Seth Klobodu, Ph.D.

 Assistant Professor in the Department of Nutrition & Food Sciences 

Dr. Klobodu’s research embrace the fields of nutrition, statistics, and economics. The core of his current research examines the relationships among economic growth, maternal and child health/ nutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The primary objective of this study is to explore the impact of maternal and child health/nutrition on economic development in SSA. The second goal tests for the existence of bi-directional relationships between maternal and child health/nutrition, and economic development in this region. He is also interested in understanding the impact of economic disparities on health and nutrition at the household level, and economic evaluation of nutrition projects. His research interests are motivated from the numerous nutrition assessments he conducted in economically deprived areas where he observed a common phenomenon; high prevalence of malnutrition and ill health among a significant number of women and children. Dr. Klobodu believes focusing on these areas can be one of the most effective ways of highlighting the importance of maternal and child health or nutrition, leading to further investment and subsequent slowing down of the intergenerational cycle of ill-health, malnutrition and poverty in deprived communities. 

Dr. Klobodu’s previous studies have looked at anemia prevalence among schoolchildren, the effects of lysine supplementation on the health of children and adults in peri-urban areas of Accra, Ghana. He has also looked at the association between alcoholic beverage consumption, nutritional status, physical activity levels, biochemical and clinical characteristics of alcoholics in peri-urban communities of the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. He was also involved in the analyses of iodine content of salt samples in Ghana for the United Nations Children's Emergency Fund national Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS 4).