CSU, Chico Rural SimCenter to Support Helicopter Simulation at Chico Municipal Airport on Friday

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: 03-09-2017

Sean Murphy
TEL: 530-898-6492
Becky Damazo
School of Nursing
TEL: 530-591-5812

California State University, Chico’s Rural Northern California Clinical Simulation Center team will be on scene to manage and assist Enloe Medical Center FlightCare members Friday at the Chico Municipal Airport as they use advanced lifelike mannequins to train for critical event rescue. The event will take place at the base of the flight control tower, starting at about 1 p.m. 

Multiple simulations will provide several teams with opportunities to fine-tune processes, skills and systems to improve care for live patients. The training is not open to the public. Media who wish to attend the simulation exercise are asked to call Becky Damazo, professor of nursing at CSU, Chico and director of the Rural SimCenter at 530-591-5812.

The Rural SimCenter works with Enloe flight educators to design the case scenarios and implement this sophisticated and important training. The Enloe flight crew teams are dedicated to improving the care they provide to the community and practice regularly using simulation technology.

“We do these training exercises so that we’re prepared when we encounter complex issues that are high risk but rarely seen,” said Damazo. “It’s part of a plan for patient safety.”

The helicopter simulation allows the teams to train in their standard environment. Because the Rural SimCenter can provide sophisticated wireless mannequins and simulation expertise, this training can be taken to the actual work environment of participants—in this case, a helicopter. CSU, Chico nursing students will participate as actors to provide realism in the scenario and learn directly from Enloe flight nurses as they participate in the training.

The Rural SimCenter is an internationally accredited simulation center that provides state-of-the-art technology and instruction for CSU, Chico nursing students, health care teams and professionals, employing the use of high-tech mannequins that mimic human patients. These mannequins range in age from newborn to older adults, and imitate human characteristics, such as a heartbeat, blinking, breathing, bleeding and child labor.

“This type of training is very expensive and most rural areas are unable to provide the level of training we offer at the Rural SimCenter,” said Damazo, noting the Rural SimCenter has been a learning center for 11 years. “We’re able to offer world-class training due to the progressive partnership between CSU, Chico, Enloe Medical Center, Feather River Hospital and Oroville Hospital.”

The SimCenter’s mission is to “increase patient safety through improved clinical proficiency and teamwork,” and the helicopter simulation is one more way professionals practice rapid mobilization and immediate response in a high-risk area.

“Deliberate practice and integration of teamwork skills in the time-pressured clinical environment is an excellent way to identify latent threats and system issues that can compromise patient safety,” Damazo said.

More information on the Rural SimCenter can be found at its website: www.ruralsimcenter.org