Institute for Sustainable Development
Greenie Award bamboo

Congratulations to all who participated, this was an awesome year!

Sponsored by the Rawlins Endowment for Environmental Literacy

 

Our Sustainable Future - CSU, Chico

Higher Education Greenie Nominations 2018

The Higher Education Greenie Awards this year will recognize student groups from all CSU campuses only. Winning student groups will receive cash award prizes to support and enhance their projects. These awards are sponsored by the Rawlins Endowment for Environmental Literacy and are in the following amounts:

1st Place Winner $200
2nd Place Winner $150
3rd Place Winner $100

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR 2018 GREENIE AWARD WINNERS!

CSU, Chico Scoop CSU, Sacramento CSU, Northridge
CSU, East Bay Humboldt State University CSU, Chico CSHC
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1ST PLACE WINNERS
SCOOP - Sustainable Consultations of Office Practices
CSU, Chico

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Meriam Library Management Office
Sustainability Consultations of Office Practices (SCOOP) will be conducting its sustainability evaluation in the office of Chico State's Meriam Library Management Office. Like traditional audits performed by this campus club, we will provide the faculty and staff with important information on their usage of energy, waste management, procurement, transportation, and employee health and wellness. Along with those facets, SCOOP is going to award the office a certificate with the appropriate level of sustainable achievement. Also, we will offer power strips, recycled-paper notepads, and "turn off" stickers for light switches. We hope to enlighten those within the department to the ease and benefits of sustainable office practices.

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SECOND PLACE WINNERS
Tiny House Team
CSU, Sacramento

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Tiny House Control System
A group of Sacramento State students redefine the world of tiny homes with something they like to call a “Tiny House Control System”. This system is not only aesthetically intriguing, its benefits also far outweigh the cost of this affordable system. Imagine a Tiny House capable of detecting its surroundings ambient temperature, gathering useful data, and then making minor changes to the temperature and brightness of the home as needed (with a solar hot water heater). This means that the useful data that was mentioned is a snapshot of the home’s performance and can be evaluated to make a smart Tiny House. This also means that wasteful energy usage can be virtually eliminated and can maximize the efficiency of a Tiny Home. According to mechanical engineering professor Rustin Vogt the Tiny House is a “Lab research platform used for students to expand on”. This system could be replicated with the use of simplistic home hobbits hardware that was used in this project. The Control System is a Segway to a new world of smart homes that even the mayor of Sacramento wants to join in on; hoping to rid the surrounding areas of housing insecurities with a tiny home initiative. The purpose of this project was initially to allow the average person to easily identify how their energy is being used, but in the larger picture once they’ve identified how energy is being used they can then make environmentally smart decisions based on that usage data. Luckily this system is low maintenance and once installed to the Tiny Home will be easy to use and easy to update; allowing for minimal energy usage and maximal sustainability. We hope you join Sacramento State students to combat wasteful energy usage and help save the environment one Tiny House at a time.

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THIRD PLACE WINNERS
Crop Science Horticulture Club (CSHC)
CSU, Chico

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The CSU, Chico Crop Science and Horticulture Club (CSHC) is a student-led organization dedicated to connecting people together who share a common interest in food and agriculture.  We recognize that a sustainable community must facilitate the physical, mental, environmental, and economic wellbeing of its members.  The construction of community gardens is an ideal way of promoting all of these values in children when they are highly receptive to growing and eating vegetables and enjoying the physical and emotional exhilaration of playing in a garden.  Ultimately, doing gardening with children is a learning activity that empowers the children to understand about taking control of their own nutrition and health.  During the last two years, the CSHC have been collaborating with the Chico State Organic Vegetable Project (OVP), CAL Fresh, and three local elementary schools to establish gardens at the schools.  Club members help plan, construct gardens, propagate plants, establish irrigation, and teach students how to grow vegetables.  At just one of our schools the result has provided 643 students with a long-lasting source of nutritious food and opportunities for endless gardening activities.  Sierra View Elementary, alone, typically has 2,000 students a month come to visit the garden.  Parents praise the program saying, “our children now pick out tomatoes and zucchini at the grocery store when before they would have nothing to do with them.”  At the same time, the garden programs have engendered our CSHC members an enhanced appreciation of the importance and satisfaction of civic engagement.  This program allows us to facilitate our future farmers at a young age and teach them the importance of growing sustainably.

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The Food Recovery Network
CSU, Northridge

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Food Recovery Network
The Food Recovery Network at California State University Northridge (FRN@CSUN) is a recognized student club. This organization is a chapter of the nationwide Food Recovery Network, which composed more than 100 chapters across the country. FRN@CSUN was founded in 2014 by only 5 nutrition and food science students. Our mission is to divert nutritious food from the landfill and feed it to vulnerable, food-insecure people. We collect unsold and perfectly edible food from dining locations on campus and deliver it to local shelters and student organizations. Since our inception, we have recovered roughly 15,000 pounds of fresh food. The FRN@CSUN is sustained by student leaders who oversee the club’s activities. We envision the organization to run as a student club that elects officers who strive to lead recovery efforts and an expansion program, until edible food is no longer being wasted. Other campus can start their own Food Recovery Network chapter, and we can provide the tools to assist other campuses start recovering food today. FRN@CSUN follows the 3 E’s of Sustainability. For our Economy, we re-purpose the investments of growing, processing, and shipping food in order to feed those who can’t afford a meal. This places less burden on financial assistance programs offered by local organizations and our government. For Ecology, we are diverting “trash” from the landfill where it would rot and release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Equity is our biggest priority. We believe no one should go to bed hungry, especially when nutritious food is being wasted every day. By recovering food, we have a great impact on our campus sustainability and social justice efforts. Together, we can all work to create a sustainable food system in which no food is wasted.

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Sustainable Office Assessment Program - SOAP
CSU, East Bay

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Sustainable Office Assessment Program - SOAP
SOAP is a Sustainable Office Assessment Program that empowers employees to develop sustainable habits and practices that will lead to operational improvement in the workplace. Additionally, SOAP provides opportunities for students to improve personally, professionally, and sustainably through various workshops, training, and services. SOAP creates an engaging environment by providing employees and students with outlets necessary to both build and reinforce sustainable change in both the campus and community. By utilizing the SOAP Checklist, an excel application that provides tools and resources for employees to sustainably improve their workplace ecosystems, employees become familiar with the importance of sustainability in five major areas: energy, transportation, employee wellness, waste management, and food & packaged goods. Additionally, SOAP provides opportunities for students to improve their professional development skills through personal development workshops and community service opportunities. This environment is supported by a community of students that make up the SOAP Crew, a club dedicated to assessing employee performance, providing office improvement solutions, and creating development opportunities for students. SOAP’s assessment system operates with a three-tier system, where offices are given the choice to be assessed as either an individual, a department, or an entire building. Each tier follows the same six-step ranking system, starting at Beginner, then Traveler, and Bronze to Platinum Pioneer respectively. After selecting their respective tier, offices challenge themselves by going through the SOAP Checklist and completing the tasks it provides. Each task is organized based on the five major areas discussed above. After completing as many tasks as they can, offices then schedule to go through a SOAP Walkthrough, where the SOAP Crew “walks through” their office to assess their self-evaluation, reinforce the tasks done correctly, and provide tips on how to receive a better rating for next time, resulting in offices learning more about themselves and sustainability.

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Green Campus Team
Humboldt State University

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Power Down HSU
Green Campus (G.C.) promotes an event called Power Down. On Power Down, which are held once a month, our organization encourages the entire campus to “power down” by any means possible. On Power Down days, we motivate students, faculty, and staff to consume less energy. This can be done by asking professors to not use the projector, have class outside if possible, or keep at least half the lights off in the classroom. For staff members, we encourage their office to utilize natural light coming through the windows and leave the lights off as much as possible throughout the day as well as utilize power strips and not use personal appliances. G.C. also likes to inspire both off-campus and dorm resident students to save energy through various practices. We release fliers and post on social media with some tips on how students can help us save energy. G.C. also spreads a slogan around campus to remind people of a simple way to save energy; “Energy Savers Do It In The Dark.” There are many other creative things students, staff, and faculty do to save energy on Power Down days that G.C. missed, but in the end HSU is working together to minimize its energy consumption. Before a Power Down event, G.C. releases mini fliers, posts on social media, chalks around campus, writes on white boards, does class announcements and emails our mailing list reminding HSU when Power Down dates are. On a Power Down day, G. C.s’ team will go around campus turning off unneeded lights, computers, and write on more white boards while wearing bandannas with its logo on them to create awareness of our actions. In the end, we analyze our actions to see how much of an impact a Power Down day had.

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