GEOG/LAST 357.72: Lands and Peoples of Latin America

Syllabus


 

Men are so inclined to content themselves with what is commonest; the spirit and the senses so easily grow dead to the impressions of the beautiful and perfect, that every one should study, by all methods, to nourish in his mind the faculty of feeling these things. ...For this reason, one ought every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.

     Goethe, Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship. Bk. v, ch. 1 (Carlyle, tr.) [source: Stevenson]


Spring 2014                                                                                         Dr. Scott Brady

                                                                                        Office: 523 Butte Hall

Location: Cyberspace                                                                           Phone: 898-5588

Office Hours: MWF 12-12:50                                                                                          

sbrady@csuchico.edu


Description:  

Study of the physical environment, human settlement, development, and modern problems of the nations of Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. This course is designed to be a component of the Upper-Division Theme on Mexico and Central America. This is an approved General Education course. This is an approved Global Cultures course. This course is the same as LAST 357.


How the course fits the Global Development Pathway: This course presents fundamental geographic concepts in the context of Latin America.  Initial emphasis is placed on the region’s physical environments and its diverse peoples.  Students then explore the relationships that have emerged between Latin America’s peoples and environments.  The course concludes by considering different paths to socio-economic development that have been pursued in the region.  The course supports the pathway’s emphasis on development. The course has been proposed for the Global Cultures designation.


Course Student Learning Objectives Associated GE Student Learning Objectives

   Students can formulate, investigate and answer geographic research questions.

   Written Communication

   Active Inquiry

   Students can understand how natural resources and the physical environment influence land and life in Latin America.

   Sustainability

   Students can analyze information from different physical or social sciences from a geographic perspective.

   Active Inquiry

 


How Course will Meet GE SLOs: This course will meet three GE SLOs, as noted in the table above. Written communication and Active Inquiry will be met by the research assignment. The course will study sustainability as a concept and challenge for Latin American peoples as they interact with its diverse physical environments. Students will further practice active inquiry in weekly question sets that focus critically on the assigned readings.  Student learning of sustainability and practice of active inquiry will be assessed by means of quizzes and exams that will include short essay questions.


How Course will Assess GE SLOs: Assessment of GE SLOs is based on the Collegiate Learning Assessment, the gold standard in the assessment of value-added learning. Instructors of GEOG 357 utilize pre- and post-tests to effectively measure learning.  The test consists of open-ended questions related to sustainability. The same test will be administered twice during the semester: once during the first week and once during the final week of classes. Comparison of pre- and post-tests scores will indicate the level of student learning.


Course Objectives:

   To increase students understanding of the geographical context of Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.

   To develop students' knowledge of the region's connections to, and interdependencies with, other people and places around the world.

   To develop students' skills in synthesizing and analyzing information, including Internet-based information.

   To develop students' skills in writing and discussing their ideas.

To help students read, listen, observe, and reason critically

      

 

Required Materials:

There is no required textbook or reader for this course. Instead our readings will be pdf files or articles from web-sites.


 

Academic Policies and Regulations

Final grades are based on % of 200  or 250 total points, earned from the categories below. 
A=92-100%; B= 80-91%; C=68-79%; D=50-67%; and F= less than 50%. 
 

 

Exam 1

50 points

Exam 2

50 points

Exam 3

50 points

Exam 4

50 points

 Research Paper (optional)

 50 points

  Total

 250 points

 

 

 

 

If you choose not to complete the research project, your grade will be based on 4 exams. See below

Exam 1

50 points

 

Exam 2

50 points

 

Exam 3

50 points

 

 Exam 4

 50 points

 

Total

200 points

 


Website: I will regularly update the course website.  Students must visit the site to be aware of changes and additions.  You will find links to websites embedded in each week of the course.  I will also post questions beneath these links that will guide your viewing of these sites.  The information that I guide you to will be covered on exams.


Course Format: This is an online readings course.  We never meet.  We read, do exercises, take 4 exams and write a paper.  Students may utilize the chat room feature on our Blackboard site.  I will not monitor chats and they will not be graded.  Students should utilize the chat room as a support tool.  You can exchange questions, information and helpful hints in the chat room. 


Email: Students should utilize the email feature on our Blackboard site for all communication with me. Sometimes students ask questions that are shared by other students.  In such cases, I'll post my answer as an announcement on the Blackboard site.


Office Hours:  I also will use office hours to answer students’ email inquiries. This will require patience. Students should not expect immediate responses to emails. I will respond only during office hours.


Readings: A fundamental element of a liberal education is the development of the ability to read critically. Hence, your success in this course largely depends on the amount of time and effort you devote to the assigned readings.


Question Sets:  To ensure that students keep up with the assigned readings, students must complete question sets that guide them through assigned textbook readings. You do not turn in question sets to be graded.  You simply complete them to prepare yourself for the exams.  I post question set keys every week or so, so that you may check your answers against mine.


Exams: There are 4 exams.  They are open book exams that include information from the readings, question sets, atlas exercises other materials that I direct you to through the web-site.  Exams contain 20-25 multiple choice/short answer questions.  I will make exams available for a 2-day period. Students will have ~60 minutes to complete exams.


Make-up Exams: I do not allow students to make-up missed exams.


Optional Research Project: Students have the option of completing a research project in this course.  The research project is an annotated bibliography of at least 1500 words. It has two parts: a proposal and the final project. The instructions for the proposal are at this link. The instructions for the final project are at this link. Here's a past example of an annotated bibliography: link.


Students will turn in this project in the body of an email, not as an email attachment.  You can do that if your email program allows you to send the message/paper to me in the "rich text" format.  Proposals must be submitted to my Blackboard email account in the body of an email, not as an attachment.


Plagiarism: Unfortunately, students have committed plagiarism on their annotated bibliographies during past semesters.  They copied work from an online source and presented it as their own.  I referred these students to judicial affairs and asked that they receive the most severe penalty.  I will continue to do so.  

The University catalogue http://www.csuchico.edu/catalog/cat05/ includes an overly general description of activities that constitute plagiarism.  I have included it below.   

"Plagiarism: Copying homework answers from your text to hand in for a grade; failing to give credit for ideas, statement of facts, or conclusions derived from another source; submitting a paper downloaded from the Internet or submitting a friend's paper as your own; claiming credit for artistic work (such as a music composition, photo, painting, drawing, sculpture, or design) done by someone else."

Please review the detailed explanation of plagiarism found at this site: http://www.collegeboard.com/article/0,3868,2-10-0-10314,00.html.  Please use in-text citations to give credit to your sources.  If you have any questions about plagiarism, please contact me.


Online Resources:

   World Population Density

Mexico: 

Š      http://maps.live.com/

Š      http://www.inegi.gob.mx/geo/default.asp

Š      http://mexicochannel.net/maps_en.htm

Š      http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/atlas_mexico/

Š      http://www.ontheroadin.com/

Š      http://www.ontheroadin.com/travelinnformation/Mexico Wal-Mart Locations.htm

Š      http://mexicomike.com/maps_of_mexico/mexican-highway-map.htm

Š      http://atlas.freshlogicstudios.com/

Š      http://www.mexconnect.com/mex_/michoacan/michoacanindex.html

Š      http://www.bluemexico.com/Resources/Maps/mexican-states.gif


Tentative Schedule:


Week 1: 1/20-1/24

Monday: Martin Luther King Jr. Day

 

Readings:

1. Bates, Marston. 1952. “Tropical Climates”. In, Where winter never comes; a study of man and nature in the Tropics. New York, Scribner.

Question Set #1: 

Key

2. Bates, Marston. 1952. “The Rain Forest”. In, Where winter never comes; a study of man and nature in the Tropics. New York, Scribner.

Question Set #2:

Key 

You might enjoy this skit about US citizens’ ignorance of Mexico and Central America

http://www.theonion.com/content/video/hurricane_bound_for_texas_slowed

 

Climate

 

Climate is the long-term average of four atmospheric conditions: temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind and precipitation.  This week we’ll look at web-sites and a climagraph exercise to learn about these climatic conditions.  First open the link below.  It’s a world climate map.  Scroll over to Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, which I will refer to as Middle America, and notice the different climate regions.  Obviously this map includes more detail than the climate map that Bates used.  For right now I want to you identify the 3 largest climate types in Middle America and their general locations. 

 

http://www.boqueteweather.com/images/world_climate_map.jpg

 

 

Earth-Sun Relations

 

Earth-Sun Relations determine the long-term average of temperature.  They also influence the other three atmospheric conditions that comprise a climate.

 

Visit the link below to see an animation of Earth-Sun Relations.

           

http://esminfo.prenhall.com/science/geoanimations/animations/01_EarthSun_E2.html

 

This animation would be even better if it included the Heat Equator that Bates discusses in the assigned reading. The Heat Equator, which causes the most intense heating on the surface of the earth, swings back and forth from the Tropic of Cancer on to the Tropic of Capricorn.  You can think of the Heat Equator as the bearer of summer.  As it moves over, or near, a particular latitude, it brings the warm season. So, when the Heat Equator moves to the Tropic of Cancer, the northern hemisphere begins its warm season.   The portion of Earth’s surface between the two tropic lines is always near the Heat Equator, so tropical areas have a permanent warm season.

 

Here is the sequence of the Heat Equator’s progression from tropic line to tropic line: 

 

On December 21 or 22, our Winter Solstice, the Heat Equator is at the Tropic of Capricorn, 23.5° S. 

On March 21 or 22, our Spring Equinox, the Heat Equator is at the Equator, 0°.  

On June 21 or 22, our Summer Solstice, the Heat Equator is at the Tropic of Cancer, 23.5° N. 

On September 22, our Autumnal Equinox, the Heat Equator is at the Equator, 0°.

And the cycle continues.

 

This animation does show what Bates was speaking of when he discussed the Heat Equator.  To view this, you must click the “Show Earth Profile” tab.  You will see that as the earth orbits the sun, the Earth Profile image shows the latitudes at which the “vertical rays of the sun” strike Earth’s surface.  “Vertical rays” are the same thing as the Heat Equator.

 

As you may have already learned, some of Middle America’s pre-Columbian civilizations had already figured out this cycle long before the arrival of the Spaniards.

 

 

Atmospheric Pressure and Circulation, including hurricanes

 

 

Open the two links below to familiarize yourself with atmospheric pressure and circulation. The movement of air in the lower atmosphere is described by the concepts atmospheric pressure and wind. Atmospheric pressure refers to the vertical movement of air.  In high pressure, air is subsiding, or sinking, to the earth’s surface.  In low pressure, air is ascending, or rising, from the earth’s surface.  This web-site animation shows several large areas of persistent high and low pressure with thick blue arrows. Arrows pointing up indicate low pressure. 

Arrows pointing down indicate high pressure: http://www.uwmc.uwc.edu/geography/100/circulanim/circul_anim.htm.   

 

Persistent low pressure is found in the tropics. This low-pressure system is known as the Equatorial Low or Doldrums.  Persistent high-pressure areas are found at roughly 30° N and 30° S latitude.  These high-pressure systems are known as the Sub-Tropical High Pressure Systems (STH). The animation shows that these systems shift seasonally.  This movement of these pressure systems is caused by the seasonal movement of the Heat Equator.

 

What causes low pressure?  Well, what causes air to rise?  Heating.  So, the intense heating located at the Heat Equator creates the low-pressure system that swings like a pendulum across the tropics.

 

Why does the animation show clouds at the tropical low-pressure system?  Because, the lifting of moist air (low pressure) causes clouds to form.

 

On the animation, why aren’t there clouds by the Sub-Tropical High Pressure systems?  Because air descends/subsides in a high-pressure system.  Hence, the STH does not include the lifting of moist air that is required for cloud formation

 

Look at the image at this link to see the wind belts that are created by air moving from high to low pressure systems.

 

The Northeast Trade Winds prevail between 0° and 23.5° N.  These winds blow warm, moist air over Middle America’s tropical regions. Northern Mexico is dominated by the STH.  The descending air in the STH causes the deserts of Sonora and Chihuahua and the arid climate of Baja.

 

Hurricanes, tropical cyclones, are seasonal atmospheric phenomena that affect Middle America. Open the two links below and view the general tracks of hurricanes. Hurricane season occurs between June 1 and the October 31, when the oceans in the tropics of the Northern Hemisphere are heated by their proximity to the Heat Equator.

 

http://ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/(Gh)/guides/mtr/hurr/hurtrack/index.html

 

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pastprofile.shtml

 

 

 

Map. I encourage you to print out several copies of the map and draw in the Tropic of Cancer.  It will show you which portions of Middle America are tropical according to latitude. 

 

Climagraph exercise.  Please open this Word file and do the climagraph exercise.  Climagraphs are a useful way to learn about the climate of specific locations. The file includes a climagraph for Chico and several locations in Middle America.

Here is a sample of a completed climagraph: Sample

 

Here is the key to the climagraph exercise.

 

 


Week 2: 1/27-1/31

 

Readings:

3. Carr, Archie. 1953. “The Weeping Woods". In, High Jungles and Low. Gainesville, University Press of Florida.

Question Set #3:

Key

 

4. Wallace, David Rains. 1997. “Central American landscapes”. In, Central America: a natural and cultural history, edited by Anthony G. Coates. New Haven: Yale University Press. 

Questions to consider:For this chapter I will not post questions. Instead, I want you to write down the main characteristics of each of the landscapes/regions, and to know the geographic location and extent of each.

 

 

Power point presentations:

Hey Folks. Please view the ppt.s below to learn the landscapes that subduction and tropical climates have created in Middle America.

1. Subduction

2. Forest Regions.

3. An overview of Mexico’s physical geography.

4. Middle America's Physical Landscape Regions

 

 

More information about atmospheric circulation and its role in atmospheric moisture.

 

To review, Sub-Tropical High Pressure systems do not generally create clouds. Why?  Because air descends/subsides in a high-pressure system.  Hence, the STH does not include the lifting of moist air that is required for cloud formation

 

Look at the image at this link to see the wind belts that are created by air moving from high to low pressure systems.

 

The Northeast Trade Winds prevail between 0° and 23.5° N.  These winds blow warm, moist air over Mexico’s tropical region.

 

Northern Mexico is dominated by the STH.  The descending air in the STH causes the deserts of Sonora and Chihuahua and the arid climate of Baja. When it moves southward (between October-April), it brings a dry season to much of Mexico and Central America. 

 

Look at the map at this link Precipitation map.  In north central Mexico, you will see the words “Summer Maximum”.  That means that most precipitation occurs during the summer months, just like your climographs show. During the summer months the STH, and the dry conditions it causes, is north of Mexico and causing our dry season in the California’s Central Valley.  Look at the same map off the coast of northern California.  There you will see “Winter Maximum. This means northern California experiences it wettest months during the winter, which is when Mexico is experiencing its driest months. Where is the STH in the winter? In Mexico. 

 

This map Vegetation map shows how vegetation regions extend from Southern Mexico into Central America.  The Weeping Woods described by Carr are the “Mixed forest” shown on the map. The rain forest described by Bates is the “Tropical rain forest” on the map.

 

Here is the key to the climograph exercise.  Compare my climographs with yours and see if you can understand how the seasonal migration of the STH influences the graphs.

 

Plate Tectonics

 

The shape of Middle America’s land surface is complex. Rugged mountains and mile-high plateaus make up much of its area. Recently active volcanoes punctuate the skyline and frequent earthquakes regularly shake life up. The dominant tectonic process that has created Middle America’s is subduction, which occurs when the Cocos Plate drives under the North American Plate off Mexico’s southern Pacific coast and also on in the eastern Caribbean.  You can see that process at this link:

http://esminfo.prenhall.com/science/geoanimations/animations/35_VolcanicAct.html

 

After opening up the page, click on “Continental volcanic arc.” Then click the arrow to see the process of subduction.  The only problem with this animation is that it shows an oceanic plate moving westward under a continental plate.  The directions are reversed in Mexico.  As the animation shows, volcanism is one product of subduction.  Another is seismic activity, specifically earthquakes. This link http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsww/ shows an up-to-date map of earthquakes around the world. You can see how earthquakes often cluster along Mexico’s Pacific coast and the eastern Caribbean where subduction occurs.

 

 


Week 3: 2/3-2/7                Mesoamerica

Readings:

5. Denevan, William. 1992. The Pristine Myth: The Landscape of the Americas in 1492.  Annals of the Association of American Geographers., 83: 369-385.  

 

Question Set #4:

Key

 

6. West, R C. 1998. Mesoamerican Subsistence Techniques. Pp. 77-102 in Latin American Geography: Historical-Geographical Essays, 1941-1998, Miles E. Richardson (editor). Geoscience and Man, Baton Rouge.

 

Question Set #5:

Key

7. http://www.mindfully.org/Heritage/2003/Civilization-Collapse-EndJun03.htm

 

http://www.geog.ucla.edu/people/faculty.php?lid=3078&display_one=1&modify=1

 

Question Set #6:

Key

 

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/09/pictures/120905-maya-murals-found-kitchen-science-mayan/

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/08/pictures/130807-maya-frieze-discovered-holmul-guatemala-archaeology/

 

Power point presentations

5.    Subsistence

6.    Maya Collapse

7.    Mesoamerica

 

Resources:

 

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/columnist/vergano/2009-09-19-mayan-collapse_N.htm?se=yahoorefer

http://www.ancientmexico.com/content/timeline/index.html

http://faculty.fullerton.edu/nfitch/nehaha/index.htm

http://www.ancientmexico.com/content/map/tenochtitlan.html

http://faculty.washington.edu/petersen/alfonso/13thcent.jpg

Resources:

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/columnist/vergano/2009-09-19-mayan-collapse_N.htm?se=yahoorefer

 

http://www.ancientmexico.com/content/timeline/index.html

 

http://faculty.fullerton.edu/nfitch/nehaha/index.htm

 

http://www.ancientmexico.com/content/map/tenochtitlan.html

 

http://faculty.washington.edu/petersen/alfonso/13thcent.jpg

  

 


Week 4: 2/10-2/14

 

Hey Folks.  Exam 1 will be available at our Blackboard site from 8 am, Monday, February 17, until 5 pm, Tuesday, February 18.  

 

Here’s a study guide: Exam One Study Guide

 

I will post an announcement on our Blackboard site with more details next week. 

 

 

Readings:

 

8. Foote, T. 1991.  Where Columbus Was Coming From. Smithsonian, December 1991: 28-41.

            This article is available at this link: 355foote.pdf 

Question Set #7:

Key 

Video: The Caribbean 1492

1.    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=plpp&v=WbudoRYvhJc&app=desktop&noredirect=1

2.    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6fvTHVq5SU

3.    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rup_ZtVxLq4

Question set #8 

Key

 

 

Mee, Charles. 1992. That Fateful Moment When Two Civilizations came face to face. Smithsonian 23: 56-69. Link

 

No question set

 

 

Annotated bibliography proposal is due on Monday, March 3.


Week 5: 2/17-2/21

 

Exam 1 will be available at our Blackboard site from 8 am, Monday, February 17, until 5 pm, Tuesday, February 18.  

 

Readings (These will not be covered on Exam 1)

 

1. Brady, S. 1999. “An historical geography of the earliest colonial routes across the American isthmus.” Revista Geografica, 126: 121-143.

Question Set:

Key

 

 

2. Sauer, C. O. 1941. The Personality of Mexico. Geographical Review 31:353-364.

Question Set:

Key 

 

Annotated bibliography proposal is due on Monday, March 3.


Week 6: 2/24-2/28

 

Colonial Middle America and Greater Antilles

Readings:

3. Curtis, W. 2006.  and a Bottle of Rum. Crown Publishers: New York p. 14-36.

4. Curtis, W. 2006.  and a Bottle of Rum. Crown Publishers: New York p. 37-63.

Question Set:  

Key

5. Potter R. & Lloyd-Evans S. 1997. “Sun, Fun and a Rum Deal: Perspectives on Development in the Caribbean”, FOCUS on Geography Vol. 44:  pp. 19-26.

Question Set:  

Key

 

6. Abridged chapter from Jared Diamond’s “Collapse”. http://www.theglobalist.com/StoryId.aspx?StoryId=4776

 

Haiti-Dominican Republic Border

 

Question Set:  

Key

 

 

Power point presentation

Sugar 

 

Here are some useful websites for your annotated bibliographies:

Google Scholar: http://scholar.google.com/schhp?hl=en&tab=ws

Council on Hemispheric Affairs: http://www.coha.org/

Latin American Network Information Center - LANIC: http://lanic.utexas.edu/ 

 

Annotated bibliography proposal is due on Monday, March 3.


Week 7: 3/3-3/7

 

Greater Antilles

Required Readings and Viewing

 

 

Required Viewing:I want you to view the documentary, Life and Debt. It is posted on our Blackboard site in the “Media Gallery”.

 

Life and Debt Questions: 

         Key

 

 

Required viewing: I want you to watch the documentary “Cuba after Castro”. Four parts of the documentary are found below.

Question Set:

Key

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AA2uowJkA6I&feature=relmfu 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gqHbBvIrGk&feature=relmfu

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6xFGMz2sDw&feature=relmfu

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xodHG5-n6JI&feature=relmfu 

 

 

Required Readings

Babb, F. 2011. Che, Chevys, and Hemingway's Daiquiris: Cuban Tourism in a Time of Globalisation.” Bulletin of Latin American Research,Volume 30, Issue 1, p. 50–63. 

 

Question set: 

Key 


Week 8  3/10-3/14

 

Regions of Mexico

Readings:   

1. Kaplan, R. 1997. History Moving North. Atlantic Monthly, February.

2. Casagrande, L. 1987. The Five Nations of Mexico. FOCUS on Geography: 2-9.

Question Set:   

      Key 

 

Power point presentation

Regions of Mexico 


Week 9: 3/17-3/21

 

Spring Break


Week 10: 3/24-3/28         Core

Exam 2 will be available at our Blackboard site from 8am, Tuesday, March 25 until 5pm, Wednesday, March 26.  It will cover only materials that we have considered since Exam 1. It will cover materials from Week 5, 6 and 7 but not materials about current regions of Mexico.

Exam 2 Study Guide

 

 

Mexico City and Core

Required Readings:

3. Guillermoprieto, Alma. 1990. Letter from Mexico City, The New Yorker, September 17, 1990, p. 93-103. No question set

4. Hamill, Pete. 1993. When the Air was Clear. Audubon, January-February, 1993, p. 40-49. No question set

5. Malmstrom, V. 1995. Geographical Origins of the Tarascans.  Geographical Review: 31-39. No question set

Power point presentations

Mexico City ppt.

Core Region ppt


Week 11: 3/31-4/4           South Mexico/Mex-Central America

CŹsar Chąvez Day: No Class on Monday

 

6. Harner, J. 2002. Muebles Rusticos in Mexico and the United States. Geographical Review 92: 354-371.

 

7. Bass, J and Brady, S. 2011. The Changing Anatomy of Mexican Towns: repeat study and Stanislawski’s Michoacan. The Pennsylvania Geographer 49(1): 18-42.

 

"The peasant from Central Mexico faces less risk and uncertainty from U.S. migration than from any other possible income-generating activity.  He risks more with the status quo - relying on an unreliable resource base, a rigid local social structure, undependable government programs, and uncertain job opportunities in other Mexican cities - than in seeking work in the United States."  Ambivalent Journey, Jones, 1995.

 


Week 12   4/7-4/11

 

Exam Three will be available at our Blackboard site from 8am on Thursday, April 17 until 5pm on Friday, April 18.

Required Readings:

8. 354oaxacatequio.pdf

Question Set:    

Key

 

9. Participatory mapping in Oaxaca.

This is an article that I wrote about some research I worked on a few years ago among the Zapotecs who live in the Sierra Juarez of Oaxaca.

 

 

10. Microfinance in Mexico and Oaxaca. Read the short articles at the links below and complete the question set.

http://www.businessweek.com/stories/2007-12-12/the-ugly-side-of-microlending

       This article is incomplete. However, enough of it is available to complete the question set.

 

        http://www.envia.org/what_we_do.html

       http://www.thetravelword.com/2010/11/10/creating-community-through-volunteering-in-oaxaca-mexico/

 

       Question set:

         Key

 

 

Power point presentations

Southern Highlands/Oaxaca Overview ppt

  

Oaxaca Participatory Mapping

 

Microfinance ppt

 

 


Week 13  4/14-4/18

 

Hey Folks.  Exam Three will be available at our Blackboard site from 8am on Wednesday, April 16 until 5pm on Friday, April 18.  I’m making it available one day earlier to free up time for Easter travel.

Exam Three will not cover material that begins in Week 14

Exam 3 Study Guide 

11. Dozier, C. 1963 Mexico’s Transformed Northwest. Geographical Review 53: 548-571. Click here for article.

       Question Set:

               Key

12. San Quintin. Chapter from True Tales from Another Mexico by Sam Quinones (2001).

              Question Set:  

                  Key

               


Week 14: 4/21-4/25                       

Central American Rimland

 

http://www.harpercollege.edu/mhealy/mapquiz/midamer/mmrimfr.htm

 

Required Online Readings:

1. Brief History of Banana Republics

2.http://www.uwec.edu/Geography/Ivogeler/w111/banana.htm

3.http://www.jimmccluskey.com/banana.html

4.http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/20070320_chiquitas_slipping_appeal/

 

Question Set:

Key

 

Required Online Viewing:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rb7XaF1rs1E

 

 

Optional Online Viewing:

http://www.archive.org/details/Journeyt1950

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFDOI24RRAE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HmeEILEBltM&feature=related

 

Required Online Reading: No Question Set

5. http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/sci;313/5786/481?ck=nck

 

 

The traditional music and dance of the Garifuna have become popular.  The general term for numerous Garifuna dances and songs is "punta". The songs are call and response. Many of the dances are courtship dances.  Here are 4 youtube examples.  
 


 

The first is from Hopkins, Belize where I did research in 1989.  It shows how the community has incorporated dance instruction into the education system.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tB3vThV3_ls



 

The second is from Livingston, Guatemala.  It shows how Garifuna kids perpetuate the dancing and rhythm informally.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaTR5qlNrZ0&feature=related

The third is from Los Angeles, California, one of the largest centers of Garifuna immigrants in the US. It demonstrates how the Garifuna continue to practice the traditional art form in very different trappings. Instead of on sandy ground in the Central American Rimland in the shade of Atlantic Tall or Malayan Dwarf coconut trees, this jam takes place in a well furnished living room complete with the big screen TV. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uU-t9_JSH2Y 

 

 

The last one focuses on Garifuna women and demonstrates their role in preserving these traditions. 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_SfsJkuYjo8&feature=related

 

A core component of cultural survival is the survival of a culture’s language. This web-site seeks to utilize the Web to preserve the Garifuna language: http://www.garifunainstitute.com/

 

 

Required Reading:

 

6. Nietschmann, B. 1998. Protecting Indigenous Coral Reefs and Sea Territories. In Conservation Through Cultural Survival, Ed. Stan Stevens, Washington D.C.: Island Press.

           

Question Set

Key

               

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUfiU8hqymA&feature=related

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhMKaT7Lt9c 

 

Power Point Presentations

 

Banana Republics ppt

Garifuna ppt

La Mosquitia ppt 

 

Resources:

 

http://berkeley.edu/news/berkeleyan/2000/02/02/bernard.html

 

http://www.conserveturtles.org/about.php?page=carr

 

http://www.miskito-nicaragua.de/nicarag/karten4.htm

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/03/08/MNIC152S2Q.DTL&type=printable


Week 15: 4/28-5/2           Central American Rimland and Upland Interior

 

The due date for your annotated bibliography is Friday, May 2nd.

 

 

7. Frenkel, Stephen. 1996.  Jungle Stories: North American Representations of Tropical Panama. Geographical Review, Vol. 86, No. 3, pp. 317-333.

Question Set #8: 

Key

 

Web Resources

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUkSxted6pQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NR4eXZSZhEg&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bw15q1-Vv4g

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9svL4qIkOW8

http://www.ssqq.com/travel/panamacanal2012x04.htm

 

8. Can Coffee Drinkers Save the Rain Forest?

Question Set #9:

 Key

 

9. Arbona S. 1998. “Commercial agriculture and agrochemicals in Almolonga, Guatemala”, Geographical Review Vol. 88: pp. 47-63.

 

Question Set: 

Key

 

 

Example of annotated bibliography  This link http://www.aallnet.org/products/2004-47.pdf no longer works.  It used to lead to an example of an annotated bibliography that a student copied during a previous semester.  The primary lesson is do not copy or plagiarize. This week you should make final edits and complete your annotated bibliographies.  They are due on    . Be certain to review the assignment instructions above and the description about plagiarism.  If you have any questions, contact me. You must turn your paper into turnitin.com before turning it in to me. 
The instructions for Turnitin.com are at this link. This is a required part of your annotated bibliography assignment.  You should submit your paper to turnitin.com 3 or 4 days before so that you will have time to correct any errors.

The due date for your annotated bibliography is Friday, May 2nd.

 

Power Point Presentations

Panama ppt

Coffee ppt

Almolonga

 

Web Resources

 


Week 16: 5/5-5/9

 

10. Brady, S. 2009.  Revisiting a Honduran Landscape Described by Robert West: An Experiment in Repeat Geography. Journal of Latin American Geography pp. 7-27.

No question set: 
  

11. Tormented Isthmus, from The Economist. April 14th, 2011.

       Question set      

         Key

 

       Map that accompanied the article

 

Power Point Presentations

Lenca 

 

Exam Four Study Guide


Week 17: 5/12-5/16         Final Exam Week

           Exam 4 will be available from Monday at 8 am until Friday at 5 pm. Not Friday at midnight.