A publication for the faculty, staff, administrators, and friends of California State University, Chico
September 18, 2008 Volume 39 / Number 1

 

 

New Faculty 2008

New Faculty 2008

View larger image

Back row: Paul Zingg, Elise Archias, Joseph Hwang, Paul Viotti, Casey Donaho, Young Cheon Cho, Elizabeth Boyd, Lisa Ott, Kevin Patton, Bill Campbell, Simon Mittman, and Stephen Treanor.

Front row: Jason Clower, Robert Jones, Anna Petrova-Mayor, Nan Li, Jessica Clark, Michael Rehg, Natalya Shkoda, Hope Smith, Colette Calmelet, Jodi Shepherd, Cristina Archer, ChengTu Hsieh, Fulvio Orsitto, Mollie Aschenbrener, Kathleen Gabriel, Richard Gitelson, Claudia Peralta Nash, Shelley Vonberg, Teresa Traver, Joel Mintzes, Julie Freelove, Kathy Cox, Tom Ontiveros, Maris Thompson, Gail Walton and Sandra Flake.

Not pictured: Elise Cole, David Keller, Ruben Sargsyan and Al Schademan


New Faculty Biographies

Cristina Archer

College of Natural Sciences, Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences

Cristina received her MS in civil and environmental engineering in 1995 from the Politecnico di Milano in Milan, Italy, and a second MS in meteorology from San Jose State University in 1998. She then started her PhD in civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University, where her thesis work focused on the Santa Cruz Eddy, a vortex that forms over the Monterey Bay, as well as on wind power resource assessment for the U.S. and the world. After completing her PhD in 2004, Cristina worked for a couple of years at the Bay Area Air Quality Management District in San Francisco, a state agency that manages air pollution issues from stationary sources in the Bay Area. She then joined the Department of Global Ecology of the Carnegie Institution for Science at Stanford in 2007, where she worked on global climate change effects on the jet streams and on high-altitude wind power. Cristina finally joined the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences at CSU, Chico as an assistant professor, while keeping an appointment at Stanford University as a consulting assistant professor with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Her research will focus on renewable energy, especially wind power; numerical modeling of both atmospheric phenomena and air pollution; and global climate change.

Back to Top

S. Elise Archias

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of Art and Art History

Elise received her PhD in art history from UC Berkeley in July 2008. Her dissertation, The Body as a Material in the Early Performance Work of Carolee Schneemann, Yvonne Rainer, and Vito Acconci, centers on the role performance played in the art that emphasized "everydayness" in the1960s and early 1970s. In the work of these three artists, the body was shown to be an "everyday object" simultaneously mundane and strange, at times responding involuntarily to its surrounding conditions and, at others, utterly blank. She argues that the body allowed New York art practice to register the human stakes of consumer culture's desensitizing effects on late 20th-century life. Elise's future work will expand this project to take up the legacy of late 1960s art practice in contemporary exhibitions; the changes 1970s feminism and post-Civil Rights Movement discourses on race brought to broader cultural understandings of the body; and the art and politics of the 1960s in locations beyond the U.S. and Europe. Elise will be teaching modern, contemporary, and survey art history courses at CSU, Chico, and her teaching reflects her commitment to close looking.

Back to Top

Elizabeth "Betsy" A. Boyd

College of Agriculture, Plant Science

I received both my BS and MS in entomology (the study of insects) from Washington State University, specializing in integrated pest management and biological control of weeds, respectively. Several years later, I received my PhD in entomology from the University of California, Riverside, majoring in biological control of arthropods and minoring in integrated pest management and insect behavior. My future goals include, but are not limited to, 1) fostering the intellectual development of the CSU, Chico College of Agriculture students into extraordinary agricultural and environmental stewards; after all, they are an essential component to the future of food production that is vital to our survival, and we are depending upon them, and 2) shaping the landscape of agriculture with viable and sustainable pest management practices through applied research and outreach activities. When I am graced with free time, I fill it gardening, fishing, snowboarding, gold panning, or feeding my pet preying mantids in the kitchen windowsill.

Back to Top

William J. Campbell

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of History

Dr. Campbell completed his graduate studies at McMaster University in Canada in 2007. After completing his PhD, he spent a year teaching at McGill University in Montréal before joining the Department of History at CSU, Chico. Dr. Campbell's research has primarily examined the interaction between indigenous and European peoples during the 18th century in the northeastern borderlands of colonial North America.

Back to Top

Jessica H. Clark

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of History

I received my MA and PhD in classics from Princeton University, where I also received a Certificate in the interdisciplinary Program in the Ancient World. My own research involves the history of the Roman Republic, and in particular its systems and styles of commemoration (for example, its war memorials). I enjoy teaching all aspects of Classical civilization, especially when I'm able to introduce students to the wealth of literary and archaeological evidence that has (miraculously) survived the past two or three thousand years. Our modern world receives so many of its traditions and its structures from the Greek and Roman past, but it has become such a vastly different civilization—exploring, debating, and enjoying these similarities and differences make for some of my favorite conversations. When I'm not immersed in all things Classical, I like hiking, watching baseball, and taking photographs with old-fashioned cameras.

Back to Top

Jason Clower

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of Religious Studies

I specialize in Chinese Buddhism and Confucianism, particularly in modern times, and just finished my PhD at Harvard. When I first began, I did mostly historical research on monks with guns. In time, however, I moved to gentler matters such as the tricky relationship between Buddhists and Confucians in modern times. I am currently writing a book called The Unlikely Buddhologist, about a 20th Confucian philosopher who both shuns Buddhism and yet expressly models his own philosophy on Buddhist metaphysics. In my spare time, I compete in the colorfully bizarre Eastern European sport of kettlebell lifting.

Back to Top

Elise Cole

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Department of Psychology

I grew up in Kenya, East Africa. I received a BA in psychology from the University of South Florida and a MA in marriage and family therapy from George Fox University. I completed a PhD in marriage and family therapy from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 2008. I spent the last year working at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in medical family therapy. My research has been focused on the measurement of therapist multicultural competency from the clients' perspective.

Back to Top

Kathy Cox

College of Behavioral Science, School of Social Work

I received my MSW from San Diego State in 1979 and my PhD in social work from the University of Southern California in 2005. I have spent many years working in the children's mental health field as a clinician, clinical supervisor, and program director. Areas of specialty have included serving youth in the juvenile justice system using a multisystemic focus and providing therapy to children who have been traumatized as a result of abuse or exposure to domestic violence. My research has focused on strength-based assessment and intervention with children, youth, and families. I have three grown children of my own, all currently living in California. My favorite hobby is yoga—I have been practicing for about 10 years.

Back to Top

Julie Freelove-Charton

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Department of Health and Community Services

Julie earned her doctorate in health promotion, education, and behavior from the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. Her research interests include healthy aging behaviors, the prevention and self-management of chronic conditions across the lifespan, health disparities, and end-of-life care. A primary focus of her work is to increase interdisciplinary programming for healthy aging and to assist the building of sustainable relationships among individuals, community-based organizations, and academia.

Through Julie's research interests, she has worked in numerous community settings including senior and community centers, junior high and elementary schools, and faith-based organizations including AME Churches in South Carolina and Jewish Community Centers in California. She has also been invited to speak at national academic and state level conferences including the annual and Pacific Southwest Recreation and Training Conference for the California Park and Recreation Society.

Prior to returning to the university for her PhD, she was the account manger of the SilverSneakers Fitness Program, a Medicare health benefit for Blue Shield of California's HMO members residing in Southern California, a market analyst for FieldCentrix, and market researcher for Primus Corporation. She also competed in the 2006 U.S. Olympic Trials for Road Cycling and holds a MS degree in kinesiology and a BS in psychology.

Back to Top

Young Cheon Cho

College of Communication and Education, Department of Communication Arts and Sciences

Having been initially trained at Yonsei University in South Korea, I received an MA in communication at University of Colorado at Boulder. For the last six years, I was at the University of Iowa studying for my PhD in communication studies. My intellectual projects have been focused on the history of rhetoric and theories of the public. More specifically, I am interested in the notion of phronesis (practical wisdom), media events, political spectacles, global resistance, and the body rhetoric of subalterns. I also enjoy listening to jazz, watching movies, and cooking.

Back to Top

Richard Gitelson

College of Communication and Education, Department of Recreation and Parks Management

I am both a Tarheel (University of North Carolina) and an Aggie (Texas A&M). My dissertation was on role conflict and role ambiguity in the National Park Service. Before CSU, I taught at UNC, Penn State, and Arizona State. Along the way, my interests have ranged from recreation behavior, motivations and benefits to the economic and social impacts of heritage and other forms of tourism. After receiving a graduate certificate in gerontology at ASU, my research has focused on healthy aging, sports behavior among older adults, benefits of senior centers, and the impact of moving to retirement communities on recreation and exercise behavior, social networks, and overall health.

Back to Top

ChengTu Hsieh

College of Communication and Education, Department of Kinesiology

He received his PhD from the University of Northern Colorado in sport and exercise science with an emphasis in biomechanics. His research focus is the analysis of sport performance, especially volleyball. Currently, he has been working on the analysis of the volleyball spike jump of different skill levels of female volleyball players. In addition, he is also interesting in the teaching and learning in biomechanics.

Back to Top

Joseph Hwang

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of Philosophy

Joe Hwang grew up in Orange County, California, and lived most of his life in Southern California. He received his BA from University of California, Irvine, double-majoring in psychology and social behavior and criminology, law, and society, and minoring in philosophy. After finishing at UC Irvine, Joe spent a year working at Waite Middle School as an after-school tutor in the AVID program (in Norwalk), and then matriculated at CSU, Fullerton in order to receive his BA in philosophy, which he received after two years. He then entered the doctoral program in philosophy at UCLA, finally receiving his PhD in the summer of 2008. Joe's area of specialization is in the history of philosophy, primarily in early modern philosophy, but he also has research interests in medieval philosophy. He also has interests in metaphysics and the philosophy of language.

Back to Top

Robert C. Jones

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of Philosophy

Robert received his PhD in philosophy from Stanford University in 2005. His dissertation, The Moral Significance of Animal Cognition, investigates the substantive properties that bear on the moral considerability of both human and nonhuman animals and argues that the key properties are specific features of a being's cognitive capacities. He further argues that, based on recent empirical findings, since there are deep and important continuities across species in these features, no fundamental distinction of moral considerability between human and nonhuman animals can be sustained. His current research interests continue to focus on the moral status of nonhuman animals as well as on food ethics, environmental ethics, mind and cognition, species studies, and the question of what it is to be human. Since his graduation from Stanford, he has been a post-doctoral fellow at Stanford University and, most recently, a visiting researcher for the Ethics in Society Project at Wesleyan University in Connecticut. Robert is, himself, a graduate of the California State University system, having earned a BA in music (Northridge) and an MA in philosophy (Los Angeles) in the Cal State System. Robert joins the faculty of California State University, Chico as assistant professor of philosophy and director of the Center for Applied and Professional Ethics.

Back to Top

David Keller

College of Natural Sciences, Department of Biological Sciences

I received my PhD in biochemistry from Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland. My primary research interest is the molecular basis for organ and cellular identity. For example, why does the heart look and function like a heart, and not like a liver? The human genome can be compared to a novel that has chapter titles such as "heart," "liver," "brain," etc. Heart and liver cells have the same genome, but heart cells read only the chapters about heart genes, ignoring the other chapters about liver, etc. In stark contrast, embryonic stem cells have the capacity to become any cell in the body. My research attempts to understand why. When I'm not in the class or lab, I’m with my 11-month-old son, Benjamin, and wife Heather.

Back to Top

Nan Li

College of Communication and Education, Department of Communication Studies

I received both my MS and PhD in communication from University of Colorado, Boulder. My general focus is organizational communication, with a specific interest in transnational corporation activities and globalization. I am interested in how globalization gradually becomes an organizing principle for nation-states, transnational corporations, and individual people. I also enjoy playing my gu qin and with my cat.

Back to Top

Joel J. Mintzes

College of Natural Sciences, Department of Biological Sciences and Department of Science Education

Dr. Joel J. Mintzes has been a college biology teacher for 35 years, the last 29 of them as professor in the Department of Biology and Marine Biology at the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. He earned BS and MS degrees in biology at the University of Illinois at Chicago and a PhD in biological science education at Northwestern University. His research focuses on conceptual development and cognitive processes in biology and environmental education. He has served on editorial boards of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and Science Education, as guest editor of the Special Issue on Learning of the International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, and as co-editor (with James H. Wandersee and Joseph D. Novak) of two books: Teaching Science for Understanding and Assessing Science Understanding: A Human Constructivist View (Elsevier Academic Press, 2005). In addition, Dr. Mintzes served as director of research of the Private Universe Project at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; lead fellow of the College Level One Team at the National Institute for Science Education, University of Wisconsin—Madison; visiting professor at the Homi Bhaba Centre for Science Education of the National Institute for Fundamental Research (Bombay, India); visiting scholar in the Ecology Department at Providence University in Taiwan; and Fulbright-Technion Fellow at the Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. He teaches courses in general biology, cell biology, and zoology and a seminar on cognition, evolution, and behavior. He now serves as professor of biology and chair of the Department of Science Education at California State University, Chico.

Back to Top

Asa Simon Mittman

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of Art and Art History

I received my BA in art history from Cornell University and my MA and PhD in art history at Stanford University. I have since taught at Santa Clara, Bucknell, and Arizona State. I am a medievalist, and my research focuses on Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman manuscripts, particularly on maps and monsters. My first book was, therefore, not surprisingly, Maps and Monsters in Medieval England, and I am working on finishing a book on the understudied and misunderstood images of monsters in the Beowulf manuscript, which I have had the great fortune to examine firsthand. I am an avid biker, an eager traveler, and doting dad.

Back to Top

Claudia Peralta Nash

College of Communication and Education, Department of Professional Studies in Education

Dr. Claudia Peralta Nash received her PhD in social, multicultural, and bilingual education, equity and cultural diversity from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 2000. For the five years preceding her move to Chico, she was the chair of the Bilingual Department, and tenured associate professor, at Boise State University. Between 1999 and 2002, she taught at CSU, Monterey Bay as a tenure-track assistant professor. Her research interests focus on bilingual education literacy and biliteracy, teacher preparation, multicultural education, and social justice. She published seven articles in those areas prior to this year. Her two 2008 publications are "Children's Issues in Uruguay" published in the Greenwood Encyclopedia of Children’s Issues Worldwide: Central and South America, and "Grooming Better Educators" in Current Issues in Teacher Education: History Perspectives, and Implications. She graduated from Chico State in 1994 with a MA in bilingual and Multicultural Education. She also received her Bachelor of Arts from CSU, Chico in 1989. Dr. Peralta Nash was born in Uruguay and moved to the United States after high school.

Back to Top

Thomas Ontiveros

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of Theatre Arts

Tom has designed lighting and/or projection for premier works by Naomi Iizuka, Charles Mee Jr., and Jessica Hagedorn as well as choreography and compositions by Paul Dresher, Mark Grey, Yolande Snaith, and Allyson Green. He has designed for projects in the Holland Festival, The International Festival of Arts & Ideas in New Haven, and the Hungarian National Theater in Cluj. Other collaborations include works with Michael Grief, Bob Balaban, and Erin Mee. Credits include Most Wanted (La Jolla Playhouse); My Old Lady, Visions of Kerouac, Indiscretions, Candida (Marin Theatre Company); The Exonerated (New York Premier); Miss Julie, Women Center Stage Festival (The Culture Project); Full Circle (Danspace/Allyson Green Dance); Doppelganger (3LD); A Dance Party (K.J. Holmes-Joyce SOHO); Sonny's Blues, Angel Face (Word for Word, SF); Only Sound Remains (Yolande Snaith); Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music (Santa Cruz Civic); First Love, Schrodinger's Girlfriend (Dean Goodman Award); Summertime, First Love (Magic Theatre); Contagion, Funny House of a Negro (Dean Goodman Award); The Language of Angels (Intersection); Tattoo Girl (Sledgehammer).

Back to Top

Fulvio Orsitto

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Italian Program

He received a BA in Italian literature (1998) and a BA in film and media studies (2001) from the University of Turin, Italy. He received a Master of Arts in Italian at the University of Connecticut (2003) and a Master in Film Studies (2004) at the University of Turin, Italy. He recently received his PhD in Italian from the University of Connecticut. He has conducted research and published on Italian cinema and literature, and he is currently working on Italian American cinema and also on trans-national Italian cinema. Before coming to the United States, he lived in Nice, on the French Riviera, and has traveled quite extensively and spent time in Morocco, Turkey, Lebanon, and basically everywhere in Europe. When he is not traveling, watching a film, or driving his convertible, he is probably cooking some Italian dish.

Back to Top

Lisa Ott

College of Natural Sciences, Department of Chemistry

Lisa grew up in Penryn, California, and is glad to be back in Northern California. She spent four years in Salem, Oregon, graduating with an undergraduate degree in chemistry from Willamette University. Next, she spent seven years in Fort Collins, Colorado, first earning a PhD in chemistry from Colorado State University and then spending two years as a National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council postdoctoral associate at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Lisa's research interests include alternative fuels and feedstocks, nanocluster chemistry, and catalysis. When she’s not in the classroom or in the lab, Lisa can be found running, cycling, swimming, hiking, and floating rivers up and down the North State with her husband, Radley, and their two dogs.

Back to Top

Kevin Patton

College of Communication and Education, Department of Kinesiology

He received his masters from CSU, Chico and his EdD in teacher education (emphasis in physical education) from the University of Massachusetts. Prior to coming to Chico, he served as an assistant professor at the University of Northern Colorado. His research is focused on the promotion of physical activity in the context of physical education reform and teacher change. He enjoys biking and other physical activities with his wife and children, keeping up with the latest technology, and frequently cooks and brews.

Back to Top

Michael Rehg

College of Business, Department of Management

I come to Chico State from the United States Air Force, specifically Dayton, Ohio, where I taught at the Air Force Institute of Technology for the last three years. Prior to that I served in the USAF for 20 years as an aircraft maintenance officer, and as an academic. I obtained my terminal degree from Indiana University in 1998, with an emphasis in strategic management. My research interests focus on whistleblowing, the effects of the work environment on training, and the effects of national culture on individual behavior. I am married with two daughters, both under the age of 2, and I enjoy cycling as a hobby.

Back to Top

Ruben Sargsyan

College of Behavioral and Social Science, Department of Economics

I received my MS degree in economics from the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and a PhD in economics from Kansas State University. I taught at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and Kansas State University prior to my appointment at CSU, Chico. My research interests include international trade and open economy macroeconomics. My most recent works discuss welfare effects of trade policies such as the U.S. Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act, and tariff and domestic tax reforms under imperfect competition. Besides exploring the fascinating world of economics, I enjoy playing chess, traveling around the world, and spending time with my 2-year-old son.

Back to Top

Al Schademan

College of Communication and Education, Department of Education, Single Subjects Program

I received my PhD from the University of Rochester in Teaching and Curriculum. My research focuses upon the significant forms of reasoning that youth from non-dominant groups learn through cultural-historical practices. The research is designed to inform educators, especially those in science and mathematics education, of the rich and valuable resources that students from non-dominant groups bring with them to classrooms. It is my hope that the research can help mitigate the deficit views that educators often have of these youth, and to provide insights into some of the resources that could be drawn upon in the creation of culturally relevant pedagogies. I have a partner, Jeannie, and a 9-year old son Connor. We love to hike, explore nature, and swim in the cool, clear pools in Upper Bidwell Park. I also enjoy mountain biking, mountaineering, rock climbing, and playing the guitar and singing.

Back to Top

Jodi Shepherd

Meriam Library, Political Science, Social Work, and Law Librarian

I received my BA in political science from Oregon State University and my Master's of Library Science from Indiana University, Bloomington. While at IU I also received a graduate certificate in public administration from the School of Public and Environmental Administration. From 2006–2008 I worked as the social sciences librarian at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan. Between undergraduate and graduate schools, I lived in Alaska and Oregon as a raft guide. I have had the opportunity to study abroad in Switzerland in 1996–1997 and Germany in 2000–2001; while living abroad, I traveled to 22 countries in Eastern and Western Europe and enjoy experiencing new cultures and countries. In my spare time I enjoy hiking, kayaking, and camping.

Back to Top

Natalya Shkoda

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of Music

Dr. Natalya Shkoda joined the Music Department at California State University, Chico, as an assistant professor of piano and coordinator of keyboard studies in the fall 2008. A native of Kharkiv, Ukraine, Dr. Shkoda holds degrees and diplomas from Arizona State University (2006, Doctor of Musical Arts in piano performance; 2001, Master of Music in piano performance), the Kharkiv State University of the Arts (1999, diplomas with distinction in piano and musicology and concert performer's qualification), and the Kharkiv Special Music School for Gifted Children in Ukraine (1994, diploma with the gold medal in piano and composition).

Since presenting her first solo recital and winning her first National Composer's Competition in Kiev, Ukraine, at the age 13, Natalya Shkoda performed numerous solo, accompanying, and chamber music recitals in Ukraine, Russia, Latvia, Lithuania, the Czech Republic, France, and throughout the U.S. She has appeared as a soloist with the MasterWorks Symphony Orchestra in Houghton, New York, and the Mesa Symphony Orchestra in Mesa, Arizona. Dr. Shkoda is a laureate of the National Competitions for the Young Composers in Ukraine (1990 and 1993, Kiev; 1996, Odesa); winner of the Young Journalists' Contests (1998 and 1999, Kharkiv); winner of the Joseph and Ida Klatzkin Competitions for the Contemporary American Keyboard Music in both harpsichord (2000) and piano (2005); and winner of the MasterWorks Festival Concerto Competitions in Houghton, New York (both in 1997 and 2000).

Dr. Shkoda's most recent performances included recitals at the prestigious Ukrainian Institute of America in New York City, the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art in Chicago, and the Washington Group Cultural Fund Recital Series in Alexandria, Virginia. Natalya Shkoda's performances and compositions were broadcast by the numerous state radio and television companies in her native Ukraine as well as in the United States, London, Brussels, and New Zealand.

Natalya Shkoda's debut commercial CD featuring the first Western recording of "Eleven Etudes in the Form of Old Dances," Opus 19, by Viktor Kosenko was released on the Toccata Classics label in London in 2006 and received outstanding reviews both in the U.S. and internationally.

Back to Top

Hope Smith

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of Music

Hope Munro Smith earned her PhD in ethnomusicology from the University of Texas at Austin in 2001. Her dissertation is based on fieldwork conducted in Trinidad and Tobago from 1998–1999 and focuses on the Caribbean popular song genres calypso and soca, as well as the music of the Trinidad steel band. Dr. Smith is an accomplished musician and has played in a variety of musical ensembles, including the University of Texas's Gamelan Kyahi Rosowibowo and the University of Texas Brazilian and Afro-Caribbean ensembles, and she was a founding member of the University of Texas steel band. Dr. Smith has done a number of musical collaborations since she moved to California and looks forward to future musical endeavors in the Chico community.

Back to Top

Teresa Traver

College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Department of English

Teresa Huffman Traver earned her PhD in English literature from the University of Notre Dame. She specializes in 19th-century British literature. Her research explores the intersection of national identity, religious identity, and domesticity within mid-century novels by Charlotte Brontë, John Henry Newman, Margaret Oliphant, and Charles Dickens. She believes that the most effective way to read is with a cup of coffee in one hand, a book in the other, and a purring housecat on one's lap; she suspects that this method works best when one is reading mysteries or fantasy novels, but further investigation is required.

Back to Top

Paul Viotti

College of Behavioral and Social Science, Department of Political Science

Paul Viotti is currently investigating Americans' attitudes toward economic inequality. Contrary to the widespread view that Americans are self-interested individualists, he finds through experimental and survey work that Americans hold wide-ranging, divergent views of economic inequality and that many would be willing to pay a significant price to obtain greater equality. Before joining the Political Science Department at CSU, Chico, Paul Viotti received a PhD in politics and MS in applied economics and finance at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His teaching interests include public administration and international politics.

Back to Top

Shelley Von Berg

College of Communication and Education, Department of Communication Arts and Sciences

Shelley Von Berg received her BA in journalism from CSU, Chico, after which she spent 10 years as a business writer in the U.S. and abroad. She earned her master's and doctorate degrees from the University of Nevada, Reno, where she worked in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology. Areas of interest are neurogenic speech disorders, including childhood apraxia of speech and the dysarthrias. Dr. Von Berg has traveled to Africa to meet individuals from various groups and to collect speech samples. She enjoys hiking, grape stomping, and cross-country skiing.

Back to Top