Institute for Sustainable Development

 

Our Sustainable Future - CSU, Chico

Friday, November 6th, 2009
Conference Schedule

Concurrent sessions will be held in the Bell Memorial Union (BMU) or Student Services Center (SSC) unless otherwise stated. Registration starts at 8:00 a.m. with a continental breakfast buffet in BMU 100. (View map)

Please note: This page continues to be under construction. This schedule may be subject to change and we will continue to update this web site weekly through October 30th.

8:00 - 11:00 TOUR-BCCER
9:00 - 3:15 Mining Symposium
10:00 - 4:00 CSU Climate Action Planning Workshop
9:00 - 9:50 Concurrent Sessions
10:00 - 10:50 Concurrent Sessions
11:00 - 12:15 Keynote
1:00 - 1:50 Concurrent Sessions
2:00 - 3:15 Concurrent Sessions
3:30 - 4:45 Keynote
Networking - Night on the Town

TOUR - 8:00-11:00 a.m.
Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve (BCCER)


Tour the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve
BCCER Hiking Tour
Mark Lynch, Education Coordinator

Reserves at CSU, Chico
Enjoy a tour on the 4,000-acre ecological reserve, positioned in the rural/urban interface zone just outside of Chico. Learn about the management of BCCER and the numerous programs operating on the Reserve.  Take part in a discussion on the delicate balance of managing the Reserve for human uses, yet maintaining the health of critical habitat for numerous plant and animal species.  

Maximum group of 15 people so sign up for this in advance via e-mail to: bccereducation@csuchico.edu
Group to meet at 8:00 a.m. at the 2nd Street entrance of the BMU and carpool to the reserves.
http://www.csuchico.edu/bccer/

BMU 302 and 304
Full Day Symposium
9:00-3:15

(See program agenda, pdf file)
Transforming Mining’s Toxic Legacy:  A Greener Future for Communities Impacted by California’s Gold Rush
Organizers: Mike Thornton- Sierra Fund, Izzy Martin- CEO Sierra Fund and Randy Senock, CSU, Chico

The Sierra Fund and the CSU, Chico Geological and Environmental Science Department bring you a one-day symposium on mining toxins in the Sierra Nevada. The symposium will bring together a wide range of experts from each the environmental, social, and policy fields of mitigation and restoration of California’s most important watersheds. More than 60 percent of the drinking water in the State originates in an area where mercury, acid mine drainage, and other contaminated sediments left behind from mining have accumulated. The presence of toxins in the Sacramento River, San Joaquin Delta and San Francisco Bay is an issue, and the Sierra Nevada watersheds are a significant source of those toxins. We will examine in detail the historical legacy and future challenges in the Sierra Nevada.
The goal of this symposium is to begin forming a Mining Toxins Working Group combining stakeholders from tribal and community leaders, academic, government, and medical researchers to ensure effective public awareness and information exchange.

CSU Climate Action Planning Workshop
Kendall 207/209
10:00-4:00

(See Program agenda, pdf file)
Send separate registration confirmation via e-mail to Gina Bacigalupi at gbacigalupi@horizon.csueastbay.edu by November 1.

Karina Garbesi, Professor, Environmental Studies- CSU, East Bay
The CSU is woefully behind in Climate Action Planning (CAP). In this workshop CSU faculty, administrators, staff, and students from across the CSU system will collaborate to create a model CAP framework for adoption by the CSU campuses based on existing best models.  

Participants will work from planning matrices based on existing CAPs. Many campuses have already adopted CAPs. Every University of California campus is required plan for carbon neutrality under the University of California Office of the President’s Policy on Sustainable Practices. http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/sustainability/policy.html

In a series of meetings over the past two years members of many CSU campuses have agreed to collaborate on various aspects of climate action planning (CAP) for CSU. Here we fulfill those commitments.

We especially need faculty, administration, staff, and students in certain key roles at the universities: finance, planning, architecture, energy management, facilities management, procurement, student government, and associated academic fields (e.g., environmental studies, energy studies, environmental science, engineering, public administration, sustainable resource management, green business, communication, and related fields). New CSU participants welcome!!

Concurrent Sessions
9:00-9:50 a.m.

BMU 204
9:00-9:50

Oh, What's Air Got to Do With it?
Pam Figge and Gail Williams - CSU, Chico
Stepping back to the turn of the 20th century, this session traces the modes of transportation spawned by various land use patterns within the United States – all leading to what is commonly referred to as “sprawl.”  The session will also acquaint attendees with the goals of the federal Clean Air Act, how air quality is measured, the compliance status of our own air basin and the health effects of air pollution.  The session concludes with lessons on how to plan for both sustainable communities and good air quality.

BMU 209
9:00-9:50
Unintended Consequences: Recycling and Metal Theft
Jesse Dizard- CSU, Chico
We are all encouraged to recycle- but what are the effects of recycling at global, regional and local levels? This presentation explores one aspect of unintended consequences in terms of how recycling incentives encourage metal theft and also supports illegal drug consumption in California.

BMU 210
9:00-9:50
Tools for a Successful Zero Waste Program
Mandi McKay and Cheri Chastain- Sierra Nevada Brewing Company
This presentation will provide the audience with a case study and tools for achieving a zero waste program.  Mandi and Cheri will cover how Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. has reached a 99.5 percent diversion rate through inventive reuse, recycling and composting programs. They will discuss how to get participants educated and enthusiastic, build partnership opportunities within your community, and keep track of progress.
Will be available via webcast (see instructions, pdf file)

BMU 303
9:00-9:50
Pedal your way to a better community
Karen Goodwin- Butte Bicycle Coalition
The automobile is the single largest source of US air pollution.  More than 40 percent of all car trips in the country are two miles or less. These short trips (up to three times more polluting per mile than long trips) are ideal distances to do on a bike.  Every mile you bicycle saves approximately one pound of CO2.  Today’s traffic makes bicycling intimidating for most commuters however.  This presentation will explore the benefits of cycling to the environment and offer a survival guide to safe street cycling.  You want to make a difference?  Start pedaling.

BMU 312
9:00-9:50
The Implications of Climate Change for Fresno, California
Donald Hunsaker- ICOA, Peter Van De Water, Fraka Harmsen, and Vivien Luo- CSU, Fresno
An interdisciplinary team of faculty members working through the Institute of Climate Change, Oceans and Atmosphere (ICOA) at CSU, Fresno, identified potential direct and indirect effects of climate change on the Fresno area. Key impacts include changes in the time/duration of precipitation, extended heat spells and associated public/worker health effects, changes in crops grown, extended air pollution seasons, severe summer smog levels, increased wildfire risk, and effects on forests and associated recreation and timber production.  These impacts, as well as corresponding mitigation and adaptation strategies developed, will be discussed. Results of this study are being used by ICOA and city staff to develop future work in sustainability.

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Concurrent Sessions
10:00-10:50 a.m.

BMU 204
10:00-10:50
Growing the Green Workforce: Developing green job education and training programs for schools and communities
Morgan King- Strategic Energy Innovations
To meet the demand for a burgeoning green collar workforce, we need strong education and training programs that are integrated into existing community institutions and school curriculum. Drawing on SEI's work in this area, this session outlines how to integrate educational institutions and local partnerships with a strong vision for community sustainability to launch innovative community-based green collar training programs.

BMU 209
10:00-10:50
Community Based Micro Hydropower Projects in Developing Countries- A Case Study from Bhutan
Chhimi Dorji- Humboldt State University
A demonstration project was funded by UNDP/GEF at Sengor, Mongar, Bhutan to install and pilot a 100kW community based micro hydropower system. Information about Bhutan and its relation to hydropower, processes involved in planning, designing and execution of the community micro hydro power for sustainable livelihood would be presented. There are lessons learned from this project in Bhutan which could be replicated in other parts of the world and some discussion topics include about the whole issue of electrification, micro hydropower, community management and income generation.

BMU 210
10:00-10:50
Food & Sustainability: Increasing Sustainability on Campus and in The Community – Lessons from the Urban & Environmental Policy Institute Occidental College
Mark Vallianatos- Urban & Environmental Policy Institute
Learn about the unique hybrid campus/community model in practice at the UEPI at Occidental College in Los Angeles. UEPI is an organization based on community-action and social justice. For 12 years, it has led the Farm to School movement in CA and across the nation. This movement has grown to 40 states and more than 2,000 school districts, bringing freshly grown foods to schools directly from their local farmers.  Our Sustainable Oxy program is focused on increasing sustainability at college campuses by engaging students in efforts to reduce GHG emissions, promote alternative energy and transportation, and advocate for more local foods in the cafeteria. Join us and learn how to implement effective farm to institution programs or environmental sustainability initiatives on your campus or community.
Will be available via webcast (see instructions, pdf file)

BMU 303
10:00-10:50
Green Poets
Sally McNall-CSU, Chico
Poet Sally McNall presents an invitational and ope-mic reading of poems about the natural world. Poets will read from their own poems that reflect their understanding and interpretation of the natural world.

BMU 312
10:00-10:50
Revolutionary Green Tech Company Converts CO2 Into Useful Products
Kristin Cooper Carter, Calera Corporation
Calera Corporation captures carbon dioxide (CO2) from the burning of fossil fuel and converts it into carbon-negative building materials, enabling the production of green power, cement, fresh water and other products to promote sustainable growth. The process can capture other emissions, including sulfur dioxide, particulate matter, mercury, and other metals.  Calera's carbon-negative aggregate can be used to make concrete, asphalt, and other building applications, and its supplementary cementitious material can enhance the strength of concrete and supplant a portion of the cement in concrete blends.

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KEYNOTE
11:00-12:15

Bell Memorial Union Auditorium

John Peterson Myers

A Revolution in Environmental Health Sciences: Opening New Opportunities to Prevent Disease
A revolution in the environmental health sciences that has unfolded over the past decade is revealing that common materials once thought safe and now widely used in consumer products are likely to be contributing to many human diseases. The chemical exposures that result from these uses alter the ways that genes behave by interfering with the mechanisms that control gene expression.  The exposures are now linked to a diverse array of human disease, including breast and prostate cancer, infertility, uterine fibroids and polycystic ovaries, as well as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity.  While these discoveries are worrisome, they also point toward important opportunities to intervene, and the possibility of disease prevention.  Achieving that goal will require a new generation of materials designed using green chemistry, and a new set of public health standards that incorporate this new science.

Book signing to follow outside BMU Auditorium at 12:30 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions
1:00-1:50

SSC 150
1:00-1:50
Moving Forward: Community Colleges and Sustainability
Melinda Riley- Butte Community College and Dale A. van Dam-Folsom Lake College

This panel will be discuss the efforts and progress of Community Colleges in integrating the principle of sustainability into their curriculum and green workforce development. Join the discussion with experts from various California schools.

BMU 204
1:00-1:50
Nuclear Energy is Not Pollution Free
Divan Fard- Shasta College

This session will discuss the consequence of using nuclear reactors and the nuclear waste produced, and the nature and amount of  nuclear waste stored at Hanford Nuclear Reservation. It will also address the contamination of ground water in Hanford Nuclear Reservation, the future contamination of the Colombia River and Pacific Ocean with radiactive waste. And finally, the current plan for storing nuclear wastes in the United States, cost and future problems.

BMU 209
1:00-1:50
How To Kick the Single-Use Disposable Product Habit: Including Political Action, Facts, Environmental-Impact, Tips, and Solutions!
Andy Keller-ChicoBagRachel Gomes & Jasmine Jones- Environmental Advocates, CLIC Chico
This presentation will show the detrimental impact of single-use products, specifically plastic bags, on our environment. With surprising statistics and photographs, you will see how harmful plastics can be toward marine life, our natural resources, and aesthetic enjoyment. We will provide solutions to these problems by discussing durability as an ethic and a key driver to sustainability. We will also highlight global trends, and uncover the regional political battles over the reduction and elimination of environmentally harmful single-use products.  If you want to kick your single-use habit and get involved in our reusable future - this is a must-attend session.

BMU 210
1:00-1:50
Paul Turner- CEO Nacel Energy Corporation
Distributed Green Energy:  Bring Back the Good ‘Ole Days
Negative externalities associated with interconnecting to and expanding the high-voltage transmission system combined with efficiency advances in green energy generation technology is challenging this paradigm.  The recent credit crises has forced the capital markets to become more interested in examining ways to reduce concentration risk associated with the long development cycles of large-scale wind and solar energy projects.  Combined with the increase in system reliability associated with a “Distributed Green Energy” model the traditional large-scale project development model is under attack.  The focus of the presentation will be to examine the pros and cons of this new generation model that will reduce the U.S. dependence on foreign oil (direct and indirect), reduce the rate of growth in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, reduce the number of new high-voltage transmission lines that need to be built in the U.S. while shortening the risk to lenders and investors as these smaller but more numerous generating assets come on-line more quickly and efficiently.
Itziar Martinez De Alegria - University of the Basque Country
Itziar Martinez De Alegria will discuss the current energy policy regarding the promotion of renewable energy sources and energy efficiency, including aspects related with the Climate Change. The European Union's (EU) "Clean Energy Strategy." Where are we going? The policy that the EU is adopting nowadays will explain in a great part our future energy model. But are we adopting the right decisions? Which are the main problems of this strategy?
Will be available via webcast (see instructions, pdf file)

BMU 303
1:00-1:50
Take Back the Tap: How to Protect our Water
Corie Lopez- Food & Water Watch

With two-thirds of the world’s population expected to run short of fresh drinking water by 2025, water is being referred to as “the oil of the twenty-first century.” This session is designed to give an overview of our nation's water system, who controls our water, water privatization, and the condition of our waterways. We will highlight Food & Water Watch water campaigns and the communities we are working with throughout the United States. In addition, tools will be provided for people to get involved in our campaigns and “Take Back the Tap” in their local community!

BMU 312
1:00-1:50
Community, Campus, and Classroom: Spinning the Web of Sustainable Practices
Sara McCurry and Pamela Spoto- Shasta College

This session will discuss innovative methods for infusing sustainability into the classroom and beyond. Pamela and Sara, English faculty at Shasta College, Redding, will present their experiences infusing sustainability into composition curriculum and campus activities.  This presentation will provide information useful to faculty of other disciplines as well.  Categories of discussion will include sustainable curriculum development and innovative methods of presenting a sustainable ethos outside the classroom, including student essay contests, guest lectures, campus clubs, forums, conferences, and local grassroots organizations.  After presenting, panelists will lead a facilitated discussion exploring these ideas and methods.

BMU 314
1:00-1:50
The Green Dorm Project – Utilizing Real-time Feedback to Foster Sustainable Behaviors and Demonstrable Energy Savings
Morgan King- Strategic Energy Innovations

Occupant behaviors account for up to 50 percent of a residential building’s total energy use. Dorm residents have little to no incentives to conserve energy.  How can we foster behavior change in a group not financially responsible for their resource consumption? Real time energy feedback addresses this issue by publicly displaying energy consumption, energy costs, and GHG emissions associated with a dorm’s operation. With real time feedback and educational programming, residents are in a better position to develop sustainable behaviors.  Morgan will draw on five years of experience implementing Green Dorm Projects to illustrate how a modest project can foster behavior change, generate demonstrable energy and cost savings, and facilitate a larger move towards sustainability.

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Concurrent Sessions
2:00-3:15

BMU 204
2:00-3:15
The place of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in the provision of sustainable health care and the attainment of health in America
Joel Zimbelman-  CSU, Chico, Glen Jarosz, Patrick Giammarise, Higgy Lerner-  Chico Private Health Care Providers
A number of individuals have suggested that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and health practices should be part of the mix of health care reform.  This panel will discuss various questions:  What is the relationship between health care reform and sustainability?  What is CAM and how does it compare and relate to conventional health care? What evidence is there that conventional medicine or CAM actually results in benefits to patients and society? How should these issues inform public policy on health care?


BMU 209

2:00-3:15
The Time for Green Ethics is Now
Steve Tchudi-Chico Peace & Justice Center, Gerard Ungerman- Free Will Productions, Liza Tedesco- Chico Natural Foods,  and Ken Logan- MD
This session will address the ethics of sustainability through community-building and development, specifically focusing on balancing the social, economic and environmental needs of our communities and planet. Balancing societal needs and environmental protection demands a shift in our approach to the world, from focusing on the individual to focusing on the larger community.  Without this shift sustainability is unattainable. This session will address a variety of topics, including the ethics of our current healthcare system and dumping of pharmaceutical byproducts, community building and sharing of resources, the Fair Trade movement, and the excessive military budget that, if redirected, could be used to address the various social and economic needs.


BMU 210
2:00-3:15
Overpopulation and Other Failures of the Modern Environmental Movement
Ben Zuckerman-UCLA,  Dick Schneider- Californians for Population Stabilization, Paul Watson- Sea Shepherd Conservation Society
Overpopulation is a fundamental obstacle to sustainability. Unless populations stop growing, continued growth will cancel out reductions in consumption made by individuals and societies. California is projected to add 22 million people in the next 40 years, a 60 percent increase in population, overwhelming the efforts to reduce fossil fuel use, stop sprawl, limit traffic congestion, and improve air quality. Failure to confront overpopulation is just one example of how the modern environmental movement is failing to protect wild nature, conserve natural resources, and maintain quality of life. The panelists, veterans of Sierra Club’s battle on immigration policy, will discuss that controversy in the context of United States and California population growth and its inevitable consequences. They also will discuss other key omissions from the contemporary environmental movement’s agenda and offer ways to address these problems.
Will be available via webcast (see instructions, pdf file)

BMU 303
2:00-3:15
Successful Clean Water Strategies for Municipalities and a Pilot Multi-disciplinary Curriculum Teaching Biofiltration at Butte College
Jennifer Oman, Nena Anguiano, Diane Schmidt and Michael Williams - Butte College - and CSU, Chico MESA Students

This presentation provides examples of improving community support for sustainable environmental change. The City of Chico Storm Water Management Education and Outreach Program (SWM EOP) results are examined as a model for improving local water quality though public engagement.  The presentation illustrates how the Butte College MESA students link to the SWM EOP.  The students will share their Biofiltration Wetland Education Learning Laboratory (BeWELL) Project, intending to prevent parking lot storm water runoff from directly entering Clear Creek.  The goals of the SWM EOP were to develop awareness, modify attitudes, and change behavior related to water quality issues; all these goals have been achieved as demonstrated in post-outreach surveys 2008-2009. 

BMU 314
2:00-3:15
Transition Towns Movement
Marion Harmon- CSU, Chico, Peter Hollingsworth- Transition Chico,  Karen Goodwin- Butte Bicycle Coalition

The Transition Towns movement addresses, at the community level, the triple threat of climate change, peak oil and economic crisis. It is a vibrant grassroots movement that builds community resilience in as we approach a post-oil, low-carbon future. Starting with the town of Totnes in Devon, England in 2006, the movement has spread like wildfire across the globe and an increasing number of U.S. towns are becoming “Transition Towns.” Find out why Transition represents one of the most promising ways of engaging people and communities to take on the challenges, and discuss ways to bring Transition to Chico. Together we can make a difference.

SSC 150
2:00-3:15
Food Community and Democracy in Chico, the North State, and Beyond
Lori Weber- Slow Food Shasta Cascade, John Luvaas- Chico Grange, Bryan Shaw - Chico Natural Foods, Francine Stuelpnagel- GRUB, LaDona Knigge- CSU, Chico, and Jeremy Miller- Chico Food Network
Representatives from local organizations will speak toward the theme of “food community and democracy.” The panel will be lead by a talk from Dr. LaDona Knigge on “civic agriculture.” The food sustainability movement underscores the connection between food, the people that produce and consume the food, their communities, and U.S. democracy.  These organizations provides unique contributions to community and democracy in Chico and the North State.  The goal of this panel is to provide forum for attendees and presenters to discuss these contributions, and raise consciousness about the inextricable link between the health of our food and political systems.

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KEYNOTE
3:30-4:45

Bell Memorial Union Auditorium

Andrew Szasz

Can We Shop Our Way to a Sustainable Future?
Last Christmas was the greenest Christmas ever.  Advertisements loudly proclaimed various products’ environmental, Earth-friendly benefits.  Organically grown; natural; toxics-free; smaller carbon footprint.  Consumers, at least upper middle class consumers, responded well.  Sales of organic foods have been rising by about 20 percent per year.  Hybrid cars are suddenly everywhere; Toyota can’t sell enough Priuses.  In academia, social scientists are increasingly interested in green consumption as a new form of environmental activism.  In this talk, I look at the evidence at hand and begin to evaluation what green consuming can – and can’t – do.  I consider both the material impacts – what effects making green choices, aggregated over millions of individual choices, can have in terms of actually creating markets for alternative goods, as well as the uncertain psychological impacts. Will acts of green consuming end up making the consumer more political, more aware, more motivated to support systemic reforms, or will those acts, instead, make the consumer complacent and self-satisfied, therefore less interested in other forms of environmental activism?

Book signing to follow at 5:00 p.m. outside BMU Auditorium.

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Networking - Night on the Town
Friday and Saturday Nights

This is a great opportunity for conference attendees to mingle together after a full day of sessions. The night out will showcase some of our favorite, local restaurants in downtown Chico that are within walking distance from campus. Reservations have been made in advance for groups of 6-10. Participants pay for themselves. There are sign-up sheets at the registration tables with restaurant details and directions. Sign up with friends or sign up alone and meet new ones!

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