Juni Banerjee-Stevens—Spreading Hope

“I’m always amazed by how much students gain simply from bonding with their peers over their mutual struggles.”

Devjani (Juni) Banerjee-Stevens is the project manager for a $250,000 grant from California Mental Health Services Administration to develop and bolster mentorship and outreach programs on campus that prevent suicide. “Mental health outreach is one of my passions, and it’s one of the reasons I have always worked in a college counseling center,” says the Counseling Center staff member.

Students are a key part of that effort, she adds. “Mental health outreach is one of my passions, and it’s one of the reasons I have always worked in a college counseling center. I’ve done numerous presentations to students on how to reduce stress and manage anxiety or perfectionism.

“Getting the information out there is great, but I’m always amazed by how much students gain simply from bonding with their peers over their mutual struggles. Facilitating these conversations is what I love most about my job.”

Banerjee-Stevens believes that a large part of her role is to help students overcome the obstacles that hinder their academic success. “I am also committed to promoting social justice through the practice of psychology,” she says.

This stance on social justice through psychology has guided Banerjee-Stevens’ work with students from underrepresented populations, including first-generation, LGBTQ, and international students, as well as students who straddle more than one culture.

Banerjee-Stevens received her bachelor’s degree in music and English from Stanford University in 1992 and her master’s and PhD in counseling and student personnel psychology from the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities. She has worked in the counseling centers of several small liberal arts colleges as well as large, urban campuses. She joined the Counseling and Wellness Center in March 2012. 

Portrait of Juni Banerjee-Stevens