awareness. We will examine a variety of theories put forward to account for the complex set of phenomena associated with learning a second language. We will look at the issues surrounding second language acquisition from various perspectives (linguistic, biological, psychological, sociological and anthropological/cultural) to gain a basic understanding of the processes involved in learning a second language and the methods used in teaching it. We will also examine issues in dealing with English language learners in schools, continually attempting to relate the theories with pedagogy in second language learning and teaching. Various general topics will form the initial focus of each class session, with the notions then connected, where possible, to specific classroom materials, techniques, and activities.

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                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Saundra Wright

                This course will introduce the basic concepts and issues related to learning and teaching a second language. We will examine issues and theories related to both first and second language learning from a variety of perspectives (e.g., linguistic, cognitive, social, and educational) in order to gain a better understanding of the processes involved in learning a second language. In addition, we will carefully examine a variety of theories put forward to account for the complex set of phenomena associated with learning a second language. By working directly with learners of second languages, we will be able to evaluate these different theories, as well as assess differences in second language learning.

                Prerequisite: English 371 (Principles of Language)

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                Section(s): 15, 17
                Professor: Peggy DuFon

                This course will introduce the basic concepts and issues related to learning and teaching a second language. We will examine issues and theories related to both first and second language learning from various perspectives including Social Theories (Language Socialization, Vygotsky’s Socio-cultural theory of language and learning) Cognitive Theories (Cummin’s theories of bilingualism), and Linguistic Theories (Chomsky’s Universal Grammar, Krashen’s Monitor Model). Within each theoretical group, we will link the theories to the acquisition and teaching of second and foreign languages. Both child and adult acquisition, and naturalistic and classroom learning contexts will be explored. The information provided in this course will help you make better decisions based on knowledge gained from current research regarding the second language learners in your classrooms. Teaching approaches as well as teaching the various language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, grammar) will also be covered.

                English 471: Intensive Theory & Practice, Second Language Acquisition

                English 473: Historical Linguistics

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Graham Thurgood

                Prerequisites: ENGL 371 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor.

                Evaluation and interpretation of similarities among languages. Methods of investigating and recon­structing the past history of languages (including those for which no significant earlier written record exists). Examining and evaluating the linguistic evidence for its insights into the earlier culture, migration patterns, and linguistic contacts of the speakers.

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                English 474: Syntactic/Morpho Analysis

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Graham Thurgood

                Prerequisites: ENGL 371. Study of syntax, focusing on similarities and differences among languages from both formal and functional viewpoints.

                “Such…are the effects of visionary schemes: when we first form them we know them to be absurd, but familiarize them by degrees, and in time lose sight of their folly.” —Imlac, in Johnson’s Rasselas

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                English 478: Linguistics Approaches to Reading

                Section(s): 1
                Professor: Judith Rodby 

                In this course we will consider the question—What is reading and what roles do language, culture, social interaction, cognition, and schooling play in reading and learning to read? In other words, we will read research and studies of teaching and learning and curricula done from a variety of (overlapping) theoretical frameworks: linguistic, educational, sociocultural, developmental and cognitive; and we will consider which perspectives dominate in the reading field and why. We will consider both adolescents who struggle with reading and the development of reading and literacy in ELLs. We will each work with a reading partner two hours a week, keep a log of sessions, and develop a case study presentation. 

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            • English 358: Survey of American Literature

              Section(s): 1
              Professor: Lynn Houston

              This course surveys American literature from its origins in the travel accounts of European explorers, during their exploration and settlement of the Americas, to the significant changes in modes of literary and cultural representation prompted by the American Civil War. We cover an extraordinarily wide range of material, so reading selections tend to be long and we tend to move at a rapid pace. The purpose of reading excerpts from longer selections and of taking a faster pace is to allow us to cover as many different authors as possible in order to give you the most comprehensive view of the history of American literature. Out of this view, you should develop a sense of the importance of the various contexts (social, cultural, history of ideas, literary movements and periods, etc.) out of which early American literature is produced. More importantly, the chronological approach to the course material should foster in you a desire to reflect on the connection between our lives now and the themes, dilemmas, and ways of living presented in the literary texts. The most important learning objective in this course is for you to develop critical skills by which to closely read and interpret shorter passages from literary selections that you are able to put into dialogue with a larger historical and cultural context of literary production.

              This course uses The Heath Anthology of American Literature, vols. A and B. Specific reading assignments will be made clear on the first day of class, but in general, some of the main authors we will cover are as follows: Columbus, Cabeza de Vaca, Smith, Morton, Bradford, Bradstreet, Rowlandson, Mather, Franklin, Paine, Adams, Jefferson, Wheatley, Equiano, Douglass, Emerson, Thoreau, Lincoln, Irving, Hawthorne, Poe, Cooper, Melville, Truth, Fern, Stanton, Whitman, and Dickinson.

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              English 359: Survey of American Literature

              Section(s): 1
              Professor: Aiping Zhang

              This course is a survey of American literature between the end of the Civil War and the start of the Jazz Age. We will start the course with an overview of the historical and cultural context in which American literature transformed itself through a series of major literary experiments. By reading representative literary works in various genres, we will study a very diverse group of authors who made key contributions to the development of the “Local Color” Writing, American Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and African American literature during this period. Group presentations/activities will be organized to encourage the students' participation in discussion. Readings will be selected from The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Vols. C and D, 6th Edition.

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              English 360: Women Writers

              Section(s): 1
              Professor: Lynn Houston

              The material for this semester’s course focuses largely on late twentieth-century British and American novels known as “chick lit.” In this class, students will identify the major defining characteristics of the genre of contemporary fiction called “chick lit” (a novel in which thirty-something career women deal humorously with the ups and downs of their romantic relationships). Students should also gain a sense of the origin/history of this genre as it arises out of the “marriage plot” of eighteenth century British novels written by women, as well as a sense of the relationship that chick lit has to the history of feminism. Our debates surrounding the nature and features of "chick lit" will be the organizing elements of this course. We will draw in other materials that will also help students to gain a larger sense of the history of women's writing and of feminist literary criticism and theory. Some possible readings include: Pride and PrejudiceBridget Jones’s DiaryGood in BedConfessions of a ShopaholicSex and the City (yes, it was originally a book!), etc., as well as works of “ethnic chick lit” by authors such as Kim Wong Keltner and Alisa Valdes-Rodriquez.

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              Section(s): 2
              Professor: Danielle Alexich

              ENGL/WMST 360 will expose students to a range of literary works in which women writers express a complex relationship to culture and society. We will discuss historical and current practices, examine institutions and belief systems that impact women’s lives, and identify ways women writers confront social, economic, political and personal issues.

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              English 371: Principles of Language

              Section(s): 2,3
              Professor: Frank Li

              This course will introduce students to the general nature and structure of human language. It covers the core areas of linguistics (a) phonetics: the production, description, classification and transcription of speech sounds; (b) phonology: the description of the systematic patterning of sounds in human language; (c) morphology: the study of the internal structure of words; (d) syntax: the study of sentence structure; and (e) semantics: the study of linguistic meaning. In addition, this course addresses other important areas of linguistics, includingpragmaticspsycholinguisticssociolinguistics, and historical linguistics.

              Pragmatics is concerned with how people use language within a context and why they use language in particular ways. Psycholinguistics is the discipline that tests assumptions about the processing and the learning of language. It attempts to answer questions about how language is represented and processed in the brain and what areas of the brain are used for language functions and processes. Socio-linguistics deals with the relationship between language and society. The knowledge the students gain in this part of the course will help them to fully comprehend variation in language use; that is, students will address issues in inter-speaker and intra-speaker variation. historical linguistics looks at language change through time (diachronic change) and language change at any given point in time (synchronic change/variation). It also addresses language relationships, both genetic and areal.

              This course fulfills the GE breadth requirement for area C2.

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              Section(s): 1
              Professor: Saundra Wright

              The objective of this course is to introduce students to the study of linguistics, primarily through an inductive exploration of the rule-governed systems in language. This will allow students to explore the fundamental processes associated with first language acquisition and literacy and provide students with the analytic tools necessary to investigate areas such as second language acquisition, language policy, and linguistics as a science. Much of this course will focus on traditional types of linguistic analyses and theories concerning how humans process language in areas such as phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. In addition, we will look at issues in language acquisition, psycholinguistics, and sociolinguistics.

              Texts:

              Section(s): 70, 72
              Professor: Graham Thurgood

              An introduction to linguistics. Topics include language acquisition, language structure, language variation, and languages of the world. Note: This course is designed, among other things, to prepare students for ENGL 470 Second Language Acquisition and other such classes requiring a background in language structure.

              Packet of materials: Available online.

              This course fulfills the GE breadth requirement for area C2. Students will therefore gain knowledge and understanding of language as it is associated with diverse cultures, language acquisition, and language as an interpretive and communicative vehicle. Students will learn effective communication of linguistic analyses. As specified in area C2 students will attend 4 public events and connect these with the course material. Fifteen hundred words of writing are required for this course; this will be fulfilled through the assigned exercises and research assignments.

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              English 375: Introduction to English Grammar

              Section(s): 3
              Professor: Graham Thurgood

              English 375 is a course in descriptive English grammar and syntax designed for English majors planning to be secondary teachers of English. Our focus is on analyzing how English works and how this knowledge can be applied to analyzing texts and to teaching.

              English 419: Chapbook Production

              Section(s): 1
              Professor: Casey Huff

              Prerequisites: ENGL 415 or two 400-level courses from the Minor in Creative Writing, or ENGL 620, or ENGL 622, or instructor permission.

              This course involves students in the process of chapbook production, from advertising, solicitation, judging and selecting manuscripts, through the stages of book production as they work with Flume Press at CSU, Chico. Students learn to perform the duties of editorial assistants at a small book publisher. The resulting chapbook is published by Flume Press. 3.0 hours discussion, 2.0 hours activity. You may take this course more than once for a maximum of 8.0 units.

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              English 420: Advanced Poetry Writing

              Section(s): 1, 2
              Professor: Jeanne Clark

              In this course, you will write new drafts of poems almost weekly, poems of your own wild imaginings. You will read five brand-new, hot-off-the-press collections by both established and up-and-coming poets, representing a wide constellation of voices, approaches, and subjects. You will write, revise, and read a lot.

              Together we will consider in depth the following craft issues: voice & tone, structure & form, titles, deep revision, and preparing manuscripts for publication. In collaboration with the advanced literary editing students, you will draft and produce individual poetry chapbooks of your work.

              The reading list will include the following full-length collections: Oliver de la Paz, Furious Lullaby; Max Garland, Hunger Wide as Heaven; Carole Simmons Oles, Waking Stone: Inventions on the Life of Harriet Hosmer; Richard Siken, Crush; Molly Tennenbaum, Now. These texts are all required.

              Poets Molly Tennenbaum and Carole Oles will be visiting our class.

              Prerequisite: English 320 (or the demonstrated equivalent from another institution) or instructor permission. Graduate students may take this course for credit.

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              English 421: Advanced Fiction Writing

              Section(s): 1, 2
              Professor: Rob Davidson

              English 421 is an intensive workshop-based course in the writing of fiction. You will be asked to write “literary” work in this class (i.e., serious, ambitious, well-crafted, contemporary, adult-oriented, emotionally engaging, and so forth). Work that does not aspire to the literary is outside the domain of this class. This includes literature for children, the sentimental romance, formulaic mystery writing, and the like. We shall study writing techniques and craft by reading each other’s work and by studying the work of established authors. Expect to do a lot of writing and revision.

              All forms of fiction (i.e., the short story, the “long story,” the novella, and the novel) are welcome in this class. Specifically, we shall study fiction techniques and craft by reading each other’s work and by studying the work of established authors. Expect to do a lot of writing and revision.

              Prerequisite: English 321 (or the demonstrated equivalent from another institution) or instructor permission.

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              English 431: Theory/Practice in Tutoring Composition

              Section(s): 1
              Professor: Mark Hall

              English 431: Theory & Practice of Tutoring Writing trains students to become peer writing tutors in the University Writing Center. This course includes a weekly seminar in which we discuss reading assignments, hear student presentations, and undertake problem-solving sessions on teaching dilemmas encountered in the Writing Center.

              One unit of this 4-unit course is a practicum, which requires 3-4 regularly scheduled hours as a Writing Assistant. To fulfill the requirements of the practicum, you will be assigned Writing Center hours that fit your schedule. You will begin working as a Writing Assistant during the third week of the semester. The practicum includes the following: observations of a Mentor-led tutoring session and an English 30 Writing Workshop, weekly conversations with Mentor Writing Assistants; facilitation of student writing in the Writing Center.

              Paid positions in the Writing Center and in the English 30 Writing Workshop Program require successful completion of this course with a “B” or better. English 431 provides an introduction to theories and practices of writing instruction and is a recommended prerequisite for English 634: Teaching Academic Writing, the graduate course for teachers of English 130: Academic Writing.

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          • English 342: Literature of the Child

            Section(s): 1
            Professor: Peter Kittle

            "Literature of the Child" focuses on both literature written for children and literature written about children. We will read a wide variety of children's literature, from picture books through young adult novels, exploring such subgenres as fantasy, historical fiction, science fiction, and contemporary realistic fiction. We will also read contemporary adult literature featuring prominent child protagonists, and will examine other mediated representations of children and childhood (e.g. films, television, consumer culture, etc.). Theoretical readings from scholars such as Jack Zipes and Peter Hunt will provide critical lenses through which we will examine and evaluate the literary texts we read. Students in the class, who will be partnered with local elementary school students, will compose an original children's book for their partner student.

            Approximately 15 books will be read during class; likely fiction selections include such classics as Alice in Wonderland, The Wizard of Oz, The Hobbit, and The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe; contemporary offerings like The Golden Compass, Harry Potter, Stargirl, A Single Shard, Smack; adult novels including Paddy Clark Ha Ha Ha, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, The Kite Runner.

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            English 353: Multicultural Literature

            Section(s): 1
            Professor: Rob Burton

            English 353 is a Jumbo-sized class (150 students) which uses various technology media (such as Blogs and Powerpoints) as a way of encouraging students to discuss and write about contemporary Multicultural Literature. It is a GE Upper Division Theme C course.

            Students will read 4 internationally-known authors: Kazuo Ishiguro, Bessie Head, Salman Rushdie, and Bharati Mukherjee.

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            English 354: Classical Literature

            English 355: Bible as Literature

            English 356: Survey of British Literature

            English 357: Survey of British Literature

            Section(s): 1
            Professor: Geoff Baker

            The goal of this course is to give you a solid grounding in the major works and figures of British and Irish literature from Romanticism in the late-eighteenth century to postmodernism and the present day. For those hoping to go on to careers as teachers of literature or language, this is a chance to grasp larger movements and issues over time—valuable context for the period in which you are specializing or for your overall knowledge of the British literary canon. For those heading into other professional spheres, this is a chance to hit one classic after another.

            Assignments will include 2 midterms and a final exam; quizzes; 2 short papers; and regular participation in class discussions and online class bulletin boards.

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        • English 335: Rhetoric and Writing

          Section(s): 1
          Professor: Chris Fosen

          This is a course in the rhetoric of social movements. But what are social movements? The history of this country—and perhaps of all countries—has been characterized by periodic bursts of activity in which organized groups of citizens sought to make changes in society. Some authors we’ll read this semester argue that the American Revolution started as a social movement, and since then social movements have done a good deal of work to change society and social policy in positive ways: they’ve helped to abolish slavery and child labor; establish eight hour workdays and 40 hour weeks; desegregate public facilities and schools; fought for (and then against) prohibition; and so on. Each movement is made up of organized groups who work to influence public opinion through various forms of rhetoric.

          If you’re like most people, you’ll come to this course with a fairly fuzzy idea of what rhetoric is. For our purposes here, rhetoric is the study of how texts operate in social spheres to persuade, influence, or move audiences. As we will see, it is a complex discipline with a long and contested history, and it is a method not just for producing texts but for analyzing them. In this class we’ll learn about rhetoric as a field of study, practice it in our written assignments, and use rhetorical methods to analyze the texts of social movements. Your job will be to become an expert on one social movement you find interesting and worthy of sustained research. The papers you write will introduce you to rhetorical methods and help you learn about the ways social movements achieve practical goals through the strategic use of discourse. Because the texts we’ll read are challenging, I expect you to have read them more than once, and to come to class either with an understanding of what you’ve read or a list of questions to start conversation. People who do well in the course will stay on top of the material, and will look for ways to relate conversations and debates in this course to issues outside it.

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          English 340: Approaches to Literary Genres

          Section(s): 1
          Professor: Matt Brown

          Texts:

          This course will expose you to four major genres of literature (poetry, short fiction, the novel, drama); in the process, it will sharpen your understanding of each genre’s conventions and the deviations from those conventions that define each individual writer’s style. Ultimately, the goal of this course is to help you expand your ability to read think and write critically, using literature as the ground upon which those skills are tested.

          Section(s): 2
          Professor: John Traver

          This course introduces you to several literary genres (fiction, poetry, and drama) and provides you with a set of analytical skills and strategies for interpreting literary texts. You will learn to recognize common genre conventions, as well as how skilled authors may work within (or even defy) these conventions in ways which surprise us. You will also become familiar with common literary terminology and learn how to construct an effective literary argument.

          Note: because this course provides important preparation for the English major, it will be writing intensive. Assignments will include the following: two midterms and a final; three papers (one on each genre, with multiple drafts); shorter writing assignments (such as postings on vista); quizzes; memorization of one poem of your choice; class participation.

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          English 341: Reading Literature for Future Teachers

          Section(s): 1, 40
          Professor: Kim Jaxon

          This course is required of all Liberal Studies majors. As the title of the course, "Reading Literature," suggests, students will read an array of literary genres, including short stories, novels, poetry, and drama. Students will also read some pieces of literary criticism and articles by teacher-researchers about reading pedagogy. By the conclusion of the term, students will be able to read a wide array of literary texts, both those written for adult readers and those written for younger readers; students will be able to identify literary devices and consider their effects; students will be able to select literature for children to read and develop teaching plans to help students read literary texts with understanding and pleasure. Students will demonstrate their learning through successful presentations/performances, group projects, and written/visual assignments.

          This course addresses the literary study areas specified by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing as requirements for multiple-subject teachers: literary concepts and conventions; literary genres; interpretation of literary texts.

          Texts:

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      • English 333: Advanced Composition for Future Teachers

        Section(s): 72
        Professor: Peter Kittle

        This course is designed to meet the needs of future teachers of writing at all grade levels. We will have three primary goals. First, we will read and write extensively, for a variety of purposes and audiences, and in a number of genres. Second, we will conduct an inquiry into the teaching of writing, determining best practices based on current articles in leading journals on teaching writing. Third, we will actively explore emergent forms of composition, particularly digital forms of communication like weblogs, wikis, podcasts, and digital storytelling.

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        Section(s): 4
        Professor: Mary Ann Latimer

        Texts:

        English 333 is an upper division composition course for students pursuing a teaching credential. The subject matter is literacy; we will be reading, analyzing, discussing and writing about teaching reading and writing. It is your WP class, thus an intensive reading and writing class designed to offer advanced practice in writing as well as a review of grammatical rules.

        Objectives:

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    • English 264: American Ethnic/Regional Writers

      Section(s): 1
      Professor: Matt Brown

      Our class is a study of American ethnic and regional writers; it charts the rise of regional writing as a national phenomenon following the Civil War, reaching its heyday early in the twentieth-century, and it explores its continuing appeal. By examining the literature of particular regions of the United States, we hope to form answers to the central question of the class: what is the claim these writers are making about their region in relation to the rest of the nation? While pursuing this question, we will consider that regional writers often face both ethnic and regional stereotypes in the reception of their literature and, thus, they often see in their own work a mandate to represent their regional and/or ethnic groups to the larger culture.

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      English 315: Intro to Literary Editing/Publishing

      Section(s): 1
      Professor: Beth Spencer

      History of publishing in America, acquisition of basic editorial skills, and study of the editing and publishing processes, with a focus on book publishing. Class works on producing group-designed anthologies, and publishes authors' chapbooks. 3.0 hours discussion, 2.0 hours activity.

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      English 321: Fiction Writing

      Section(s): 1
      Professor: Paul Eggers

      This class is intended to enhance your ability to write and to understand serious literary fiction, at an intermediate level. It is designed only for students who have successfully completed English 220 (formerly English 20), the required prerequisite for this course.

      Texts:

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      English 327: Creative Nonfiction

      Section(s): 1, 2

      Professor: Rob Davidson

      English 327 is an intensive workshop-based course in the writing of the literary non-fiction essay. You will be asked to write “literary” work in this class (i.e., serious, ambitious, well-crafted, contemporary, adult-oriented, emotionally engaging, and so forth). Work that does not aspire to the literary is outside the domain of this class. We shall study writing techniques and craft by reading each other’s work and by studying the work of established authors. Expect to do a lot of writing and revision.

      Please note that this course is specifically designed with the short essay in mind. As a general rule, a short essay is a self-contained prose narrative that does not exceed 6,000 words (24 double-spaced pages). Longer essays, including chapters from longer works that cannot be read as “stand alone” essays, are outside the domain of this class.

      Prerequisite: English 220 (Beginning Creative Writing) or instructor permission.

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  • English 253: Asian American Literature

    Section(s): 1
    Professor: Peggy DuFon

    This course is an introduction to Asian American literature. We will read novels, memoirs, short stories, and poems by Asian American authors who have emigrated or whose ancestors have emigrated from different regions of Asia at different time periods in American history. We will compare issues and themes that appear within and across texts. We will also focus on the development of different reading strategies in order to better understand literary texts. Daily journals will help students to stay on track with the readings, to explore their interaction with the text and with their approach to reading the text. In order to deepen their knowledge of a particular author, ethnicity, theme, etc., each student will be required to write a library research paper. Students must attend four Asia related cultural events and relate them to the material discussed in class. Grading will be based on class participation, the daily journals, research paper, cultural event reports and a final exam.

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    English 254: Chicano/Latino/a Literature

    English 258: World Literature

    English 260: Great Books

    Section(s): 1
    Professor: Geoff Baker

    The goal of this course is to introduce you to novels, poetry, and drama selected from the world’s great literature, a body of work that stretches back thousands of years. On your own, you will be expected to read each text carefully. As a class, we will attempt to place each work in its larger context and see what it seems to want to say to its reader and what tools it uses to say it. Ultimately, a literature class is always about learning to read and write carefully and critically. While it’s always fun to read great books, this course is also an opportunity to hone skills vital to whichever field we choose professionally.

    Assignments will include a midterm and a final exam; 2 short papers; quizzes; and participation in class and on class bulletin boards on Vista.

    In addition to very brief excerpted portions of Dante’s La Vita Nuova, Plato’s Republic and the Mu’allaqat of Imru’ al-Qais, there are the following required texts:

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