Office of Diversity & Inclusion

Courses

AAST 110: Introduction to Asian Studies
This interdisciplinary course offers students an introduction to some of the many issues facing Asian nations today, grounded in an understanding of the historical, cultural, religious, and philosophical influences that underlie these challenges. The course examines the role of individuals in creating societal change in Asia through such things as political advocacy, cultural innovation, technological invention, the generation of literature, economic decision-making, military force, corruption, and other methods of influence.

AAST 152: Introduction to the Asian American Experience
This course examines the Asian experience in the U.S. over the last 150 year by focusing on the experiences of different Asian ethnic groups. The focus is on early arrival and settlement, and contemporary issues in Asian American communities, including immigration, racism, and Asian American identity.

AAST 253: Asian American Literature
An introduction to various traditions and issues of the Asian American experience in literature. The course explores both early and contemporary novels, poems, and plays by writers of different genders, ethnicities, and cultures.

AAST 330: Hmong Cultural Roots & Contemporary Issues
Study Hmong American roots, including: geographic, demographic, sociocultural, economic, political, religious, and historical elements from the countries of origin. Main emphasis is on how Hmong roots influence contemporary lives of Hmong Americans, starting with their immigration/migration and settlement/resettlement patterns and continuing on the present day. Students explore the complex patterns of Hmong American acculturation and identity, especially with respect to elements of gender, socio-economic class, ethnicity, age and education.

ANTH 200: Cultures of Asia (This course is also offered as ASST 200)
An introduction to the people and cultures of Asia, emphasizing India, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific. The course employs a multimediated approach to learning.

ARTH 140: Asian Art Survey
Survey of the major visual arts of Asia from prehistory to the present, with an emphasis on Buddhist, Hindu, Taoist, and Shinto arts.

ASST 200: Cultures of Asia
An introduction to the people and cultures of Asia, emphasizing India, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific. The course employs a multimediated approach to learning.

ASST 300: Asian Studies: Contemporary Social Problems and Prospects
Study of problems and prospects related to Asia. This course includes a series of in-depth analysis of major issues, current problems, and prospects of Asia. Extensive research, writing, and oral presentations are required.

ASST 377: Gender in East Asian History
Focus on the role gender plays in shaping and defining East Asian history, from 19th century to the present. Analysis of gender construction, sexuality, the family, and issues of universal human rights in context of China, South Korea, and Japan.

AAST 389:  Mentoring Hmong Youth through Performance Activism
Students serve as mentors for high school students participating in the afterschool cultural education program Leaders for a Lifetime (l4L), as the high school students create and present performance activism pieces about culture, equity and inclusion with an emphasis on the Hmong culture. Student assist with team building, script writing, filming, acting, and community events. Three hours of classroom time with the high school students per week plus 45 hours of performance preparation, practice, performance, and evaluation are required. Fall semester is devoted to creation and sharing of video productions on cultural material. Spring semester is devoted to creation and performance of an original theater production. No experience with theater or video is required. The desire to work with youth and an interest in Hmong culture is required.

ASST 399: Special Problems
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member.

ASST 490: Capstone Course
This variable-content capstone seminar is devoted to the critical reading, evaluation, and discussion of major recent scholarship on Asia. Works are selected from a variety of disciplinary perspectives with an effort to cover several Asian areas (Japan, China, Southeast Asia, South Asia) and to deal with critical issues of the day. Students will lead discussions, evaluate arguments, and write critical essays at a level appropriate to graduating seniors with a major in Asian Studies. Required seminar for majors.

ASST 499H: Honors in Asian Studies
Admission to the Honors in the Major program. Honors candidates will write a senior thesis over two semesters on an approved topic related to Asia.

HUMN 224W: Arts and Ides: Asia (W)
A comprehensive introduction to Eastern art, literature, and philosophy, as revealed in the civilizations of India, China, and Japan. The course examines the rise of civilization in India, China, and Japan with special focus on Confucius, Lao Tzu, and the Buddha, and follows the development of artistic and intellectual culture down to modern times.

MEST 110: Introduction to Middle Eastern Studies
Survey of Middle Eastern history, cultures, and societies from late antiquity to the modern period. Investigation of the role of Islam in shaping the Middle East and interactions with the West in the late medieval and modern periods. Examination of contemporary issues, including modernization, colonialism, secularism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the Islamic revival.

MCGS 224: Religion and America's Ethnic Minorities
This course covers the religions that inform America's various ethnic groups, and the historical, cultural, and social experiences and values of Native American, Hispanic-American, Arab-American, African-American, and Asian-American cultures.

MCGS 328: Multicultural Health
Ethnic groups in the U.S. face many health problems. This course focuses on those problems which affect the four largest ethnic groups in the U.S.: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, and Asian Americans. The effects of history, health beliefs and practices, and socioeconomic status on the health of these ethnic populations are addressed. Current and potential strategies to improve health care delivery to these groups are explored.

RELS 110: Asian Religions
An introduction to the religions of the East: Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism.

RELS 200: Religions of South Asia
This course provides an introduction to the religions of South Asia from the earliest times until the present, and provides basic sociological, psychological, philosophical, and anthropological perspectives from which to study them. The main religions explored are Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism with some discussion of Islam in the Indian region as well. All of these religions have deeply influenced Indian society and students are exposed to the literature, art, ideas, and practices of these faiths.

RELS 300/W: Religions of East Asia
This discussion-centered, project-directed course is a complement to RELS 200 (Religion in South Asia). It introduces elementary concepts of comparative religion and the basics of East Asian history. Afterward, it provides basic knowledge of major traditions and important 3 hours discussion.

SOCI 152: Introduction to the Asian American Experience
This course examines the Asian experience in the U.S. over the last 150 years by focusing on the experiences of different Asian ethnic groups. The focus is on early arrival and settlement, and contemporary issues in Asian American communities, including immigration, racism, and Asian American identity.

More information about courses offered can be found in the course catalog.