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College of Agriculture

Angel De Trinidad

Crops, Horticulture, and Land Resource Management

If he’s not in class, you can almost guarantee to find sophomore Angel De Trinidad in University Village chatting with students and planning the next event for his residents. As the resident advisor for agricultural theme housing, he is the welcoming face and supportive shoulder for many first-year students in the College of Agriculture throughout the semester.

De Trinidad grew up in Orange and had a unique venture to Chico State. With no obvious ties to agriculture but with an interest in veterinary medicine and a yearning for a beautiful campus with a farm and surrounding nature, Chico State fit the bill. It wasn’t until coming to Chico for freshman orientation that he realized the extent of the opportunities available to him.

“When I first toured Chico State, I was here for orientation so it was all new. I’d never been north of Sacramento, but I took a risk when I accepted,” De Trinidad said. “It was all worth it because I’ve found my second home, and now I get to give students that same comfort as an RA.”

After a summer of contemplation following Summer Orientation, and a first week of classes in the fall, Angel made the switch to the crops, horticulture, and land resource management major and has fallen deeper in awe ever since. 

“My first lab in PSSC 101 (“Introduction to Plant Science”) was the real turning point. Getting to immediately do hands-on activities in lab, it felt right,” he said, “and I switched my major that first week.”

In addition to the “Introduction to Plant Science course,” the “Principles of Cellular and Molecular Biology” class (BIOL 151), solidified De Trinidad’s initial interest in genetics, and the pieces have slowly fallen into place.

While taking his lower-division courses, De Trinidad recognizes his experiences at Chico State in and out of class will only further shape his path. Exploring an interest in soil science, the sophomore looks forward to getting his hands dirty in hands-on labs, and he hopes to obtain an internship at the farm.

For his own residents, as well other new students, De Trinidad advises taking advantage of all of the student resources the University offers, such as the College of Agriculture’s Student Success Office and the Chico STEM Connections Collaborative.

STEM Connections Collaborative Coordinator, Lindsey Jeffrey, and Interim Associate Dean, Patrick Doyle, have proven instrumental in supporting De Trinidad with his job as RA.

“I have really enjoyed getting to know them, and they have been extremely helpful in not only providing resources for my residents, but for myself as well,” he said.

Of the College of Agriculture, De Trinidad said, “We have a strong support system and people who want us to succeed, which is great especially being so far from home.”

As recognition for his hard work in academics and pursuit of a degree in the industry, De Trinidad earned several scholarships, including the Bell Family Presidential Scholarship. This renewable scholarship recruits students based on academic achievement, commitment to agriculture, leadership, and civic engagement. Concurrent with high qualifications to receive the award, recipients are required to maintain a high grade point average throughout their enrollment.

“Having scholarships have really allowed me to do what I love and have flexibility in my schedule without worrying about the financial aspect of college,” he said.

Upon graduation, De Trinidad looks forward to pursuing graduate school to further develop his interest in plant breeding and genetics with the ultimate goal of teaching.

De Trinidad’s venture to Chico was a great leap, however his new experiences formed his passion and made clear his career path.

“You don’t need the background in agriculture to pursue it. I was nervous coming in and had no clue how big of a role the farm would play, but I’ve gotten hands-on experiences,” he said. “It’s never too late to get into agriculture, and I was able to use the College of Ag as my platform.”