Intonation, the pitch patterns in a sentence, often presents problems for students.   Notice, for example, that the following sentence can be a statement or a question, depending upon the intonation:  He died yesterday  versus He died yesterday?

                  In general,  overt teaching of intonation patterns has a somewhat limited usefulness.   Intonation appears to be something that, by and large, students either do or do not pick up on their own.    However,  Carolyn Graham's Jazz Chants contains chants (not songs but chants), which not only are fun but seem to help with intonation.  In addition to their value for teaching intonation, all of the chants also have other grammatical features that can be exploited.  For example, Graham has the following chant, with the theme of selfishness (Jazz Chants: Rhythms of American English for Students of English as a Second Language. 1978. Oxford University Press, p. 15; other far more recent versions are in print---I happened to have bought it early):

Selfish

This is mine!
That's yours!
Don't touch mine!
Get your own!

This is mine!
That's yours!
This is mine!
That's yours!

This is mine!
That's yours!
That's yours!
That's yours!

Hey, what are you doing?
What are you doing with that?
That's mine!


Hey, what are you doing?
What are you doing with that?
That's his!

Hey, what are you doing?
What are you doing with that?
That's hers!

What's mine is mine.
What's yours is yours.
What's his is his.
What's hers is hers.
What's ours is ours.
What's theirs is theirs.

The chant is in clear, non-idiomatic, standard English.  In fact, because it is a chant rather a song,  it does not even have the countless little distortions of language common to many songs.