Economist, Former Director of United Nations’ Children’s Fund To Deliver Public Lectures

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: 04-02-2007

Kathleen McPartland
Public Affairs
530-898-4260
Michael Perelman
Economics
530-898-5321

Paul Altesman, former director of the United Nations’ Children’s Fund and organizer of various international humanitarian assistance projects on behalf of the UN secretary general, will visit Chico on April 17 and 18 to present public lectures.

On Tuesday, April 17, Altesman will speak on "The Political Economy of International Relations" at 7 p.m. in Tehama 106. On Wednesday, April 18, he will speak on "The Development of Economic Underdevelopment" at 7 p.m. in Holt 170. Both lectures are free.

As director of the UN’s Children’s Fund, Altesman had many responsibilities, including participation in the coordination of all UN economic, social and emergency policies and programs. He attended meetings of the UN Security Council, the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council. Responsibilities also required participation in most UN-related economic or social world summit meetings during the 1980s and 1990s.

Specifically, Altesman helped organize humanitarian assistance to the Iraqi people after the first Gulf War, negotiations for the Paris Peace Accords for Cambodia, the first UN missions to the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union and preparations for post-Oslo Peace Accords on the Middle East.

From 1980 to 1982, Altesman was a program officer with UNICEF, responsible for planning and coordinating international relief for the Cambodian famine in the immediate aftermath of the Pol Pot era, a $1 billion program. This program was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Altesman received his PhD from the Universite de Paris at the Sorbonne. His areas of expertise include macroeconomics and microeconomics, international economics, money and banking, labor economics, and development economics.

Altesman is the author of more than 75 UN publications about economic and social development, humanitarian relief and peace building, with a focus on development assistance, macroeconomic adjustment processes and their impact on the poor, the impact of development policies on children, World Bank and IMF aid programs and assessments of the effectiveness of the United Nations.

Altesman’s visit is sponsored by the Associated Students, the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, the Department of Economics and the Office of the Provost.

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