Charlie's URLs (and Words) 1999-2000 (Begun on August 25, 1999):

Dr. Charles F. Urbanowicz / Professor of Anthropology
Department of Anthropology / California State University, Chico
Chico, California 95929-0400
e-mail: curbanowicz@csuchico.edu
http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/
(530-898-6220; 530-898-6192; FAX: 530-898-6824)
Spring Semester 2000 [1]

[This page printed from http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/URLs&Words1999-2000.html]


For similar URLs from the 1998-1999 Academic Year (as part of a 1998-1999 CELT [Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching] grant, please see see the May 10, 1999 URL @ LPP (Learning Productivity Projects) MISCELLANEOUS as well as the May 11, 1999 "Final Report" located at 1998-1999 Learning Productivity Project Final Report.


On May 5, 2000, the FINAL items were added to these pages: 

Computers And Technology Into The Twenty-First Century: You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet (Again).
(For the City of Chico Fire Department Workshop, Chico, California, May 5, 2000.) 

Note: New search engine at: http://www.raging.com/

"When a group of individuals becomes a 'we,' a harmonious whole, then the highest is reached that humans as creatures can reach." Albert Einstein (1879-1955), as cited in The Wall Street Journal, April 18, 2000, page B3

Special - three articles from The San Francisco Chronicle of 25 April 2000:

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2000/04/25/MN63729.DTL [SF Chron 25 April 2000 Genetics]

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2000/04/25/MN74402.DTL [SF Chron 25 April 2000 Genetics]

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2000/04/25/MN70270.DTL [SF Chron 25 April 2000 Genetics]

"The paradox of efficiency means that as the web tightens it grows more vulnerable to small disturbances--disruptions and delays that can cascade through the system for days [or forever!]." James Gleick, 1999, Faster: The Acceleration of Just About Everything (NY: Pantheon Books), page 223.

"Tech Trends: DNA Computing High-speed processors are hardly news these days. One GHz? Yawn. The real cutting edge of technology is DNA computing. Scientists are putting DNA on chips and using genes to solve Math problems. In the near future, we may eliminate genetic diseases and, eventually, merge mind and machine." SEE: http://1.digital.cnet.com/cgi-bin1/flo?x=dAhKKmhKuowBYuhug


On April 17, 2000, the following items were added to these pages: 

http://www.zdnet.com/yil/content/college/ [America's Most Wired Colleges 2000; supposedly due on the WWW on 18 April 2000; but see Rob Bernstein, May 2000, America's 100 Most Wired Colleges 2000. Yahoo! Internet Life, pages 114-125.

http://www.pvhs.chico.k12.ca.us [Pleasant Valley high School, Chico, CA] and see:

http://www.education-world.com [Education World]

http://hum.amu.edu.pl/~zbzw/glob/glob1.htm [The Great Globe Gallery on the World Wide Web]

http://slarti.ucd.ie/int_maps.html [The World Maps]

http://www.cyberatlas.com [Internet Statistics]

http://www.internetstats.com [InternetStats - Trade Statistics]

http://www.strategisgroup.com [Analysis, Consulting, and Advising]

http://www.ed.gov/prog_info/SFA/StudentGuide/2000-1 [Comprehensive Resource on Student Financial Aid]

http://www.ncsu.edu/careerkey/career_key.html [The Career Key - Lengthy but somewhat interesting!]

http://highwire.stanford.edu/lists/freeart.dtl [Free Online Full-text Articles]

"Another myth of digital culture is that information presented in cyberspace is somehow more empirical than information filtered through traditional media hierarchies. In fact, the opposite is often the case. While there is no question that important and worthwhile discussions can and do take place, opinions in cyberspace are simply that, opinions. It costs very little, in the personal sense, to render an opinion, and there is no accountability structure in place that can allow comparison between the gravitas of more formal public discourse to a free-floating, shoot-from-the-hip forum like Usenet." Thomas S. Valovic, 2000, Digital Mythologies: The Hidden Complexities of the Internet (Rutgers University Press), page 111.

http://www.ikonic.com/ikonia/bbridge.asp [San Francisco Bay Bridge Camera]  

http://www.nps.gov/gosp [Golden Spike/Promontory point, Utah]

cyberatlas.guggenheim.org/intro/ca-f.html [Guggenheim Museum's Cyber Atlas] 

http://www.fmnh.org/ [Field Museum, Chicago]

http://www.sla.purdue.edu/people/soc/mdeflem/education.htm [Plagiarism on the web]

http://www.talkinghistory.org [Talking History]

and finally,

http://www.earthday.net [April 22 is "Earth Day"]


On March 28, 2000, the following items were added to these pages:

"I am a short-term pessimist but a long-term optimist." Arthur M. Schlesinger (1917-> ) as quoted in Tom Brokaw, 1998, The Greatest Generation (NY: Random House), page 369.

http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/LeadershipChicoMarch2000.htm [March 15, 2000} Urbanowicz on Technology]

http://www.cookiecentral.com/ [Cookie Central!]

http://www.junkbusters.com/ht/en/cookies.html [On "Cookies" & Privacy!]

http://www.tiac.net/users/smiths/privacy/wbfaq.htm [On "Web Bugs! & Privacy!!]

http://www.cdt.org/ [The Center for Democracy and Technology]

"A nod, a wink, a glimmer in the eye, the beveled edge of an intellectual's keen awareness, a friend or loved one's priceless gesture, a child's emotional shorthand for pain and disappointment--these are the true currency of human awareness. But awareness itself--that sense of the larger universe in which we collecitvely dwell--might inadvertently become a casualty of the electronic age." Thomas S. Valovic, 2000, Digital Mythologies: The Hidden Complexities of the Internet (Rutgers University Press), page 64.

"The Gigahertz Era has arrived. The newest PC microprocessors made by competitors AMD Corp. and Intel Corp. run at a blazing 1 gigahertz - a billion cycles a second - a speed that seemed unfathomable in the computer world a decade ago [1990]. ... Analysts expect Intel and Advanced Micro Devices to leapfrog one another in a speed war for the next few years, at least. Already, Intrel has announced plans to release a 1.5 GHz chip in the second half of this year [stress added]." Eric Young, 2000, Computer Chips Racing Towards Speed Barrier. The Sacramento Bee, Friday, March 17, page F1 & F3, page F1.

"A book is an information resource. It contains a text that may be useful in different ways. The text can now come to us in different forms, electronically, on disk, or on an audio tape, so does the bound stack of paper have any special place in the modern world? We may now have fully entered into an age where, for the first time in five hundred years, since the invention of printing with movable type, the book is no longer a primary means of communication. Yet it seems unlikely that the book will easily drop out of our lives, since it is not, after all, a neutral information resource like any other, but a cultural artifact with a variety of meanings accumulated over time [stress added]." Alan Powers, 1999, Living With Books (SOMA: San Francisco), page 6.
http://www.ncsu.edu/careerkey/career_key.html [The Career Key - Lengthy but somewhat interesting!]

http://216.191.18.200/internetstats/ [InternetStats - Trade Stats]

http://campus.northpark.edu/history/WebChron/index.html [WebChron = Web Chronology Project]

"A friendly warning.
Anyone who doesn't know how to operate a computer in the coming years will not be able to function in society.
Don't be intimidated.
The systems today are not only user friendly, they are idiot friendly, no offense intended."
David Baldacci, 1997, Total Control (NY: Warner Books), page 235.


On March 14, 2000, the following items were added to this page:

http://www.csuchico.edu/pub/inside/5.libraryatlarge.html [The Internet is for Book Lovers: With GREAT Links!]

http://www.metroactive.com/papers/metro/01.06.00/cover/humantech-0001.html [Silicon Humans} Article about San Jose State University Anthropologists Working in Silicon Valley]

"Intel Ships Fast Chip, Catches Up With AMD. Driven by their intensifying competition for bragging rights in PC processor speed, both Intel and Advanced Micro Devices this week began shipping 1-gigahertz chios, well ahead of their previously announced schedule. ... A gigahertz is 1,000 megahertz, or 1 billion cycles per second. The more cycles per second, the faster a microprocessor can chew through its assigned tasks. The actual speed users experience on real-life tasks, however, depends on a variety of factors, including other aspects of a chip's design, the performance of other PC components and, increasingly, the speed of the machine's Internet connection--not to mention the users typing and thinking speeds [stress added]." Henry Norr, 2000, San Francisco Chronicle, Thursday, March 9, page B1.

"WEB HAS MORE THAN A BILLION PAGES: The World Wide Web now contains more than one billion unique documents, according to Inktomi and the NEC Research Institute. Nearly 55 percent of URLs end in .com. The second most popular ending is .net, with 7.82 percent, followed by .edu with 6.69 percent, .org with 1.15 percent, .gov with 1.15 percent, and .mil with 0.17 percent. Most Web documents -- 86.55 percent -- are in English. For more information see http://www.inktomi.com/webmap (Nua Internet Surveys, 8 February 2000)

http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/8319/avidreader.html [The Avid Reader Web Ring]

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/srtm/ [Shuttle Radar Topography Mission/NASA]

http://www.star.le.ac.uk/edu/ [Leicester University Educational Guide to Space Astronomy]

http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/067/science/Science_fits_nicely_between_art_reality+.shtml [Science Fits Nicely Between Art+Reality]

http://www.newscientist.co.uk/news/news.jsp?id=ns222927 ["Nowhere To Hide"} On A Gene-Profiling System]

http://abcnews.go.com/sections/science/DailyNews/brainmapping000308.html [Scientists Map the Brains of Children]

http://unisci.com/stories/20001/0309003.htm [Ecology May Get Its Own Set of Natural Laws]

http://www.MuseumNetwork.com [Museum Network} 33,000 Museums Worldwide!]


On February 29, 2000, the following items were added to this page:

http://www.rinkworks.com/dialect/ [The Dialectizer]

http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_635000/635292.stm [Optimists Live Longer} from the BBC]

http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000225/hl/dsa_55.html [On Hopelessness and Hypertension]

http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct/gui/c/b [Clinical Trials} US National Institutes of Health]

http://www.centerwatch.com/main.htm [Clinical Trials} Centerwatch]

http://www.cert.org/ [Computer Emergency Response Team @ Carnegie Mellon University]

http://www.hackernews.com/ [Hacker News Network]

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ [Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology]

http://www.mesc.usgs.gov/butterfly/Butterfly.html [Butterflies!]

http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/1999/index.html [Hubble Space Telescope]

http://www.zdnet.com/yil/content/depts/netbuzz/ [Yahoo Internet Life! Daily Net Buzz] 

http://www.evoyage.com/Whatis.html [What is Evolutionary Psychology?]


On February 15, 2000, the following items were added to this page:

http://www.wanonline.com/blackhistory/1999/tl.html [African American Timeline]

http://www.ai.mit.edu/people/isbell/HFh/black/bhist.html [A Deeper Shade of History, includes "This Day in Black History']

http://www.afroam.org [Afro-America: The African American Newspapers Homepage]

http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/travel/civilrights [We Shall Overcome] 

http://www.privacychoices.org [About On-Line Advertising]

http://www.adsubtract.com [Subtract The Ads!]

www.asd.com [American School Directory - Your interactive Gateway to All 108,000 K-12 Schools]

http://web66.coled.umn.edu/schools/US/California.html [Web66: International School Web Registry - California]

http://web66.coled.umn.edu/ [Web66 Home Page]

http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/heri.html [Higher Education Research Institute} Including an "Executive Summary" of the 1999 Freshman Report and the 1998-1999 survey on how college faculty "feel" about Information Technology]

http://www.ed.gov/pubs/CollegeWeek/ [Getting There: A Report for National College Week, November 1999]

Darwin Videotapes at: http://mole.csuchico.edu:8080/ramgen/archive/darwinreflections.rm and http://mole.csuchico.edu:8080/ramgen/archive/darwinvoyage.rm and a "Darwin Self-Test" is at:

http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/SelfTesting/DarwinTestOne.htm   


On January 31, 2000, the following items were added to this page:

http://www.cde.ca.gov/psaa/ [California's Public Schools Accountability Act of 1999]

http://www.positivepress.org/saying [Positive Sayings of the Day!]

http://www.creativequotations.com/ [Quotations for Creative Thinking And Living]

http://www.sla.purdue.edu/people/soc/mdeflem/education.htm [Free Education Now: Concerning "Course Notes" on the WWW]

http://campus.northpark.edu/history/WebChron [World Chronology!]

http://www.voicenet.com/~bertland/cal.html [Calendars: A Guide To Locating....]

"Technologies acquire historical weight by reshaping the human condition. Gutenberg's press led to mass literacy, fostered the Proterstant Reformation (by undermining the clergy's theological monopoly) and, through the easy exchange of information, enabled the scientific revolution. In the 19th century railroads created a truly national American market that favored mass production and the consumer society." Robert J. Samuelson, 2000, The Internet And Gutenberg. Newsweek, January 24, 2000, page 45. 


On January 25, 2000, the following items were added to this page:

"We can be absolutely certain only about the things we do not understand." Eric Hoffer (1902-1983) as quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle, January 25, 2000, page A15.

"The environment was complex and rich; any two people could get together and exchange views, and even end up working together somehow. This system produced a weird and wonderful machine, which needed care to maintain, but could take advantage of the ingenuity, inspiration, and intuition of individuals in a special way. That, from the start, have been my goal for the World Wide Web. Hope in life comes from the interconnections among all the people in the world. We believe that if we all work for what we think is individually good, then we as a whole will achieve more power, more understanding, more harmony as we continue the journey. We don't find the individual being subjugated by the whole. We don't find the needs of the whole being subjugated by the increasing power of the individual. We might see more understanding in the struggles beyween these extremes. We don't expect the system to eventually become perfect. But we feel better and better about it. We find the journey more and more exciting, but we don't expect it to end. Should we then feel that we are getting smarter and smarter, and more and more in control of nature, as we evolve? Not really. Just better connected--connected into a better shape. The experience of seeing the Web take off by the grassroots efforts of thousands gives me tremendous hope that if we have the individual will, we can collectively make of our world what we want [stress added]." Tim Berners-Lee [with Mark Fischetti] (1999), Weaving The Web: The Original Design And Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web By Its Inventor (HarperSan Francisco), page 209.

http://www.w3.org/ [Always useful to "remember" and go to on various occasions]
"It's a cliche of the digital age: Parents wonder how children so helpless in the real world can navigate the virtual world with such skill. Using computers is second nature to most kids--and with good reason, according to many neurologists. Being exposed to the wired world at early ages is effectively wiring children's brains differently, giving them an ease and comfort with computers that adults may never match. Will the new millennium see the generation gap turn into the digital divide? ... The cognitive gap is likely to continue well into the future, even as today's cyberkids become tomorrow's parents. While kids are growing up with brains well suited to the digital world of today, as adults they are likely to face the difficult task of adapting to a future where technology evolves even more rapidly--and more profoundly--than it does today [stress added]." Yocki J. Dreazen & Rachel Emma Silverman, 2000, Raised In Cyberspace. January 1, 2000, The Wall Street Journal, page R47.

"The World Wide Web, long the province of men seeking techno-gadgets, sports scores and pornography, now is drawing a nearly equal share of women users. An estimated 49 percent [~34,000,000] of Web users at the end of 1999 were women and it's forecast they will be in the majority within the next 12 months, according to a recent survey by AdRelevance, a Seattle-area research group. That marks a huge jump from just four years ago, when women accounted for just 35 percent of Internet users" [stress added]. Clint Stewart, 2000, Web Losing Gender Gap: Men Soon Online Minority. The Sacramento Bee, January 22, page 1 and page 20, page 1.

http://www.ceoexpress.com/ [Information sources]

"In a development that could help telecommunications companies keep up with the flood of Interent traffic, TRW Space & Electronics Group said it has created a telecommunications chip that can operate at a blazing 69 gigahertz. At that speed, the chip can transfer data through a fiber-optic network at 40 gigabits a second, or the equivalent of 10 software comapct disks in one second. ... it is expected to begin shipping world-wide next year [in 2000]. ... the fastest [current] silicon chip from Intel Corp. runs at 733 megahertz, or almost 100 times slower than the TRW chip, which operates at 69,000 megahertz [stress added." Deank Takahashi, 1999, TRW to Make Chip to Speed Web-Data Flow. The Wall Street Journal, December 8, 1999.

"Make sure your employees [or students!] are learning something every day. Ideally, they should learn things that directly help on the job, but learning anything at all should be encouraged. The more you know, the more connections form in your brain, and the easier every task becomes. Learning creates job satisfaction and supports a person's ego and energy level [stress added]" Scott Adams, 1996, The Dilbert™ Principle: A Cubicle's-Eye View Of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions, page 322. 

"A computer will not make a good manager out of a bad manager. It makes a good manager better faster and a bad manager worse faster." (Edward M. Esber)

"With human activity coalescing and quickening, the pace of social change is accelerating. Where is this leading? One thing is virtually certain: the future is going to be far stranger than is generally imagined. ... Cultures that try to preserve their cherished traditions by blocking out the rapidly changing world cannot long succeed [stress added]." Gregory Stock, 1993, Metaman: The Merging of Humans and Machines into a Global Superorganism (NY: Simon & Schuster), pages 29-30 and page 239. 

http://www.popsci.com/features/bown/bown99 [Popular Science: 100 of 1999]
"Cookies are text files that a Web site places on your hard disk. They are a tool for personalizing your access and your path through a Web site. At their most innocent, cookies can help you more than they help the Web-site operator, by storing log-in information and preference information you've established so you see the site in the way you prefer, and get to key information quickly. However, cookies can also be used by Web-site operators to track your behavior, target ads at you, and otherwise establish a profile you never agreed to establish. Both Netscape Navigator and Microsoft Internet Explorer allow you to block all cookies." Walter S. Mosberg, The Wall Street Journal, December 23, 1999, page B8. 

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." (Clarke's Third Law in Profiles of the Future: An Inquiry into the Limits of the Possible by Arthur C. Clarke, 1984, page 26)  


Over the period from August 25, 1999 to December 6, 1999, a total of 119 items were placed on these pages.

Of the Fall 1999 items below, Charlie's DOZEN Favorites are:

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? we must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be attained." Marie Curie (1867-1934) [born Manya Sklodowska], two-time Nobel Prize Winner (Physics in 1903 and Chemistry in 1911), as cited in Madam Curie (1937) by Eve Curie (NY: Doubleday), page 166. [December 6, 1999]

"Follow in the footsteps of your ancestors for the mind is trained through knowledge. Behold, their words endure in books. Open and read them and follow their wise counsel." Ptah Hotep, c. 2340B.C. As cited in Dorothy Winbush Riley [Editor], 1993, My Soul Looks Back, 'Less I Forget: A Collection of Quotations By People of Color (NY: Harper Collins), page 17. [December 6, 1999]
"With the exponential force of its own big bang, cyberspace is exploding into being before our very eyes. Just as cosmologists tell us that the physical space of our universe burst into being out of nothing some fifteen billion years ago, so also the ontology of cyberspace is ex nihilo. We are witnessing here the birth of a new domain, a new space that simply did not exist before. The interconnected 'space' of the global computer network is not expanding into any previously existing domain; we have here a digital version of Hubble's cosmic expansion, a process of space creation [stress added]." Margaret Wertheim, 1999, The Pearly Gates of Cyberspace: A History of Space From Dante To The Internet (NY: W.W. Norton & Co.), page 223. [November 29, 1999]
"There is no reason to think the human race is exempt from the laws of nature." Richard Preston, 1999, What Things Are Going To Kill Me? Time, November 8, 1999, pages 86-87, page 87. [November 8, 1999]
http://www.hungersite.com/ [The Hunger Site Home]: "Helping the Hungry Is a Click Away. Computer programmer John Breen has made it easier to lend a hand: a single click at his Web site (hungersite.com) sends a single serving of food to a starving person. And it's at no cost to you; seven sponsors are making the donations to the United Nations World Food Program in return for advertising links at the site. Breen esitmates that 4 million helpings of food have been served since the service's launch last summer, You're limited to one click per day, so boomark the site and make your mark." (Anon., 1999, Newsweek, November 8, page 18). [November 8, 1999]
"Any teacher who can be replaced by a computer deserves to be!" (David Smith; as cited by Mike Cooley, 1999, Human-Centered Design. In Information Design (1999), edited by Robert Jacobson (MIT Press), pages 59-81, page 73. [October 25, 1999]
"The faculty of a great university is composed of men and women who think otherwise." David Saxon, San Francisco Chronicle,October 9, 1999, page A18. [October 11, 1999]

"One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important." Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) [October 11, 1999]

http://www.dol.gov/dol/asp/public/futurework/report.htm [Department of Labor: Trends and Challenges for Work in the 21st Century] [October 4, 1999]

"September 1989 [Yes: 1989, not an error in typing - ten years ago this month.] Weighty matters. Apple launches its first laptop computer, the Macintosh Portable. The machine, comparable in size to a portable typewriter, weighs in at 16 lbs. and retails for $6,500." (Anon., Time Digital, September 6, 1999, page 17; and see http://www.timedigital.com) [September 8, 1999]

http://cuda.teleeducation.nb.ca/nosignificantdifference/ = [Now 355 Research Reports: 1928-1999; the "No Significant Difference Phenomenon] "This site is a compilation of 218 research reports from 1945 to 1995 that compared instruction with and without technology and found no significant differences. These findings span a range of technologies, methodologies, and settings." (Michael L. Kamil and Diane M. Lane, 1998, Researching the Relation Between Technology and Literacy: An Agenda for the 21st Century. In Handbook of Literacy and Technology: Transformations in a Post-Typographic World, edited by David Reinking et al., 1998, pages 323-341, page 331.) [August 25, 1999] 

"You have to work with all kinds of people, and you have to take them for what they are, not for what you'd prefer them to be." (The character Marlene Ciampi Karp in Robert K. Tannebaum, 1998, Reckless Endangerment, page 82.) [August 25, 1999]
 

On December 6, 1999, the following items were added to this page:

"We may not know where we're clicking all the time, but researchers are getting good at predicting where we're likely to go next. Modern man's [and woman's!] patterns of what researchers call information foraging turn out to be just as habitual as his [or her!!] ancestors': he [!] follows the scent, hunts in packs and returns to familiar ground as often as possible. 'You can apply behavioral models of how animals forage for food,' says PARC [Palo Alto Research Center] e-cologist James Pitkow, 'and it transfers remarkably well [all stress added!].'" Chris Taylor, 1999, Inside The Geekosystem. Time Digital, 29 November 1999, pages 40-44, page 42 [see http://www.timedigital.com]

http://www.y2k.gov [President's Council on Year 2000 Conversion]

http://www.y2k.gov [Hotline]

http://www.year2000.com/y2karticles.html [Daily Y2K news} since 1996]

http://www.altfutures.com [Institute for Alternative Futures]

http://www.wfs/org [World Future Society]

http://www.soc.hawaii.edu/futures [Hawai'i Research Center for Futures Studies]

http://www.foresight.org [Foresight Institute]

http://www.hudson.org [Hudson Institute]

"Follow in the footsteps of your ancestors for the mind is trained through knowledge. Behold, their words endure in books. Open and read thgem and follow their wise coounsel." Ptah Hotep, c. 2340B.C. As cited in Dorothy Winbush Riley [Editor], 1993, My Soul Looks Back, 'Less I Forget: A Collection of Quotations By People of Color (NY: Harper Collins), page 17.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? we must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be attained." Marie Curie (1867-1934) [born Manya Sklodowska], two-time Nobel Prize Winner (Physics in 1903 and Chemistry in 1911), as cited in Madam Curie (1937) by Eve Curie (NY: Doubleday), page 166.

On November 29, 1999, the following items were added to this page:

"With the exponential force of its own big bang, cyberspace is exploding into being before our very eyes. Just as cosmologists tell us that the physical space of our universe burst into being out of nothing some fifteen billion years ago, so also the ontology of cyberspace is ex nihilo. We are witnessing here the birth of a new domain, a new space that simply did not exist before. The interconnected 'space' of the global computer network is not expanding into any previously existing domain; we have here a digital version of Hubble's cosmic expansion, a process of space creation [stress added]." Margaret Wertheim, 1999, The Pearly Gates of Cyberspace: A History of Space From Dante To The Internet (NY: W.W. Norton & Co.), page 223.

"The net is so vast and is growing so rapidly that each person's experience with it can only be a tiny sample of the whole. This is one reason it is so enchanting: you just never know what you will find when you click the mouse and explore a new location. It may also contribute to the diversity of opinions about the net's value in our lives and to society in general. Each of us partakes of different Internet niches, and out experiences can leave us with markedly different views." Patricia Wallace, 1999, The Psychology of the Internet (Cambridge University Press), page 233.
http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea2020/ [San Francisco Bay Area in the Year 2020]

http://www.ppic.org [Public Policy Institute "Valley" Report]

http://www.lehigh.edu/~injrl/news/newspap.html [Newspapers on-line]

http://www.newsdirectory.com/ [Newspapers and Media]

HTTP://PTECH.WSJ.COM/ [Personal Technology from The Wall Street Journal]

http://www.zdevents.com/comdex/ [COMDEX 1999]

http://www.mit.edu:8001/people/cdemello/univ.html [College and University Home Pages]

http://www.quotations.co.uk/ [Quotez: More Than 13,500 Quotations]

http://www.math.temple.edu/~cow/ [Calculus on the Web]

http://www.dlib.indiana.edu/collections/hoagy [Hoagy Carmichael]


On November 8, 1999, the following items were added to this page:

"There is no reason to think the human race is exempt from the laws of nature." Richard Preston, 1999, What Things Are Going To Kill Me? Time, November 8, 1999, pages 86-87, page 87.

http://www.hungersite.com/ [The Hunger Site Home]: "Helping the Hungry Is a Click Away. Computer programmer John Breen has made it easier to lend a hand: a single click at his Web site (hungersite.com) sends a single serving of food to a starving person. And it's at no cost to you; seven sponsors are making the donations to the United Nations World Food Program in return for advertising links at the site. Breen esitmates that 4 million helpings of food have been served since the service's launch last summer, You're limited to one click per day, so boomark the site and make your mark." (Anon., 1999, Newsweek, November 8, page 18)

"Should You Worry About Health Risks From Biotech Food? Better eating through biotechnology conjures up a cornucopia of firm tomatoes, rosy radicchio and enriched rice. But some consumer groups are raising questions about the health risks of eating genetically modified foods. The potential for unpredictable allergic reactions is the most immediate issue. Harder to quantify is the risk that new genes could spread beyond their target group into people or into microbes, giving old germs new virulence [stress added]." Marilyn Chase, 1999, The Wall Street Journal, November 5, 1999, page B1). 

"...the weakest of all weak things is a virtue which has not been tested in the fire." Samuel Clemens [also known as "Mark Twain], "The Man That Corrupted Hadleburg" in The Complete Short Stories of Mark Twain (1957), edited by Charles Neider (Garden City, NY/Doubleday), pages 349-350. [as cited in Brenda Murphy, 1999, Congressional Theatre: Dramatizing McCarthyism on Stage, Film, And Television (Cambridge University Press), pages 256-257)

http://plagiarism.org/ [Plagiarism.org]

"It should be our pride to teach ourselves as well as we can always to speak as simply and clearly and unpretentiously as possible, and to avoid like the plague the appearance of possessing knowledge which is too deep to be clearly and simply expressed." Sir Karl Popper [1902-1994], as quoted in Robert A. Day, 1995, Scientific English: A Guide For Scientists and Other Professionals, page ix.

http://usvms.gpo.gov/ [United States of America v. Microsoft Corporation, C.A. 98-1232]

"It is impossible to dissociate language from science or science from language, because every natural science always involves three things: the sequence of phenomena on which the science is based; the abstract concepts which call these phenomena to mind; and the words in which the concepts are expressed. To call forth a concept a word is needed; to portray a phenomenon, a concept is needed. All three mirror one and the same reality." Antoine Laurent Lavoisier (1743-1794), as quoted in Robert A. Day, 1995, Scientific English: A Guide For Scientists and Other Professionals, page 1; from Traite Elémentaire de Chimie (1789) as cited in Familar Quotations....by John Bartlett (16th edition) Edited by Justin Kaplan (1992), page 345.

http://www.jonesinternational.edu/ [Jones International University, The University of the Web: "First Accredited Cyber University"]

http://www.netlibrary.com [Netlibrary]

http://www.gutenberg.net [Michael Hart's "Project Gutenberg"]

http://www.pcwebopedia.com [Online Computer Dictionary]

http://www.perceptualrobotics.com/live [Cyberspace Camera]

http://www.pancanal.com/photo/camera-java.html [Panama Canal Camera]

http://www.kremlinkam.com [Kremlinkam]

http://www.camcity.com [Web Cam Directory] 

http://www.uselessknowledge.com/random.shtml [Random Factoid!]

http://www.iy2kcc.org/CountryWeb.htm [International Y2K Cooperation Center]

"If I don't practice for one day, I know it; if I don't practise for two days, the critics know it; if I don't practice for three days, the audience knows it." Ignace Jan Padarewski (1860-1941)

"Theatre is a made thing, an artifice highly wrought. It is not prey to the spontaneous or the haphazard irrationality of real life. Through theatre we explore the instability of every circumstance. Theatre is a highly collaborative art which requires much of everyone and is full of risk. The art of theatre contributes to our understanding of the greatest art of all--the art of living [stress added]." Annie Castledine, 1999, On Directing: Interviews With Directors (Edited by Gabriella Giannachi and Mary Luckhurst, pages 7-12, page 7.

"The fact that a group of people are willing to meet at the same time in the same place on the understanding that they all want to share in an imaginary process is always an extraordinary thing to me. At its worst it is empty routine, but at its best theatre is a transcendent experience [stress added]." Garry Hynes, 1999, On Directing: Interviews With Directors (Edited by Gabriella Giannachi and Mary Luckhurst, pages 50-54, page 52.


On October 25, 1999, the following items were added to this page:
"Any teacher who can be replaced by a computer deserves to be!" (David Smith; as cited by Mike Cooley, 1999, Human-Centered Design. In Information Design (1999), edited by Robert Jacobson (MIT Press), pages 59-81, page 73.

"CUSTOMERS RULE. The word from the Silicon frontier is that you can kiss your five-year plan goodbye. Or, for that matter, any plan that ends in -year. And that goes for the Rust Belt, too. Some companies are writing and rewriting strategy every quarter, or even every week--or else. 'It used to be that the big ate the small,' says Geoff Yang, a partner in the Menlo Park, Calif., venture-capital firm IVP/Redpoint Ventures. 'Now the fast eat the slow.' The impact on planning is revolutionary. Net-speeds force all sorts of cultural changes [stress added!]." Marcia Stepanek, 1999, How fast Is Net Fast? Business Week E.Biz, November 1, 1999, pages EB52-EB53, page EB52.

"Intel Corp. on Monday [October 25, 1999] is expected to introduce a battery of new chips that should allow the company to retake the speed crown from rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc. ... the new [Intel] chips operate at a speed of 733 megaherz, up from the 600 megaherz of Intel's current high-end chips. [PLEASE NOTE: AMD's current Athlon chip "only" operates at 700 megaherz; also, Intel's new chip will be 106 square millimeters in size while AMD's present chip is 184 square millimeters. URBANOWICZ ADDS, NOW, since 10 millimeters equals 1 centimeter in length and 1 centimeter equals .3937 inches and 106 square millimeters is an object 10.29 millimeters by 10.29 millimeters millimeters or slightly more than .3937 inches-by.3977 inches, then this new Intel chip is FAST and small!] [stress added]." Dean Takahashi, 1999, Intel To Unveil Speedier Chips On Monday. The Wall Street Journal, Friday, October 22, 1999, page B6)

"...ultrasmall approach to computer memory, being developed at the IBM Research Div. in Zurich, can pack a 3-by-3 millimeter square--the size of an 'm' on this page--with a gigabyte of data, or 1 billion letters and numbers. That's 20 times the amount that can be stored magnetically in the same space. ... Gigabyte memories are just for starters, says [Kurt K.] Binning. IBM already has a Millipede prototype that can store 1,000 times more--a terrabyte of data [stress added]." (Otis Port, 1999, An Elephant's Memory In A Tiny Space. Business Week, October 25, 1999, page 95.)

"Researchers at Northwestern university announced in the October 15 [1999] issue of Science that they have invented the world's smallest and most accurate plotter. Their so-called nanoplotter is capable of drawing miniscule lines--each is only about 30 molecules wide--with such precision that only 200 billionths of an inch separates them. If the technology can be commercialized, it might be used to pack more processing power onto a computer chip, boosting speed and performance. It could also lead to diagnostic devices that can load thousands of medical sensors onto an area smaller than the head of a pin [stress added]." Anon., 1999, Business Week, November 1, 1999, page 84.

"And yet this school, like every other school, is changing fast, by accident and design, because everything that touches it is changing too--the economy, family life, technology, race relations, values, expectations." Nancy Gibbs, 1999, A Week In The Life Of A High School. Special Report in Time, October 25, 1999, pages 67-70, page 68.

"In the end, a society gets the children it deserves. An American society that has, essentially, decided to let kids raise themselves gets an MTV and Gap generation. Geoffrey Norman, 1999, reviewing Kay S. Hymnowitz's Ready Or Not (1999); in The Wall Street Journal, October 20, 1999, page A24.
http://www.amnh.org/naturalhistory [The American museum of Natural History, New York City]

http://www.currents.net/resources/dictionary/dictionary.phtml [High Tech Dictionary]

http://www.msg.net/kadow/answers/ [Internet & Unix Dictionary]

http://www2.widener.edu/Wolfgram-Memorial-Library/webeval.htm [Evaluating Web Resources]

http://www.ex.ac.uk/cimt/dictunit/dictunit.htm [Dictionary of Units]

http://www.abcnews.go.com/century/feature/tcof_internet_102199.html [ABC News on the Internet]

"The fastest way to succeed is to double your failure rate." (Thomas J. Watson, Sr., founder of IBM)


On October 11, 1999, the following items were added to this page:

"The faculty of a great university is composed of men and women who think otherwise." David Saxon, San Francisco Chronicle,October 9, 1999, page A18.

"One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important." Bertrand Russell (1872-1970)

http://www.odci.gov/cia/publications/factbook/index.html [1999 CIA Factbook]

http://learning.turner.com/cnn/ [Millennium TV Series]

http://www.biography.com [Biography TV Series]

http://www.patents.ibm.com/gallery [Gallery of Obscure Patents]

http://www.positivepress.org/saying [Positive Sayings of the Day!]

Some interesting "Web Image" Search Engines are:

http://image.altavista.com/cgi-bin/avncgi [AltaVista], and http://ipix.yahoo.com [Yahoo]


On October 4, 1999, the following items were added to this page:

http://www.dol.gov/dol/asp/public/futurework/report.htm [Department of Labor: Trends and Challenges for Work in the 21st Century]

"A home without a library lacks diversity of voices, opinions and world views. When you read a book, you enter another person's perspective. And because a reader can put the book down and think about what the author has said, a good reader enters a dialogue with the authopr or the characters created by the author. One can reread passages and linger over thoughts or ideas or savor the deliciousness of the language. Television, even at its best, lacks diversity and the ability of a viewer to carry on an inner dialogue with the speakers or the authors of the program. Books encourage thinking. A reader must create images from the words the author has supplied, must imagine the events described, must track the plot or the logic of the writer and must visualize the main characters in the mind's eye. The book is in your hands. You can return to passages if there is something you don't understand. You can argue with the author in your head; you can nod in agreement. You learn, unconsciously, the way words can fit together--sometimes so well that they seem inevitable and irresistible [stress added]." Charles Levendosky, 1999, Read a banned book, give one to your children. The Sacramento Bee, October 2, 1999, page B7)

http://lcweb.loc.gov/loc/lcib/9907/frontiers.html [Frontiers of the Mind, Part 1]

http://www.meijergardens.org [Leonardo Da Vinci's Horse!]

http://www.hyperhistory.com [World history]

http://www.searchenginecolossus.com [Search Engine Collosus]


On September 27, 1999, the following items were added to this page:

http://www-new.csuchico.edu/lins/lib_workshops.shtml [Meriam Library Workshops Fall 1999]

http://www2.bluemountain.com/index.html [Electronic Greeting Cards!]

http://www.senate.gov/~y2k/ [On Y2K!]

http://home.cnet.com/category/topic/0,10000,0-3805-7-273927,00.html [The Decade in Computing]

http://www.bev.net [Blacksburg Electronic Village]

http://www.slashdot.org [Technology News]

http://www.darwinawards.com [The Darwin Awards: "Commemorating those who have doused our gene pool with chlorine." USAToday, September 22, 1999, page 8D]

http://www.studyweb.com [A "learning portal"]


On September 21, 1999, the following items were added to this page:

"Teachers Are Lagging Behind in Logging On. With more computers than ever ready to be booted up in classrooms across the country, our schools should be turning out thousands of Bill Gates clones. Not so fast. It seems half the screens are dark because the geeks who backed this rush to get computers in schools forgot one key element--training the teachers. Education Week magazine has just completed a comprehensive report on technology in schools that shows teachers don't know what to do with all that RAM. Almost 50% don't use computers at all in teaching, and only 61% percent [that's the way it appears in Time magazine folks!!] use the Internet. And the educational software that's out there doesn't provide much promise: 71% of high school teachers said finding useful products is nearly impossible, and the software-savvy give materials that are usable a grade C or lower.--By Sally B. Connelly/Washington [stress added]." Time, September 27, 1999, page 26.

Suppose you bought a car, and one day it suddenly refused to shift into reverse and flashed a dashboard message like this: 'Fatal error. Cannot perform that function with the current version of this vehicle. You kmust upgrade to Microsoft Transmission 99.' If cars worked like that, there would be Senate hearings, massive lawsuits and blistering cover stories in Consumer Reports. But personal computers pull that sort of thing all the time. In fact, unless you bought a really, really bad car, it's probable that your PC is the least reliable, most frustrating, major device you own. Windows PCs are the worst, but even Apple Computer's supposedly simple iMac requires more care, feeding and problem-solving than any $1,200 gadget should. Incredibly, a full 22 years after the introduction of the first mass-market PC, these machines fail to work as promised day after day, and force their users to spend hours solving baffling defects you would think some millionaire programmer should have caught [stress added]." Walter J. Mossberg, The Wall Street Journal, September 17, 1999, page W1.
"Superfast semiconductors no larger than bacteria. Miniscule computers woven into your clothes. These wonders will be commonplace when science learns to manipulate tiny cylinders of carbon known as nanotubes." (Irene M. Kunti, 1999, Business Week, September 27, 1999, page 139)

"Three hundred years after Jonathan Swift [1667-1745], in one of his most inventive essays, first described a heroic struggle between angry and competing volumes of literature deep in the bowels of the St. James Library, today we have a Battle of the Books breaking out again. ... the archvillain of the new, the ultimate godfather of a massive and newly published Encarta Dictionary of World English, is Microsoft's Bill Gates. ... [who wants us] to buy his new books, to learn and speak his new language, and to try to forget that what we spoke before every truly existed, or ever was contained in such dictionaries as we used in the bad old days. ... Is this really English we are being offered? Or is it the beginning, the beta version, the build 1.0 of an Orwellian newspeak--which may probably be doubleplusgood in its own way, but nonetheless a language more suited to be uttered over a glass of Victory Gin, whle we listen to the crackling Disney telescreen with its news of defeats of other brave new worlds who speak alien tongues, like old English or old German or Yiddish or Masai, and who behave in ways that Mr. Gates and his chums could not countenance?" Simon Winchester [author of The Professor and the Madman], 1999, Dueling Dictionaries. The Wall Street Journal, September 17, 1999, Editorial Page, page A14.

http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/college/corank.htm [2000 Colleges Ranking]

http://www.roadsideamerica.com [Offbeat Tourist Attractions!

http://www.hartscientific.com/y2k.htm [Unofficial Y2K page!]

http://www.interface-analysis.com/ergoworld [Entrance to numerous Ergonomic sites]

http://www.osha-sic.gov/SLTC/ergonomics/index.html [OSHA & Ergonomics]

http://www.splcenter.org/ [Southern Poverty Law Center]   


On September 8, 1999, the following items were added to this page:

"September 1989 [Yes: 1989, not an error in typing - ten years ago this month.] Weighty matters. Apple launches its first laptop computer, the Macintosh Portable. The machine, comparable in size to a portable typewriter, weighs in at 16 lbs. and retails for $6,500." (Anon., Time Digital, September 6, 1999, page 17; and see http://www.timedigital.com)

"CAMPUSES TURN gray as college faculties get older. A faculty survey at 378 colleges and universities found that nearly one-third of fiull-time faculty members were at5 least 55 years olfd last fall, compared with about one-fourth a decade ago. The general population is agining, and under a 1994 federal law, colleges are banned from setting a mandatory retirement age for the faculty. The survey, released last month by the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California Los Angeles, also found that older professors were stressed more by information technology. Linda J. Sax, associate director at the institute, said the finding was significant because today's students are accustomed to using technology in instruction and research. But law professor Robert P. Mosteller, chairman of Duke University's academic council, wanrs against making generalizations based on the study. 'The key is that people need to stay as long as they are doing work that is good. So age is only a rough proxy,' Prof. Mosteller says [stress added]." [Anon., 1999, The Wall Street Journal, September 7, 1999, page 1.]

"Governors' 'virtual university' is virtually empty. By Robert Gehrke, Associate Press Writer. SALT LAKE CITY -- When Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt officially opened the Western Governors University a year ago, he heralded it as the 'higher education institution for the next millennium.' Thousands would be enrolled in a few years, predicted Leavitt, a cofounder of the institution, hundreds of thousands within a decade. But after one year with an operating budget and startup costs totalling $13 million, reality is nowhere near to approaching Leavitt's rapture. Since it opened a year ago, between 115 and 120 students have enrolled in slightly fewer than 130 courses offered by universities affiliated with WGU." Chico Enterprise-Record, September 5, 1999, page 6B)

http://www.sjsu.edu/depts/anthropology/svcp/ [The Silicon Valley Cultures Project]

http://www.keepyourbrainalive.com ["Neurobic" exercises!]

http://www.artchive.com [The Artchive: Images]

Some interesting "Web Image" Search Engines are:

http://www.ditto.com [Ditto], and http:www.scour.net [Scour]

http://www.earthcam.com [Directory of Webcams]

http://ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/(Gh)/guides/mtr/hurr/home/xrml [University of Illinois: Hurricanes!]

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov [National Hurricane Center]

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/~nantiq/archart.html [National Museum of Wales: "Stone Age Hunters" of Europe]

"Who invented the telephone? Microsoft Corp's Encarta multimedia encyclopedia on CD-ROM has an answer to that simple question. Rather, two answers. Consult the U.S., U.K., or German editions of Encarta and you find the expected one: Alexander Graham Bell. But look at the Italian version and the story is strikingly different. Credit goes to Antonio Meucci, an impoverished Italian-American candlemaker who, as the Italian-language Encarta tells it, beat Bell to the punch by five years. Who's right? Depends on where you live. ... in the age of the Internet, the issue of adapting products to local markets is raising trickier problems. Technology and globalization are colliding head-on with another powerful force: history. Perhaps nowhere is this conflict more apparent than in information as with Microsoft's Encarta, which has nine different editions, including one in British English and one in American. It's Microsoft's peculiar accomplishment that it has so mastered the adaptation of its products to different markets that they reflect different, sometimes contradictory, understandings of the same historical events. 'You basically have to rewrite all of the content,' says Dominique Lempereur, who, from her Paris office, oversees the expansion of Microsoft's education-related products to foreign markets. 'The translation is almost an accessory.' ... Consistency is clearly not Encarta's goal, and that's something of a controversial strategy. Encyclopedia Britannica, for example, has a policy of investigating contradictions across its editions and deciding on a standard presentation. Where it can establish a fact that is internationally solid, 'we go with that, and present other interpretations as need be,' says Dale Holberg, Britannica's editor in Chicago. His staff has looked into the Meucci question. Their verdict: Bell still gets the credit, world-wide, for inventing and patenting the electric telephone. ... Microsoft, as a technology conglomerate, has an interest in not stirring up controversies that endanger the sale of its other products. But the universality of the Web also frustrates efforts to localize content. And there remains the possibility that it will bring about pressure for one universally aplicable version of history. Perhaps one day Mr. Meucci will share space with Alexander Graham Bell in all of the Encartas [stress added]." (Kevin J. Delaney, 1999, Microsoft's Encarta Has Different Facts For Different Folks. The Wall Street Journal, June 25, 1999, page 1 & A11).


On August 25, 1999, the following items were added to this page:

"The eye is blind if the mind is absent." (Italian Proverb)

"You have to work with all kinds of people, and you have to take them for what they are, not for what you'd prefer them to be." (The character Marlene Ciampi Karp in Robert K. Tannebaum, 1998, Reckless Endangerment, page 82.)

"The average person now changes jobs 8.6 times between the ages of 18 and 32, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Such upheavals in the labor market have forced colleges to adapt....[stress added]." (Emily Bazar, 1999, Number of Students Over 40 Soaring At College Campuses. The Sacramento Bee, August 24, 1999, pages 1 and page A10, page 1.

"Nothing was ever invented, however, which did not bring some immediate--if temporary--misery to some, though it might eventually be a blessing to all." Brian Bailey, 1998, The Luddite Rebellion, page 3.

"Smallest computer yet is the size of an aspirin. The latest from cyberworld: an aspirin-sized computer that, embedded in household appliances, could let people on the road or at their office use the Internet to cool their homes, heat coffee and tape TV shows. Believed to be the smallest such computer ever built, the inexpensive device could help usher in a new generation of connected home appliances.... The tiny computer, slightly larger than the head of a match, is connected to the Internet from Shrikumar's apartment near the university [University of massachusetts in Amherst]. It includes a tiny 4-megaherz processor he bought for 49 cents and a small 32-kilobyte memory chip that stores World Wide Web pages and other data. Although these numbers are paltry compared to the speed and storage of modern personal computers, which run thousands of times faster and contain hundreds of times more storage, the tiny computer still is more powerful than typical computers less than a decade ago. Shrikumar, 33, said his computer can be built for less than $1, making it practical to install the devices in a variety of home electronics and appliances. .. Shrikumar's Internet computer is smaller than one built earlier this year at Stanford University, which includes a much more powerful processor and lots more memory. But the Stanford computer costs more than $800" [stress added]." (Anon., Chico Enterprise-Record, August 15, 1999, page 4A).

"We tend to think of technology as a set of tools to perform a specific function. These tools are often portrayed as mechanistic, exterior, autonomous, and concrete devices that accomplish tasks and create products. We do not generally think of them as intimately entwined with social and biological lives. But literacy technologies, such as pen and paper, index cards, computer databases, word processors, networks, e-mail, and hypertext, are also ideological tools; they are designed, accessed, interpreted, and used to further purposes that embody social values. More than mechanistic, they are organic, because they merge with our social, physical, and psychological beings. Thus, we need to look more closely at how technologies are realized in given settings. We may find that technological tools can be so embedded in the living process that their status as technologies disappears [stress added]." (Bertram C. Bruce and Maureen P. Hogan, 1998, The Dissapearance of technology: Toward and Ecological Model of Literacy. In Handbook of Literacy and Technology: Transformations in a Post-Typographic World, edited by David Reinking et al., 1998, pages 269-281, page 270.)

"Reading for pleasure may sound like an oxymoron to someone assigned a weekend of three chapters on diseases of the prostrate and 60 pages on the joys of the hypotenuse. But someday school books will fade away, the good books will still be there, and you'll want to read them. Besides the shops peddling pricey new editions--Tower, Readmore, Barnes & Noble, Waldenbooks--Chico offers the treasure trove of The Bookstore, on Main next to The Upper Crust (great Danish), where the dedicated searcher may unearth armloads of pre-owned printed wonderments. Supply refreshed each week via Ron's meticulous sifting of tomes tucked away in the Bay Area." (Anon., 1999, Entertainment A to Z. The Chico News & Review, August 12, 1999, "Goin' Chico'99" section, pages 39-45, page 44.)

http://cuda.teleeducation.nb.ca/nosignificantdifference/ = [Now 355 Research Reports: 1928-1999; the "No Significant Difference Phenomenon]

"This site is a compilation of 218 research reports from 1945 to 1995 that compared instruction with and without technology and found no significant differences. These findings span a range of technologies, methodologies, and settings." (Michael L. Kamil and Diane M. Lane, 1998, Researching the Relation Between Technology and Literacy: An Agenda for the 21st Century. In Handbook of Literacy and Technology: Transformations in a Post-Typographic World, edited by David Reinking et al., 1998, pages 323-341, page 331.) 

"It's official: Younger people are having a big impact on the Internet's customs and values. Forrester Research, the Cambridge, Mass. outfit that cranks out studies on how the Net is changing the world, revealed in its latest report yesterday that nearly 10 percent of the U.S. population is now aged between 16 and 22, and about half are online. ... The crux is that while older Americans have made the Internet a part of established routines, plucky youngsters have 'internalized' information technology and made it an intrinsic part of their lives. ...Forrester said it reached its conclusions after interviewing almost 8,500 16-to-22 year-olds throughout the country. Not everyone, however, accepts these findings as authoritative. Ann Wrixon, president of San Francisco's SeniorNet, an association of 30,000 computer-using adults ages 50 and older, was quick to observe that the number of senior citizens online easily matches the numer of teens. As of last year, she said 13 million older folks were wired. 'That number is at least 16 million now,' she said [stress added]." (David Lazarun, August 12, 1999, The Young's Big Effect on Internet. The San Franciso Chronicle, page B3.)

"The Y2K Social Disease....This virus of overconnectedness is spreading daily, and it has no known cure. ... It is not surprising that overconnectedness is the disease of the Internet age. Because as the Internet and globalization shrink both time and distance, it's great for business, but it's becoming socially claustrophobic. Time and distance provide buffers and when you eliminate both you eliminate some very important cushions. ... Out is over. Now, you're always in. And when you're always in, you're always on, you're just like a computer server. You can never stop and relax [stress added.]" (Thomas L. Friedman, August 12, 1999, The Y2K Social Disease. The San Franciso Chronicle, page A29.)

"As humans, we're tempted to embrace a likely scenario and stick to it. But in these volotile times, the smart idea is to pursue multiple paths and not be afraid to change direction." AND "Smart managers acknowledge their own myopia. They pursue several paths at once, knowing that some won't pay off. They fund research projects aimed at exploiting mutually exclusive visions of the future. They're willing to be wrong frequently, and quit when they're behind. The more unsettled things are and the faster they change, the more valuable it is to keep multiple options alive. 'Volatility is not your enemy,' says John H. Holland, computer scientist and thinker at the University of Michigan and the Santa Fe Institute. English essayist Francis Bason [1561-1626] figured this out nearly 400 years ago. 'If a man [or woman!] beging with certainties, he shall end in doubts,' he wrote. 'But if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties.'" (Pete Coy and Neil Gross, 1999, 21 Ideas For The 21st Century. Business Week, August 30, 1999, pages 81-82, page 82.)

"THE HOT NEW JOB in agriculture is bioinformatics. The big push by chemical firms into crop biotechnology ignites demand for college graduates trained in computer programming and biology, to mine the growing data about plant genes. 'They're hard to find and everybody wants them,' says Tracy Hendricks, a recruiter at Monsanto Co., St. Louis, where the bioinformatics group grew 50% to 100 people in two years. The starting salary of a bioinformatics Ph.D. is around $70,000, plus stock options and signing bonus. CuraGen Corp., a New Haven, Conn., biotechnology firm, wants to add nine. 'I'm constantly making counteroffers,' says Martin Leach, a CuraGen executive and bioinformatics expert. 'I'm getting four calls a week from recruiters myself'" [stress added]. (Anon., The Wall Street Journal, August 17, 1999, page 1)


[1] © These pages were begun on 25 August 1999; at the time of the first posting, individuals were told that they could bookmark this page by subscribing to a "robot" like http://www.netmind.com/html/url-minder.html which would alert them when changes were made. The Fall 1999 updates were made over the period of August 25, 1999 through December 6, 1999; the Spring 2000 updates began Janurary 25, 2000. These pages are my own personal continuation of a CELT funded project for the 1998-1999AY when I served as a "consultant" to various colleagues on the CSU, Chico campus. Over the 1998-1999AY I created http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/1998-99LPP.html and I made my final report to Provost McNall on May 11, 1999 (http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/1998-1999LPPFinRept.html) summarizing my activities as a consultant for the 1998-1999 Academic Year. "Charlie's URLs (and Words) 1999-2000" is a continuation of the 1998-1999 project. I am "doing" these pages because (#1) I updated my Fall 1999 ANTH 13 course (Human Cultural Diversity, http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/syllabi/SYL_13-F99.html) as well as ANTH 296/296H (Proseminar in the History of Theory and Method in Anthropology, http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/syllabi/SYL_296-F99.html) as needed, (#2) will update my Spring 1999 ANTH 13 course (Human Cultural Diversity, http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/syllabi/SYL_13-SP2000.html) as well as ANTH 296/296H (Proseminar in the History of Theory and Method in Anthropology, http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/syllabi/SYL_296-SP2000.html) and, (#3) some previous Project Directors (as well as current Project Directors) might find the information on these pages of some value. To return to the beginning of this page, please click here.

[This page printed from http://www.csuchico.edu/~curban/URLs&Words1999-2000.html]


To go to the home page of Charles F. Urbanowicz.

To go to the home page of the Department of Anthropology.

To go to the home page of California State University, Chico.


For more information, please contact Charles F. Urbanowicz
Copyright © 1999 Charles F. Urbanowicz

Anthropology Department, CSU, Chico
5 May 2000 by CFU