Office of Diversity & Inclusion

Courses

ANTH 268: Indigenous People of Latin America
Study of the Native peoples of South America, Mexico, and Central America from European contact to the present. The course emphasizes contemporary ethnography and interaction of indigenous people with colonialism and the modern nation-state.

ARTH 471W: Ancient Mexican Art (W)
A survey of ancient Mexican art and culture of formative, classic, conquest, including the Olmec, Teotihuacan, Zapotec, Mxtec, Classic Gulf Coast, Toltec, and Aztec. Sites discussed include El Tajin, La Venta, Monte Alban, Milta, Tula, and Tenochtitlan.

BLMC 319: Bilingual Teaching Competence: Language
This course is taught entirely in Spanish. It is designed to develop bilingual teacher competence in the area of language. The primary goals are to develop language skill in content areas such as mathematics, science, and social studies, and to enhance the language proficiency of bilingual teachers in communication with parents, faculty, and staff. This course will also focus on teaching methodology in each of the content areas.

CHLX 157: Introduction to Latinx
This course explores contemporary issues affecting Latinx communities in the United States, including values, social organization, urbanization, gender, sexuality, and socio-economics. Special attention is paid to issues of colonialism, human rights, U.S. foreign policy toward Latin America, racism, capitalist globalization, migration, emerging political and economic shifts in the Americas, and new local and transnational efforts for social change on the part of Latin America's peoples and Latinx in the U.S.

CHLX 203: Latinx Film: Representation, Resistance, and Disruption
Viewing and analysis of Latinx and Chicanx films, from classics to contemporary popular and critical hits. Feature and documentary films are discussed in sociopolitical context and as cultural production. Special attention is paid to intersections between race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, socio-economic class, and other facets of Latinx identities.

CHLX 358: Latinx in Contemporary Society and Social Justice
This course examines the identities and experiences of Latinx in contemporary society. From identity politics, to immigration policy, to the complex intersections of race, class, gender & sexuality, the broad spectrum of today¿s most pressing issues are investigated. Emerging or changing situations, events, and/or issues may be integrated into the class in any given semester. Latinx groups examined include heritage from throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.

CHLX 135: Mexican Heritage in the United States
Study of the Mexican-American subculture in the United States after 1848: historical background, migration, cultural patterns, folklore, economic and political objectives.

CHLX 157: Introduction to Chicano Studies
This course explores contemporary issues affecting Chicanos in the United States, including cultural values, social organization, urbanization, gender, and socio-economics. Attention is given to how family, religion, and immigration experiences play upon the lifestyles and values held by Chicanas and Chicanos.

CHLX 254: Chicana/o Arts & Ideas
An overview of Chicana/o art, literature, and ideology. The course examines the trajectory of the Chicano Movement and follows the development of artistic and intellectual culture down to contemporary times. We explore how Chicano literature asks enduring and universal questions and at the same time reflects a specific historical and cultural reality that is fundamental to the United States experience. Reading, discussions, and reports are in English (with some code-switching in Spanish).

CHLX 358: Chicanos in Contemporary Society
This course examines the economic, social, and political status of Chicanos and Chicana in the United States since the 1960’s Chicano Movement. Students also consider issues such as immigration, stratification, educational attainment, labor market inequality, and resistance movements.

CHLX 454: Chicano Literature
A study of the Chicano people as reflected in selected films and literature. Discussions will be in Spanish, readings in English and Spanish, reports in Spanish.

ENGL 354/W: American Ethnic & Regional Literature in Focus
This course explores the way place, socio-economic status, gender, and sexuality inform and inflect the experience of particular cultural groups set against the larger American culture. Classes typically focus on African American, Asian American, Chicana/o, or Native American literature.

HIST 382: Modern Mexico
An interdisciplinary approach to the history and politics of Mexico. This course will introduce students to the panorama of Mexican history since 1810 while delineating the roots and development of the current Mexican political system.

LAST 110: Introduction to Latin American Studies
A survey of the history, geography, culture, and society of Latin America. This course is designed to provide students who are majoring in Latin American Studies, as well as General Education students, with an initial orientation in the study of Latin America on an interdisciplinary basis.

LAST 150: Orientation to Mexico Program
Introduction to the Mexico Program of intercultural experiential learning in Mexico. The course will survey Mexican geography, anthropology, development, culture, adjustment to cultural differences, and intercultural communication. The course is intended to prepare the student for the six-week program in Mexico.

LAST 350: History and Politics of Mexico
An interdisciplinary approach to the history and politics of Mexico. This course will introduce students to the panorama of Mexican history while delineating the roots and development of the current Mexican political system. This course is designed to be a component of the Upper-Division Theme on Mexico and Central America.

LAST 398: Special Topics
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered.

LAST 399: Special Problems
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member.

LAST 489: Intercultural Experiential Learning
This course will provide students with a genuine cross-cultural experience which will enable them to understand Latin American life from the point of view of the Latin American family with which they will live and the Latin American people with whom they will work. Students will live with a Latin American family and work in a Latin American organization for a six-week period. Students will keep a log of their experiences and prepare a written evaluation of their families and jobs

LAST 495: Seminar in Selected Topics
An in-depth, interdisciplinary seminar that examines selected topics in Latin American culture and society, past and present, through critical reading of, and commentary on, recent scholarship devoted to the region. Readings may include Spanish language sources. Topics vary by semester. Required for majors and minors.

MCGS 155: Introduction to Multicultural and Gender Studies
An introduction to the concepts, terminology, and issues in multicultural and gender studies, including exploration of America’s multicultural history, gender as an element of culture, and contemporary issues in the field.

MCGS 224: Religion and America’s Ethnic Minorities
An exploration of the religions which inform America’s ethnic minorities. The historical, cultural, and social experiences and values of Native American, Hispanic American, African American, Pacific Islander, and Asian American ethnic minority groups will be examined.

MCGS 328: Multicultural Health
Ethnic groups in the U.S. face many health problems. This course focuses on those problems which affect the four largest ethnic groups in the U.S.: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, and Asian Americans. The effects of history, health beliefs and practices, and socioeconomic status on the health of these ethnic populations are addressed. Current and potential strategies to improve health care delivery to these groups are explored.

MCGS 330: Sociology of Gender
This course examines gender as a social construct and its influences on men and women in families, school, work, politics, and culture. The focus is on how gender varies in relation to ethnicity, race, sexuality, and social class.

MCGS 341: Cross-Cultural Psychology
This course focuses on the importance and various influences of culture on human behavior. Beginning with an examination of theoretical definitions of culture, the course covers a broad range of research that highlights the contributions of cross-cultural psychology to the understanding of human behavior within and between cultures. In addition, conceptual, methodological, and practical issues in cross-cultural research and applications are covered.

MCGS 350: Ethnic and Race Relations
This course examines the social construction of race, and studies ethnic and racial relations in the United States, looking at variations by class, gender, and immigration experiences. Students analyze interpersonal relationships between racial and ethnic groups, discrimination, resistance, social movements, and governmental policies.

PHIL 226: Latin American Philosophy
Latin American Philosophy, introduces students to the rich tradition of Latin American philosophical through, broadly constructed as a field of philosophical reflection, analysis, debate and scholarship know as El Pensamiento Lationamericano. In order to expose students to the fecund and variegated history of Latin American though, we will read writings from Latin American academic philosophers, as well literary theorists, essayists, religious figures, pedagogues, novelists, political leaders and semioticians.

PSYC 151: Socio-Cultural Context of Psychological Development
Examination of social and cultural influences on emotional, social, and intellectual development. Specific emphasis on children raised in lower socio-economic environments as well as children of American Indian, Mexican-American, and black cultures.

SOCI 157: Introduction to Latinx
This course explores contemporary issues affecting Latinx communities in the United States, including values, social organization, urbanization, gender, sexuality, and socio-economics. Special attention is paid to issues of colonialism, human rights, U.S. foreign policy toward Latin America, racism, capitalist globalization, migration, emerging political and economic shifts in the Americas, and new local and transnational efforts for social change on the part of Latin America's peoples and Latinx in the U.S.

SPAN 101: First-Semester Spanish
Introduction to Spanish language and culture. Emphasis on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish.

SPAN 102: Second-Semester Spanish
Continuation of SPAN 101. Emphasis on the fundamental skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish.

SPAN 201: Third-Semester Spanish
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in SPAN 101 and SPAN 102. This course includes composition and reading.

SPAN 201N: Spanish for Spanish Speakers
Reviewing and expanding of language skills possessed by speakers of Spanish who have not studied the language formally. This course includes composition and reading. Particular focus on the Mexican-American/Latino experience.

SPAN 202: Fourth-Semester Spanish
Reviewing and expanding of language skills and cultural concepts introduced in SPAN 101, SPAN 102, and SPAN 201. This course includes composition and reading.

SPAN 202N: Spanish for Spanish Speakers
Further reviewing and expanding of language skills possessed by speakers of Spanish who have not studied the language formally. Builds on topics studied in SPAN 201N. This course includes composition and reading. Particular focus on the Mexican-American/Latino experience.

SPAN 203: Reading and Conversation
Reading practice and discussions designed to further acquaint the student with Hispanic culture and to improve comprehension and vocabulary in preparation for upper-division courses.

SPAN 301: Grammar and Composition
Intensive review of grammar and its application in composition. This course or its equivalent is a prerequisite for all other upper-division courses. Required of all majors and minors.

SPAN 302: Reading and Composition
Emphasis on fluency, style, and syntax. Required of all majors and minors.

SPAN 303: Advanced Oral Expression
Intensive practice in the spoken language at an advanced level of proficiency. Guided conversations and discussions, debates, and speeches. Enrollment will be limited. Native speakers should consult with instructor before enrolling.

SPAN 320: Introduction to Spanish Linguistics
A survey of the fields of general linguistics. Theory and practice of language analysis. Relationship between language and culture. Principles of phonology, morphology, and syntax of Spanish language.

SPAN 321: Spanish Phonology
SPAN 202 or equivalent. May be taken concurrently with SPAN 301 and/or SPAN 303.
Phonology (phonetics and phonemics), linguistic geography, and related areas as they apply to the learning and teaching of Spanish.

SPAN 331: Spanish Culture and Civilization
Introduction to the historical and cultural heritage of Spain, to selected figures in the arts and public life, and to the ways and traditions of Spaniards today. Readings, reports, and discussion.

SPAN 332: Latin American Culture and Civilization
A survey of the cultural, social, economic, and political heritage of Latin America and its evolution into contemporary Latin American society.

SPAN 341: Introduction to Latin American Literature
Introduces students to the study of Hispanic literature and culture, and develops their skills in language comprehension and analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. The works studied will be short stories, full-length plays, and Hispanic-American narrative and lyric poetry. SPAN 341 and SPAN 342 are required of all majors and count as electives for the minor. Either fulfills the prerequisite for all other upper-division literature courses.

SPAN 342: Introduction to Spanish Peninsular Literature
Introduces students to the study of Hispanic literature and culture, and develops their skills in language comprehension and analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. Works studied will be the novel, one-act plays, and Peninsular Spanish narrative and lyric poetry. SPAN 342 is required of all majors and fulfills the prerequisite for all other upper-division literature courses.

SPAN 398: Special Topics
This course is for special topics offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and may vary from term to term and be different for different sections. See the Class Schedule for the specific topic being offered.

SPAN 399: Special Problems
This course is an independent study of special problems offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member.

SPAN 425: Spanish Teaching Methodologies
This is a senior-level Spanish course that introduces students to current theories of foreign language learning and implications of key research for classroom practice. Students learn strategies for teaching Spanish, including the utilization of appropriate technology. In addition to lecture and discussion, students complete the Early Field Experience hours required for entry to a credential program.

SPAN 441: Hispanic Short Story
Study of leading short story writers from Spain and Latin America, with background readings and reports on representative authors. Emphasis on contemporary works.

SPAN 442: Hispanic Theater
Readings, discussions, reports, and oral interpretation of major dramatic works of Latin America and Spain.

SPAN 443: Hispanic Novel
Analysis of representative novels from Latin America and Spain.

SPAN 444: Hispanic Poetry

Study of the leading poets of Spain and Latin America.

SPAN 451: Literature of Mexico
Readings and reports on literature of Mexico from pre-Columbian to contemporary literature.

SPAN 452: Viewing the Hispanic Caribbean
Critical analysis of literature and culture of the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, utilizing reading, discussion, oral reports, and written projects.

SPAN 454: Chicano Literature
A study of the Chicano people as reflected in selected films and literature. Discussions will be in Spanish, readings in English and Spanish, reports in Spanish.

SPAN 461: Don Quixote
Cervantes’ novel and his amiable madman in the larger context of literature and culture. Commentary on contemporary history, society, and politics.

SPAN 471: Women and Literature in the Hispanic World
Women in Spanish-speaking society. An approach to culture via a study of women as literary subjects and as writers. The idealization and reality of their existence as reflected through Spanish and Latin American literature.

SPAN 481: Film and Literature in Spain and Latin America
Students will consider the elements that constitute literary and cinematic masterpieces by examining films based on a variety of texts: epic poetry, drama, short story, legend, novel, zarzuela, and filmscript. The films will represent the cultural and linguistic diversity in areas of Spain and Latin America.

SPAN 489: Directed Field Experience in Spanish
Recommended for majors and graduate students, some minors upon completion of SPAN 302 or equivalent or faculty permission.
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member. Provides students with the opportunity to develop their language proficiency in Spanish and enables them to use their language skills in on-the-job situations. Limited to majors, graduate students, and selected minors upon completion of SPAN 302. A maximum of 3 units may be counted toward the major.

SPAN 497: Spanish Subject Matter Assessment and Writing Proficiency
The course includes two components, the Spanish Subject Matter Assessment Exam and the Writing Proficiency Research Paper. The comprehensive exam covers Spanish language, Spanish linguistics, and Spanish and Latin American literature and culture. The Writing Proficiency Research Paper is an investigative/analytical essay in English on a major work of Hispanic literature. Students show mastery of the major areas of study in Spanish as well as the ability to investigate, plan and write essays using correct English and in a style suitable to literary analysis.

SPAN 499H: Spanish Honors Thesis
Independent Study. Completion of Honors thesis under the direction of assigned Spanish faculty. The thesis, based on studies begun in SPAN 470H, requires original work beyond that normally required in undergraduate work. Students present the thesis in a public lecture.

SPAN 689: Internship
This course is an internship offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register with a supervising faculty member.

SPAN 697: Independent Study
This course is a graduate-level independent study offered for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member.

SPAN 698: Special Topic
This course is a special topic offered for 1.0-3.0 units. Typically the topic is offered on a one-time-only basis and will vary from term to term and be different for different sections.

SPAN 699T: Master’s Thesis
This course is offered as for 1.0-3.0 units. You must register directly with a supervising faculty member.

More information about courses offered can be found in the course catalog.