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Early Outreach and Support Programs

Annual Report 2018-2019 Early Outreach and Support Programs

Table of Contents

Educational Opportunity Program

I. Mission Statement

The mission of the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) is to provide access and support services to first-generation college students who have experienced economic, educational, and/or environmental barriers, but display the potential to succeed in post-secondary education and to assist the university in the matriculation, retention, and graduation of EOP students.

Department Goals (Last reviewed July 2019):

  1. EOP will provide a comprehensive program of support services that will enhance the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary for the academic success and the social and emotional personal development of EOP students. (Division goals 1, 2, 3; University strategic priorities 1, 3)
  2. EOP will promote social, cultural, and ethnic diversity in the CSU, Chico campus population. (Division goal 2; University strategic priorities 4, 7, 8)
  3. EOP will educate and inform students, faculty, and staff about program services and accomplishments. (Division goal 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 2, 4, 5, 8)
  4. EOP professional staff will maintain currency in the fields of college student retention, academic advising and obstacles encountered by first-generation and other historically marginalized college students through memberships in professional organizations, reading appropriate research journals, and professional development opportunities. (Division goals 1, 2; 3; University strategic priorities 2, 4, 5, 8)
  5. EOP will encourage student participation and involvement in the CSU, Chico campus community and the community of Chico as a whole. (Division goals 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 4, 6, 7, 8)

II. Department Accomplishments

  • EOP 50th anniversary events--Kick-off event focused on current students.
  • Summer Bridge English Component created EOP 50th webpage.
  • Highest number of participation for the annual Graduate Diversity Forum.
  • Successful campus collaboration for the first campus wide Tipping Point Summit.
  • Diversity Art Exhibit raised funding for donations to CAMP fire survivors.

Highlights:

  • EOP 50th anniversary events—kick-off event focused on current students.
    EOP commenced the celebrations of our 50th anniversary. In the spring 2019, we hosted our current students and campus alumni to enjoy a short program, cake and promotional stickers to mark this kick-off event. A more formal affair with take place this upcoming fall.
  • Highest number of participation for the annual Graduate Diversity Forum
    EOP coordinates the North State California Forum for Diversity in Graduate Education. In 2017, 41 students signed up and only 30 attended the event at UC Merced.  In 2018, 46 students signed up and 36 students attended. In 2019, 46 signed up to participate. 39 students attended the event and an additional 18 students drove themselves to UC Davis for a grand total of 57 participants.
  • Successful campus collaboration for the first campus wide Tipping Point Summit
    On January 17, 2019 the divisions of Student Affairs and Academic Affairs hosted a campus wide    Student Success Summit. Two EOSP employees were part of the planning committee. One of them co-presented.

Diversity Efforts:

  • Participated and presented in the Inaugural “Women Like You” Symposium.
  • Collaborated, planned, facilitated and participated in the campus-wide Tipping Point- Student Success Summit.
  • Presented a workshop to the Inclusive Teaching Academy for faculty development on inclusive learning and teaching.
  • Participated in the Asian Pacific Islander Diversity Summit.
  • EOP Interns programmed a fall cultural event for CSUC students to participate in the annual Dia de los Muertos Altar.
  • Presented and participated in PAUSE 2019—workshop presentation on API data.
  • Women of Excellence (WOE) initiated focus groups to establish a female counterpart to Men of Chico.
  • Presented to Men of Chico on diversity, equity, stereotypes, threats and biases.

III. Changes in policies and procedures

Summer Bridge – Summer Bridge 2019 successfully implemented for a second year the use of technology to help meet students’ academic needs. Initiated the use of both Remind and GroupMe apps to communicate with students during Summer Bridge and continue their use during the academic year.

IV. Resources summary

Resource Allocation

Budget allocation for 2018-2019 (no rollover from 2017-2018) 

$1,106,043
Other one-time dollars/reimbursements$51,970
Work Study allocation for 2018-2019 (EOP only)  $47,600
Total allocation$1,205,613
Funds transferred to FYP($3,445)
Projected Annual Expense($941,643)
Unused Work Study ($10)
Annual Expense – Summer Bridge (2018) ($135,850)
Projected Balance$124,668
Encumbered funds for 2019-202091,448
Actual remaining funds33,220

Note: EOP received base funding dollars for an SSP II position in 2018-2019. EOP is in the process of hiring this position during the summer. The remaining encumbered funds are for one-time projects that did not get spent in the 2018-2019 fiscal year.

Human Resources

  • Cecilia Santillan-Robles applied for and was hired as the Early Outreach and Support Programs (EOSP) Director in March 2019, therefore leaving her EOP Associate Director position vacant. Vikki Bass applied for and was hired as the new EOP Associate Director in June 2019.
  • Currently in the hiring process for an Admissions Specialist (SSPII).
  • Due to continued increase in the number of completed applications and in order to meet the Admissions and Financial Aid timelines, EOP hired a special consultant in the spring to assist in reviewing admission files.

Facilities/Equipment

  • Reserving rooms (especially large capacity rooms) and computer labs for Summer Bridge continues to be a challenge.
  • The procedure of unlocking reserved rooms consistently and in a timely fashion continues to be a challenge.

V. Program Assessment of Past Year

Program Objectives for 2018-2019

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.
    Ongoing – EOP Advisors and Interns focused on reaching out to EOP students on AP to meet with them on a regular basis to develop a plan of action for getting off of AP.
  1. Increase contact and support of continuing students who are in good academic standing.
    Ongoing – EOP will increase intentional contact to all good academic standing students and offer programming to support their success. 
  1. Enhance support for our first year students through communication via electronic technology.
    Met/Ongoing – EOP established use of two apps – REMIND and GroupMe to offer a mechanism to share information and send out reminders. These methods have proven to be effective in delivering our messaging to our students.
  1. Focus on professional development and career readiness for our continuing EOP students.
    Ongoing – EOP has initiated more intentional collaboration with the Career Center. We will include language in our second year success contract to ensure students will meet with the Career Center and develop workshops focused on our students.
  1. As a result of current staffing re-assignments, assess workloads and productivity and reorganize accordingly.
    Ongoing– EOP continues to adjust to the transitions that have occurred with the unit’s promotions and new members. Ongoing meetings to communicate transitions and expectations will help foster a smoother transition.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts:

Breakdown by Admissions Category: EOP Bona Fide Enrolled (Primary Goals 1 and 2)

Admissions Category

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

Freshmen Exception

32

44

65

37

23

Freshmen Regular

179

171

126

156

171

Transfer Exception

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular

55

49

63

54

0

Transfer Regular “S”

0

0

0

0

0

Total

266

264

254

247

194

Breakdown by Admissions Category: Non-Bona Fide EOP Enrolled (Primary Goal 1 and 2)

Admissions Category

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

Freshmen Exception

0

0

2

1

0

Freshmen Regular

2

0

4

1

71

Transfer Exception

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular “S”

0

0

0

0

0

Total

2

0

6

2

71

EOP Ethnicity Of Enrolled Admits – Fall Semesters (Primary Goal 2)

 

Fall 2014

 

Fall 2015

 

Fall 2016

 

Fall 2017

Fall 2018   

Ethnicity

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

African American

10

21

7

19

11

16

7

27

10

22

American Indian

0

1

0

3

0

2

0

2

0

4

Asian American

4

39

6

38

3

31

2

42

0

28

Filipino

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Mexican American

16

137

29

138

48

109

27

100

9

98

Other Latino

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Pacific Islander

0

1

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

1

Unknown

0

3

1

0

0

4

0

5

2

60

White/Non-Latino

0

29

1

17

1

21

2

25

1

19

2 or More Ethnicities

2

14

0

5

2

9

0

10

1

10

Total

32

245

44

220

67

193

38

211

23

242

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)


Cohort: Fall 2013

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2013

211

Spring 2014

208

97%

Fall 2014

195

92%

Spring 2015

191

91%

Fall 2015

176

83%

Spring 2016

174

82%

Fall 2016

162

77%

Spring 2017

159

75%

Fall 2017

139

66%

Spring 2018

114

54%

Fall 2018

60

28%

Spring 2019

36

17%

Cohort: Fall 2014

Cohort: Fall 2014

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2014

214

Spring 2015

210

98%

Fall 2015

195

91%

Spring 2016

190

89%

Fall 2016

175

82%

Spring 2017

173

81%

Fall 2017

160

75%

Spring 2018

160

75%

Fall 2018

118

55%

Spring 2019

85

40%

Cohort: Fall 2015

Cohort: Fall 2015

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2015

216

Spring 2016

214

99%

Fall 2016

191

88%

Spring 2017

186

86%

Fall 2017

173

80%

Spring 2018

161

75%

Fall 2018

155

72%

Spring 2019

155

72%

Cohort: Fall 2016

Cohort: Fall 2016

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2016

195

Spring 2017

189

97%

Fall 2017

174

89%

Spring 2018

165

85%

Fall 2018

146

75%

Spring 2019

146

75%

Cohort: Fall 2017

Cohort: Fall 2017

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2017

195

Spring 2018

190

97%

Fall 2018

176

90%

Spring 2019

168

86%

Cohort: Fall 2018

Cohort: Fall 2018

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2018

195

Spring 2019

186

95%

4- and 6-year Graduation Rates (Primary Goal 1)

Fall Semester

Cohort

Percent of Cohort Graduating

Count

4 Year Grad Total

4 Year Grad %

6 Year Grad Total

6 Year Grad %

1995

175

9

5%

39

22%

1996

188

2

1%

45

24%

1997

180

11

6%

58

32%

1998

203

10

5%

61

30%

1999

220

18

8%

77

35%

2000

170

3

2%

56

33%

2001

200

10

5%

68

34%

2002

211

11

5%

63

30%

2003

197

12

6%

87

44%

2004

160

13

8%

74

46%

2005

211

15

7%

99

47%

2006

214

17

8%

103

48%

2007

173

7

4%

62

36%

2008

200

6

3%

94

47%

2009

228

25

11%

123

54%

2010

215

15

7%

144

67%

2011

237

14

6%

138 

58% 

2012

219

33

15%

119 

54% 

2013

211

22

10%

127

60%

2014

213

36

17%

2015

215

32

15%

Note: This is a new table for Graduation Initiative purposes.

EOP Total Student Enrollment Ethnicity (Primary Goal 2)

Ethnicity

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

    Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

African American

93

97

100

116

127

American Indian

13

14

9

12

11

Asian American

263

235

204

193

172

Filipino

0

0

0

0

0

Mexican American

691

703

686

666

591

Other Latino

7

2

0

0

0

Pacific Islander

4

2

5

5

3

Unknown

18

16

1

1

76

White\Non-Latino

123

107

98

101

96

2 or More Ethnicities*

47

44

38

32

39

Total

1259

1220

1141

1126

1115

Total EOP Students by GPA (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%
         #            %

3.5 +

152

13

105

9

124

14

124

14

       121          14

3.0 to 3.49

290

25

289

24

224

25

224

25

204          24

2.5 to 2.99

352

30

380

32

283

31

283

31

282          33

2.0 to 2.49

270

23

327

27

235

26

235

26

289          22

1.99 & below

95

8

93

8

51

6

51

6

56            7

Total

1159

100

1192

100

917

100

917

100

852        100

2.0 or better

 

92

 

92

 

94

 

94

              93

Educational Opportunity ProgramI. Mission Statement

The mission of the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) is to provide access and support services to first-generation college students who have experienced economic, educational, and/or environmental barriers, but display the potential to succeed in post-secondary education and to assist the university in the matriculation, retention, and graduation of EOP students.

Department Goals (Last reviewed July 2019):

  1. EOP will provide a comprehensive program of support services that will enhance the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary for the academic success and the social and emotional personal development of EOP students. (Division goals 1, 2, 3; University strategic priorities 1, 3)
  2. EOP will promote social, cultural, and ethnic diversity in the CSU, Chico campus population. (Division goal 2; University strategic priorities 4, 7, 8)
  3. EOP will educate and inform students, faculty, and staff about program services and accomplishments. (Division goal 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 2, 4, 5, 8)
  4. EOP professional staff will maintain currency in the fields of college student retention, academic advising and obstacles encountered by first-generation and other historically marginalized college students through memberships in professional organizations, reading appropriate research journals, and professional development opportunities. (Division goals 1, 2; 3; University strategic priorities 2, 4, 5, 8)
  5. EOP will encourage student participation and involvement in the CSU, Chico campus community and the community of Chico as a whole. (Division goals 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 4, 6, 7, 8)

II. Department Accomplishments

  • EOP 50th anniversary events--Kick-off event focused on current students.
  • Summer Bridge English Component created EOP 50th webpage.
  • Highest number of participation for the annual Graduate Diversity Forum.
  • Successful campus collaboration for the first campus wide Tipping Point Summit.
  • Diversity Art Exhibit raised funding for donations to CAMP fire survivors.

Highlights:

  • EOP 50th anniversary events—kick-off event focused on current students.
    EOP commenced the celebrations of our 50th anniversary. In the spring 2019, we hosted our current students and campus alumni to enjoy a short program, cake and promotional stickers to mark this kick-off event. A more formal affair with take place this upcoming fall.
  • Highest number of participation for the annual Graduate Diversity Forum
    EOP coordinates the North State California Forum for Diversity in Graduate Education. In 2017, 41 students signed up and only 30 attended the event at UC Merced.  In 2018, 46 students signed up and 36 students attended. In 2019, 46 signed up to participate. 39 students attended the event and an additional 18 students drove themselves to UC Davis for a grand total of 57 participants.
  • Successful campus collaboration for the first campus wide Tipping Point Summit
    On January 17, 2019 the divisions of Student Affairs and Academic Affairs hosted a campus wide    Student Success Summit. Two EOSP employees were part of the planning committee. One of them co-presented.

Diversity Efforts:

  • Participated and presented in the Inaugural “Women Like You” Symposium.
  • Collaborated, planned, facilitated and participated in the campus-wide Tipping Point- Student Success Summit.
  • Presented a workshop to the Inclusive Teaching Academy for faculty development on inclusive learning and teaching.
  • Participated in the Asian Pacific Islander Diversity Summit.
  • EOP Interns programmed a fall cultural event for CSUC students to participate in the annual Dia de los Muertos Altar.
  • Presented and participated in PAUSE 2019—workshop presentation on API data.
  • Women of Excellence (WOE) initiated focus groups to establish a female counterpart to Men of Chico.
  • Presented to Men of Chico on diversity, equity, stereotypes, threats and biases.

III. Changes in policies and procedures

Summer Bridge – Summer Bridge 2019 successfully implemented for a second year the use of technology to help meet students’ academic needs. Initiated the use of both Remind and GroupMe apps to communicate with students during Summer Bridge and continue their use during the academic year.

IV. Resources summary

EOP FTF Students by GPA* (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%
#             %
#             %

3.5 +

26

12

42

20

23

12

33           17

45           24

3.0 to 3.49

43

20

56

27

34

18

44           23

59           32

2.5 to 2.99

73

35

45

21

65

35

48           25

39           21

2.0 to 2.49

33

16

38

18

36

19

33           17

28           15

1.99 & below

35

17

30

14

28

15

31           16

15           8

Total

210

100

211

100

186

100

    189         100

    186         100

2.0 or better

 

83

 

86

 

85

              84

              92

Resource Allocation

Budget allocation for 2018-2019 (no rollover from 2017-2018) 

$1,106,043
Other one-time dollars/reimbursements$51,970
Work Study allocation for 2018-2019 (EOP only)  $47,600
Total allocation$1,205,613
Funds transferred to FYP($3,445)
Projected Annual Expense($941,643)
Unused Work Study ($10)
Annual Expense – Summer Bridge (2018) ($135,850)
Projected Balance$124,668
Encumbered funds for 2019-202091,448
Actual remaining funds33,220

Note: EOP received base funding dollars for an SSP II position in 2018-2019. EOP is in the process of hiring this position during the summer. The remaining encumbered funds are for one-time projects that did not get spent in the 2018-2019 fiscal year.

Human Resources

  • Cecilia Santillan-Robles applied for and was hired as the Early Outreach and Support Programs (EOSP) Director in March 2019, therefore leaving her EOP Associate Director position vacant. Vikki Bass applied for and was hired as the new EOP Associate Director in June 2019.
  • Currently in the hiring process for an Admissions Specialist (SSPII).
  • Due to continued increase in the number of completed applications and in order to meet the Admissions and Financial Aid timelines, EOP hired a special consultant in the spring to assist in reviewing admission files.

Facilities/Equipment

  • Reserving rooms (especially large capacity rooms) and computer labs for Summer Bridge continues to be a challenge.
  • The procedure of unlocking reserved rooms consistently and in a timely fashion continues to be a challenge.

V. Program Assessment of Past Year

Program Objectives for 2018-2019

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.
    Ongoing – EOP Advisors and Interns focused on reaching out to EOP students on AP to meet with them on a regular basis to develop a plan of action for getting off of AP.
  1. Increase contact and support of continuing students who are in good academic standing.
    Ongoing – EOP will increase intentional contact to all good academic standing students and offer programming to support their success. 
  1. Enhance support for our first year students through communication via electronic technology.
    Met/Ongoing – EOP established use of two apps – REMIND and GroupMe to offer a mechanism to share information and send out reminders. These methods have proven to be effective in delivering our messaging to our students.
  1. Focus on professional development and career readiness for our continuing EOP students.
    Ongoing – EOP has initiated more intentional collaboration with the Career Center. We will include language in our second year success contract to ensure students will meet with the Career Center and develop workshops focused on our students.
  1. As a result of current staffing re-assignments, assess workloads and productivity and reorganize accordingly.
    Ongoing– EOP continues to adjust to the transitions that have occurred with the unit’s promotions and new members. Ongoing meetings to communicate transitions and expectations will help foster a smoother transition.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts:

Breakdown by Admissions Category: EOP Bona Fide Enrolled (Primary Goals 1 and 2)

Admissions Category

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

Freshmen Exception

32

44

65

37

23

Freshmen Regular

179

171

126

156

171

Transfer Exception

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular

55

49

63

54

0

Transfer Regular “S”

0

0

0

0

0

Total

266

264

254

247

194

Breakdown by Admissions Category: Non-Bona Fide EOP Enrolled (Primary Goal 1 and 2)

Admissions Category

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

Freshmen Exception

0

0

2

1

0

Freshmen Regular

2

0

4

1

71

Transfer Exception

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular “S”

0

0

0

0

0

Total

2

0

6

2

71

EOP Ethnicity Of Enrolled Admits – Fall Semesters (Primary Goal 2)

 

Fall 2014

 

Fall 2015

 

Fall 2016

 

Fall 2017

Fall 2018   

Ethnicity

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

African American

10

21

7

19

11

16

7

27

10

22

American Indian

0

1

0

3

0

2

0

2

0

4

Asian American

4

39

6

38

3

31

2

42

0

28

Filipino

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Mexican American

16

137

29

138

48

109

27

100

9

98

Other Latino

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Pacific Islander

0

1

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

1

Unknown

0

3

1

0

0

4

0

5

2

60

White/Non-Latino

0

29

1

17

1

21

2

25

1

19

2 or More Ethnicities

2

14

0

5

2

9

0

10

1

10

Total

32

245

44

220

67

193

38

211

23

242

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)


Cohort: Fall 2013

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2013

211

Spring 2014

208

97%

Fall 2014

195

92%

Spring 2015

191

91%

Fall 2015

176

83%

Spring 2016

174

82%

Fall 2016

162

77%

Spring 2017

159

75%

Fall 2017

139

66%

Spring 2018

114

54%

Fall 2018

60

28%

Spring 2019

36

17%

Cohort: Fall 2014

Cohort: Fall 2014

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2014

214

Spring 2015

210

98%

Fall 2015

195

91%

Spring 2016

190

89%

Fall 2016

175

82%

Spring 2017

173

81%

Fall 2017

160

75%

Spring 2018

160

75%

Fall 2018

118

55%

Spring 2019

85

40%

Cohort: Fall 2015

Cohort: Fall 2015

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2015

216

Spring 2016

214

99%

Fall 2016

191

88%

Spring 2017

186

86%

Fall 2017

173

80%

Spring 2018

161

75%

Fall 2018

155

72%

Spring 2019

155

72%

Cohort: Fall 2016

Cohort: Fall 2016

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2016

195

Spring 2017

189

97%

Fall 2017

174

89%

Spring 2018

165

85%

Fall 2018

146

75%

Spring 2019

146

75%

Cohort: Fall 2017

Cohort: Fall 2017

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2017

195

Spring 2018

190

97%

Fall 2018

176

90%

Spring 2019

168

86%

Cohort: Fall 2018

Cohort: Fall 2018

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2018

195

Spring 2019

186

95%

4- and 6-year Graduation Rates (Primary Goal 1)

Fall Semester

Cohort

Percent of Cohort Graduating

Count

4 Year Grad Total

4 Year Grad %

6 Year Grad Total

6 Year Grad %

1995

175

9

5%

39

22%

1996

188

2

1%

45

24%

1997

180

11

6%

58

32%

1998

203

10

5%

61

30%

1999

220

18

8%

77

35%

2000

170

3

2%

56

33%

2001

200

10

5%

68

34%

2002

211

11

5%

63

30%

2003

197

12

6%

87

44%

2004

160

13

8%

74

46%

2005

211

15

7%

99

47%

2006

214

17

8%

103

48%

2007

173

7

4%

62

36%

2008

200

6

3%

94

47%

2009

228

25

11%

123

54%

2010

215

15

7%

144

67%

2011

237

14

6%

138 

58% 

2012

219

33

15%

119 

54% 

2013

211

22

10%

127

60%

2014

213

36

17%

2015

215

32

15%

Note: This is a new table for Graduation Initiative purposes.

EOP Total Student Enrollment Ethnicity (Primary Goal 2)

Ethnicity

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

    Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

African American

93

97

100

116

127

American Indian

13

14

9

12

11

Asian American

263

235

204

193

172

Filipino

0

0

0

0

0

Mexican American

691

703

686

666

591

Other Latino

7

2

0

0

0

Pacific Islander

4

2

5

5

3

Unknown

18

16

1

1

76

White\Non-Latino

123

107

98

101

96

2 or More Ethnicities*

47

44

38

32

39

Total

1259

1220

1141

1126

1115

Total EOP Students by GPA (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%
         #            %

3.5 +

152

13

105

9

124

14

124

14

       121          14

3.0 to 3.49

290

25

289

24

224

25

224

25

204          24

2.5 to 2.99

352

30

380

32

283

31

283

31

282          33

2.0 to 2.49

270

23

327

27

235

26

235

26

289          22

1.99 & below

95

8

93

8

51

6

51

6

56            7

Total

1159

100

1192

100

917

100

917

100

852        100

2.0 or better

 

92

 

92

 

94

 

94

              93

EOP FTF Students by GPA* (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%
#             %
#             %

3.5 +

26

12

42

20

23

12

33           17

45           24

3.0 to 3.49

43

20

56

27

34

18

44           23

59           32

2.5 to 2.99

73

35

45

21

65

35

48           25

39           21

2.0 to 2.49

33

16

38

18

36

19

33           17

28           15

1.99 & below

35

17

30

14

28

15

31           16

15           8

Total

210

100

211

100

186

100

    189         100

    186         100

2.0 or better

 

83

 

86

 

85

              84

              92

Total EOP Students by Class Level (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%
#             %
#             %

Freshmen

231

12

227

20

214

19

204           19

195           19

Sophomore

221

20

224

19

211

19

200           19

196           19

Junior

275

35

274

24

282

26

272           25

267           26

Senior

464

16

434

37

396

36

401           37

381           37

Total

1191

1159

1103

   1077      

   1039      

Computer Lab Usage (Primary Goal 1)

Total Students that used Computer Lab at Least Once

Total EOP Students

Total Percentage

Fall 2012

749

1207

62.05

Spring 2013

668

1175

56.85

Fall 2013

769

1254

61.32

Spring 2014

740

1204

61.46

Fall 2014

859

1273

67.48

Spring 2015*

0

0

0.00

Fall 2015

744

1220

60.98

Spring 2016

775

1159

66.87

Fall 2016

736

1151

63.94

Spring 2017

672

1099

61.15

Fall 2017**

0

1150

0.00

Spring 2018

746

1090

68.44

Fall 2018

913

1130

80.80

Spring 2019

968

1049

92.28

*Note: During the Spring 2015 semester, our lab check in system data got corrupted in the Cbord database. We had to replace the check in system and lost all of the data associated with that semester. **During the fall 2017 semester, the lab check in machine broke. The check in system had to be replaced and all of the data associated with the fall semester was lost.

Student Learning Outcomes

SLO #1 – As a result of participating in the English “Stretch Model”, students should be able to successfully pass ENGL 130. - This is the ninth year that ENGL 130 was moved to the spring semester. English faculty collaborated with the campus FYE program to create an English “stretch” model for students enrolled in the EOP Course Link for the fall and spring semesters. This past year, 98% of our first-year students passed ENGL 130 on their first attempt.

SLO #2 – As a result of participating in the “Reality Check 101” series, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first semester - EOP staff are constantly looking for ways to provide earlier intervention for students having academic difficulty. During the fall semester, students receiving two or more negative progress reports (C- or below), or were referred by their paraprofessional, had a negative service indicator (NSI) placed on their accounts. The NSI was not released until they attended a “Reality Check” workshop or made special arrangements. Nineteen students were required to attend the “Reality Check” workshop during the fall 2018 semester. This one-hour workshop, facilitated by EOP Advisors, was held in the fall and designed to strengthen academic performance and avoid academic probation at the end of the semester. Some of the workshop activities included:

  • Helping students reflect on their academic performance
  • Identifying challenges or obstacles, on and off campus, from fall semester
  • Discussing academic probation (Chico or cumulative GPA below 2.0)
  • Discussing reality of disqualification (Chico or cumulative GPA below 1.5 for students with less than 30 units)
  • Goal setting by identifying three things the students will change to enhance their engagement and academic achievement.

Of the 19 students required to attend “Reality Check”, 19 completed the workshop or attended an individual meeting. Ten (52.7%) avoided academic probation; 9 (47.3%) finished the fall 2018 semester on academic probation.

SLO #3 – As a result of participating in “Fresh Start”, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first year. – EOP first-year students with a GPA below a 2.0 after their first semester are required to attend a series of workshops called “Fresh Start” in the spring. (This program was also extended to PATH Scholar first-year participants, however, the results below are only applicable to EOP students). The purpose of “Fresh Start” is to present a structured set of workshops that provide students on academic probation university policy information and an opportunity to explore social and emotional learning (SEL) so they can clear their academic standing with the university as well as increase their understanding of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills and decision making, and how they inform their academics. Ninety-minute workshops were held for five weeks and facilitated by EOP Advisors and Paraprofessional Advisors. Workshop activities included:

Week 1 – Reflection – How did I get here? /AP and DQ information, Social Emotional Learning and Community Cultural Wealth
Week 2 – Personality Assessment, Growth Mindset, Grit, What is success to you?
Week 3 – Challenges and Obstacles, Values, Attributes and Shortcomings – Navigating Campus Resources, Academic/Classroom Strategies
Week 4 – Skills to Enhance Learning
Week 5 – Goal Setting

In spring 2019, 25 first-year students out of 195 were required to attend “Fresh Start”. This was 12.8% of first year students (compared to 23% in spring 2018, 23% in spring 2017, 16% in spring 2016, 12.1% in spring 2015, 15% in spring 2014, 11.4% in spring 2013; and 13% in spring 2012). Nine (42%) ended the semester in good academic standing (Chico GPA above 2.0), 4 (19%) improved yet remain on academic probation, 1 (4.7%) students improved but are in DQ range, while 4 (19%) students’ GPA’s declined and are in DQ range. In addition, 2 (9.5%) students improved their Chico GPA’s and were offered academic contracts through Academic Advising Programs. One was an Institutional Contract and the other a Special Contract.  Overall, 16 (76%) of the students improved their GPA.

*Averages for Fresh Start 2019 are based on 21 total students, as four of the 25 required to attend did not enroll for the spring semester.

SLO #4 – As a result of participating in the Expanded Summer Bridge program, students requiring math remediation will either score high enough on the ELM to move up to the next level of math or satisfy the Early Start remedial math requirement completely. – In Summer 2018, EO665 was replaced with EO1110 which meant we no longer have the ELM or EPT for students to test on. EO 1110 focuses on multiple measures to place students in their respective English and math level. We now focus on students satisfying early start by taking a math and English component during Summer Bridge.

VI. Analysis

  • We need to continue to work with the entire team to help with transitions of new roles. The EOSP Director has been in a new position for only 2 months. The EOP Associate Director has been in her role for only one month. We need to organize to ensure appropriate workload and productivity. We are in the process of hiring an Admissions Specialist to start in the fall.
  • Continue to review program analysis and outcomes to align with GI 2025.
  • Since we are down an EOP Advisor, we are seeking a graduate intern to help with some of the projects and academic advising during drop-in times. This will alleviate some of the workload of the remaining staff.
  • Because of our lower incoming class numbers, EOP had to reduce one section of the Course Link offered to all incoming EOP first-time freshmen. These sections foster a sense of community and belonging and hopefully enhance our persistence rates.
  • EOP will need to readjust the number of seats we ask for in our Course Link sections as more students enter with college level credit coursework completed.
  • EOP has a commitment to the original ideals of the program. We will need to continue to maximize efforts to prioritize our exceptional admit pool.
  • Our EOP admissions process needs to keep pace with Admissions and Financial Aid timelines. Hiring supplemental assistance this past cycle was instrumental in meeting these deadlines. We will continue to look for ways to shorten the amount of time it takes to review files.
  • We need to continue to provide more resources for our second-year students. They will continue to work closely with our student intern staff, and utilize some of the components from our EOP/FYE model. Our Second Year Success Program will continue to need additional resources to focus on social activities and programming.
  • We need to focus more on life-after-college preparation for our students.
  • We need to continue to be more intentional about educating the campus community on who our students are and the services we provide.
  • As changes in remediation are implemented throughout the CSU system, we will need to anticipate how this will impact Summer Bridge and our first-time freshmen.
  • The Summer Bridge format needs to be evaluated now that we have implemented EO 1110 and there is no more assessments (ELM) to be given.
  • With the continued increase in first-generation college students and our program at capacity, we need to work with campus partners to find ways to serve more students overall.
  • EOP implemented various assessments of the first-year students to get a better understanding of how they feel about being a college student, support they have received and thoughts of their future. We collect data from four electronic surveys: Summer Bridge Assessment, Early-First-Semester Survey, End-of-First-Semester Survey, and End-of-First-Year Survey. Data from all surveys indicate a majority of students are feeling confident, positive, and supported through EOP’s efforts. Peer mentors (Summer Bridge Resident Advisors and Paraprofessionals) receive the highest praise, while the fall and spring course links, EOP staff and Summer Bridge Mentors are also held in high regard.

VII. Program Objectives For 2019-2020

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.
  2. Enhance contact and support of continuing students who are in good academic standing.
  3. Increase support for our first-year and second-year students through communication via electronic technology.
  4. Implement professional development and career readiness for our continuing EOP students.
  5. As a result of current staffing re-assignments, assess workloads and productivity and reorganize accordingly.
Educational Opportunity ProgramI. Mission Statement

The mission of the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) is to provide access and support services to first-generation college students who have experienced economic, educational, and/or environmental barriers, but display the potential to succeed in post-secondary education and to assist the university in the matriculation, retention, and graduation of EOP students.

Department Goals (Last reviewed July 2019):

  1. EOP will provide a comprehensive program of support services that will enhance the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary for the academic success and the social and emotional personal development of EOP students. (Division goals 1, 2, 3; University strategic priorities 1, 3)
  2. EOP will promote social, cultural, and ethnic diversity in the CSU, Chico campus population. (Division goal 2; University strategic priorities 4, 7, 8)
  3. EOP will educate and inform students, faculty, and staff about program services and accomplishments. (Division goal 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 2, 4, 5, 8)
  4. EOP professional staff will maintain currency in the fields of college student retention, academic advising and obstacles encountered by first-generation and other historically marginalized college students through memberships in professional organizations, reading appropriate research journals, and professional development opportunities. (Division goals 1, 2; 3; University strategic priorities 2, 4, 5, 8)
  5. EOP will encourage student participation and involvement in the CSU, Chico campus community and the community of Chico as a whole. (Division goals 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 4, 6, 7, 8)

II. Department Accomplishments

  • EOP 50th anniversary events--Kick-off event focused on current students.
  • Summer Bridge English Component created EOP 50th webpage.
  • Highest number of participation for the annual Graduate Diversity Forum.
  • Successful campus collaboration for the first campus wide Tipping Point Summit.
  • Diversity Art Exhibit raised funding for donations to CAMP fire survivors.

Highlights:

  • EOP 50th anniversary events—kick-off event focused on current students.
    EOP commenced the celebrations of our 50th anniversary. In the spring 2019, we hosted our current students and campus alumni to enjoy a short program, cake and promotional stickers to mark this kick-off event. A more formal affair with take place this upcoming fall.
  • Highest number of participation for the annual Graduate Diversity Forum
    EOP coordinates the North State California Forum for Diversity in Graduate Education. In 2017, 41 students signed up and only 30 attended the event at UC Merced.  In 2018, 46 students signed up and 36 students attended. In 2019, 46 signed up to participate. 39 students attended the event and an additional 18 students drove themselves to UC Davis for a grand total of 57 participants.
  • Successful campus collaboration for the first campus wide Tipping Point Summit
    On January 17, 2019 the divisions of Student Affairs and Academic Affairs hosted a campus wide    Student Success Summit. Two EOSP employees were part of the planning committee. One of them co-presented.

Diversity Efforts:

  • Participated and presented in the Inaugural “Women Like You” Symposium.
  • Collaborated, planned, facilitated and participated in the campus-wide Tipping Point- Student Success Summit.
  • Presented a workshop to the Inclusive Teaching Academy for faculty development on inclusive learning and teaching.
  • Participated in the Asian Pacific Islander Diversity Summit.
  • EOP Interns programmed a fall cultural event for CSUC students to participate in the annual Dia de los Muertos Altar.
  • Presented and participated in PAUSE 2019—workshop presentation on API data.
  • Women of Excellence (WOE) initiated focus groups to establish a female counterpart to Men of Chico.
  • Presented to Men of Chico on diversity, equity, stereotypes, threats and biases.

III. Changes in policies and procedures

Summer Bridge – Summer Bridge 2019 successfully implemented for a second year the use of technology to help meet students’ academic needs. Initiated the use of both Remind and GroupMe apps to communicate with students during Summer Bridge and continue their use during the academic year.

IV. Resources summary

Resource Allocation

Budget allocation for 2018-2019 (no rollover from 2017-2018) 

$1,106,043
Other one-time dollars/reimbursements$51,970
Work Study allocation for 2018-2019 (EOP only)  $47,600
Total allocation$1,205,613
Funds transferred to FYP($3,445)
Projected Annual Expense($941,643)
Unused Work Study ($10)
Annual Expense – Summer Bridge (2018) ($135,850)
Projected Balance$124,668
Encumbered funds for 2019-202091,448
Actual remaining funds33,220

Note: EOP received base funding dollars for an SSP II position in 2018-2019. EOP is in the process of hiring this position during the summer. The remaining encumbered funds are for one-time projects that did not get spent in the 2018-2019 fiscal year.

Human Resources

  • Cecilia Santillan-Robles applied for and was hired as the Early Outreach and Support Programs (EOSP) Director in March 2019, therefore leaving her EOP Associate Director position vacant. Vikki Bass applied for and was hired as the new EOP Associate Director in June 2019.
  • Currently in the hiring process for an Admissions Specialist (SSPII).
  • Due to continued increase in the number of completed applications and in order to meet the Admissions and Financial Aid timelines, EOP hired a special consultant in the spring to assist in reviewing admission files.

Facilities/Equipment

  • Reserving rooms (especially large capacity rooms) and computer labs for Summer Bridge continues to be a challenge.
  • The procedure of unlocking reserved rooms consistently and in a timely fashion continues to be a challenge.

V. Program Assessment of Past Year

Program Objectives for 2018-2019

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.
    Ongoing – EOP Advisors and Interns focused on reaching out to EOP students on AP to meet with them on a regular basis to develop a plan of action for getting off of AP.
  1. Increase contact and support of continuing students who are in good academic standing.
    Ongoing – EOP will increase intentional contact to all good academic standing students and offer programming to support their success. 
  1. Enhance support for our first year students through communication via electronic technology.
    Met/Ongoing – EOP established use of two apps – REMIND and GroupMe to offer a mechanism to share information and send out reminders. These methods have proven to be effective in delivering our messaging to our students.
  1. Focus on professional development and career readiness for our continuing EOP students.
    Ongoing – EOP has initiated more intentional collaboration with the Career Center. We will include language in our second year success contract to ensure students will meet with the Career Center and develop workshops focused on our students.
  1. As a result of current staffing re-assignments, assess workloads and productivity and reorganize accordingly.
    Ongoing– EOP continues to adjust to the transitions that have occurred with the unit’s promotions and new members. Ongoing meetings to communicate transitions and expectations will help foster a smoother transition.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts:

Breakdown by Admissions Category: EOP Bona Fide Enrolled (Primary Goals 1 and 2)

Admissions Category

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

Freshmen Exception

32

44

65

37

23

Freshmen Regular

179

171

126

156

171

Transfer Exception

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular

55

49

63

54

0

Transfer Regular “S”

0

0

0

0

0

Total

266

264

254

247

194

Breakdown by Admissions Category: Non-Bona Fide EOP Enrolled (Primary Goal 1 and 2)

Admissions Category

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

Freshmen Exception

0

0

2

1

0

Freshmen Regular

2

0

4

1

71

Transfer Exception

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular “S”

0

0

0

0

0

Total

2

0

6

2

71

EOP Ethnicity Of Enrolled Admits – Fall Semesters (Primary Goal 2)

 

Fall 2014

 

Fall 2015

 

Fall 2016

 

Fall 2017

Fall 2018   

Ethnicity

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

African American

10

21

7

19

11

16

7

27

10

22

American Indian

0

1

0

3

0

2

0

2

0

4

Asian American

4

39

6

38

3

31

2

42

0

28

Filipino

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Mexican American

16

137

29

138

48

109

27

100

9

98

Other Latino

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Pacific Islander

0

1

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

1

Unknown

0

3

1

0

0

4

0

5

2

60

White/Non-Latino

0

29

1

17

1

21

2

25

1

19

2 or More Ethnicities

2

14

0

5

2

9

0

10

1

10

Total

32

245

44

220

67

193

38

211

23

242

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)


Cohort: Fall 2013

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2013

211

Spring 2014

208

97%

Fall 2014

195

92%

Spring 2015

191

91%

Fall 2015

176

83%

Spring 2016

174

82%

Fall 2016

162

77%

Spring 2017

159

75%

Fall 2017

139

66%

Spring 2018

114

54%

Fall 2018

60

28%

Spring 2019

36

17%

Cohort: Fall 2014

Cohort: Fall 2014

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2014

214

Spring 2015

210

98%

Fall 2015

195

91%

Spring 2016

190

89%

Fall 2016

175

82%

Spring 2017

173

81%

Fall 2017

160

75%

Spring 2018

160

75%

Fall 2018

118

55%

Spring 2019

85

40%

Cohort: Fall 2015

Cohort: Fall 2015

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2015

216

Spring 2016

214

99%

Fall 2016

191

88%

Spring 2017

186

86%

Fall 2017

173

80%

Spring 2018

161

75%

Fall 2018

155

72%

Spring 2019

155

72%

Cohort: Fall 2016

Cohort: Fall 2016

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2016

195

Spring 2017

189

97%

Fall 2017

174

89%

Spring 2018

165

85%

Fall 2018

146

75%

Spring 2019

146

75%

Cohort: Fall 2017

Cohort: Fall 2017

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2017

195

Spring 2018

190

97%

Fall 2018

176

90%

Spring 2019

168

86%

Cohort: Fall 2018

Cohort: Fall 2018

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2018

195

Spring 2019

186

95%

4- and 6-year Graduation Rates (Primary Goal 1)

Fall Semester

Cohort

Percent of Cohort Graduating

Count

4 Year Grad Total

4 Year Grad %

6 Year Grad Total

6 Year Grad %

1995

175

9

5%

39

22%

1996

188

2

1%

45

24%

1997

180

11

6%

58

32%

1998

203

10

5%

61

30%

1999

220

18

8%

77

35%

2000

170

3

2%

56

33%

2001

200

10

5%

68

34%

2002

211

11

5%

63

30%

2003

197

12

6%

87

44%

2004

160

13

8%

74

46%

2005

211

15

7%

99

47%

2006

214

17

8%

103

48%

2007

173

7

4%

62

36%

2008

200

6

3%

94

47%

2009

228

25

11%

123

54%

2010

215

15

7%

144

67%

2011

237

14

6%

138 

58% 

2012

219

33

15%

119 

54% 

2013

211

22

10%

127

60%

2014

213

36

17%

2015

215

32

15%

Note: This is a new table for Graduation Initiative purposes.

EOP Total Student Enrollment Ethnicity (Primary Goal 2)

Ethnicity

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

    Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

African American

93

97

100

116

127

American Indian

13

14

9

12

11

Asian American

263

235

204

193

172

Filipino

0

0

0

0

0

Mexican American

691

703

686

666

591

Other Latino

7

2

0

0

0

Pacific Islander

4

2

5

5

3

Unknown

18

16

1

1

76

White\Non-Latino

123

107

98

101

96

2 or More Ethnicities*

47

44

38

32

39

Total

1259

1220

1141

1126

1115

Total EOP Students by GPA (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%
         #            %

3.5 +

152

13

105

9

124

14

124

14

       121          14

3.0 to 3.49

290

25

289

24

224

25

224

25

204          24

2.5 to 2.99

352

30

380

32

283

31

283

31

282          33

2.0 to 2.49

270

23

327

27

235

26

235

26

289          22

1.99 & below

95

8

93

8

51

6

51

6

56            7

Total

1159

100

1192

100

917

100

917

100

852        100

2.0 or better

 

92

 

92

 

94

 

94

              93

EOP FTF Students by GPA* (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%
#             %
#             %

3.5 +

26

12

42

20

23

12

33           17

45           24

3.0 to 3.49

43

20

56

27

34

18

44           23

59           32

2.5 to 2.99

73

35

45

21

65

35

48           25

39           21

2.0 to 2.49

33

16

38

18

36

19

33           17

28           15

1.99 & below

35

17

30

14

28

15

31           16

15           8

Total

210

100

211

100

186

100

    189         100

    186         100

2.0 or better

 

83

 

86

 

85

              84

              92

Total EOP Students by Class Level (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%
#             %
#             %

Freshmen

231

12

227

20

214

19

204           19

195           19

Sophomore

221

20

224

19

211

19

200           19

196           19

Junior

275

35

274

24

282

26

272           25

267           26

Senior

464

16

434

37

396

36

401           37

381           37

Total

1191

1159

1103

   1077      

   1039      

Computer Lab Usage (Primary Goal 1)

Total Students that used Computer Lab at Least Once

Total EOP Students

Total Percentage

Fall 2012

749

1207

62.05

Spring 2013

668

1175

56.85

Fall 2013

769

1254

61.32

Spring 2014

740

1204

61.46

Fall 2014

859

1273

67.48

Spring 2015*

0

0

0.00

Fall 2015

744

1220

60.98

Spring 2016

775

1159

66.87

Fall 2016

736

1151

63.94

Spring 2017

672

1099

61.15

Fall 2017**

0

1150

0.00

Spring 2018

746

1090

68.44

Fall 2018

913

1130

80.80

Spring 2019

968

1049

92.28

*Note: During the Spring 2015 semester, our lab check in system data got corrupted in the Cbord database. We had to replace the check in system and lost all of the data associated with that semester. **During the fall 2017 semester, the lab check in machine broke. The check in system had to be replaced and all of the data associated with the fall semester was lost.

Student Learning Outcomes

SLO #1 – As a result of participating in the English “Stretch Model”, students should be able to successfully pass ENGL 130. - This is the ninth year that ENGL 130 was moved to the spring semester. English faculty collaborated with the campus FYE program to create an English “stretch” model for students enrolled in the EOP Course Link for the fall and spring semesters. This past year, 98% of our first-year students passed ENGL 130 on their first attempt.

SLO #2 – As a result of participating in the “Reality Check 101” series, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first semester - EOP staff are constantly looking for ways to provide earlier intervention for students having academic difficulty. During the fall semester, students receiving two or more negative progress reports (C- or below), or were referred by their paraprofessional, had a negative service indicator (NSI) placed on their accounts. The NSI was not released until they attended a “Reality Check” workshop or made special arrangements. Nineteen students were required to attend the “Reality Check” workshop during the fall 2018 semester. This one-hour workshop, facilitated by EOP Advisors, was held in the fall and designed to strengthen academic performance and avoid academic probation at the end of the semester. Some of the workshop activities included:

  • Helping students reflect on their academic performance
  • Identifying challenges or obstacles, on and off campus, from fall semester
  • Discussing academic probation (Chico or cumulative GPA below 2.0)
  • Discussing reality of disqualification (Chico or cumulative GPA below 1.5 for students with less than 30 units)
  • Goal setting by identifying three things the students will change to enhance their engagement and academic achievement.

Of the 19 students required to attend “Reality Check”, 19 completed the workshop or attended an individual meeting. Ten (52.7%) avoided academic probation; 9 (47.3%) finished the fall 2018 semester on academic probation.

SLO #3 – As a result of participating in “Fresh Start”, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first year. – EOP first-year students with a GPA below a 2.0 after their first semester are required to attend a series of workshops called “Fresh Start” in the spring. (This program was also extended to PATH Scholar first-year participants, however, the results below are only applicable to EOP students). The purpose of “Fresh Start” is to present a structured set of workshops that provide students on academic probation university policy information and an opportunity to explore social and emotional learning (SEL) so they can clear their academic standing with the university as well as increase their understanding of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills and decision making, and how they inform their academics. Ninety-minute workshops were held for five weeks and facilitated by EOP Advisors and Paraprofessional Advisors. Workshop activities included:

Week 1 – Reflection – How did I get here? /AP and DQ information, Social Emotional Learning and Community Cultural Wealth
Week 2 – Personality Assessment, Growth Mindset, Grit, What is success to you?
Week 3 – Challenges and Obstacles, Values, Attributes and Shortcomings – Navigating Campus Resources, Academic/Classroom Strategies
Week 4 – Skills to Enhance Learning
Week 5 – Goal Setting

In spring 2019, 25 first-year students out of 195 were required to attend “Fresh Start”. This was 12.8% of first year students (compared to 23% in spring 2018, 23% in spring 2017, 16% in spring 2016, 12.1% in spring 2015, 15% in spring 2014, 11.4% in spring 2013; and 13% in spring 2012). Nine (42%) ended the semester in good academic standing (Chico GPA above 2.0), 4 (19%) improved yet remain on academic probation, 1 (4.7%) students improved but are in DQ range, while 4 (19%) students’ GPA’s declined and are in DQ range. In addition, 2 (9.5%) students improved their Chico GPA’s and were offered academic contracts through Academic Advising Programs. One was an Institutional Contract and the other a Special Contract.  Overall, 16 (76%) of the students improved their GPA.

*Averages for Fresh Start 2019 are based on 21 total students, as four of the 25 required to attend did not enroll for the spring semester.

SLO #4 – As a result of participating in the Expanded Summer Bridge program, students requiring math remediation will either score high enough on the ELM to move up to the next level of math or satisfy the Early Start remedial math requirement completely. – In Summer 2018, EO665 was replaced with EO1110 which meant we no longer have the ELM or EPT for students to test on. EO 1110 focuses on multiple measures to place students in their respective English and math level. We now focus on students satisfying early start by taking a math and English component during Summer Bridge.

VI. Analysis

  • We need to continue to work with the entire team to help with transitions of new roles. The EOSP Director has been in a new position for only 2 months. The EOP Associate Director has been in her role for only one month. We need to organize to ensure appropriate workload and productivity. We are in the process of hiring an Admissions Specialist to start in the fall.
  • Continue to review program analysis and outcomes to align with GI 2025.
  • Since we are down an EOP Advisor, we are seeking a graduate intern to help with some of the projects and academic advising during drop-in times. This will alleviate some of the workload of the remaining staff.
  • Because of our lower incoming class numbers, EOP had to reduce one section of the Course Link offered to all incoming EOP first-time freshmen. These sections foster a sense of community and belonging and hopefully enhance our persistence rates.
  • EOP will need to readjust the number of seats we ask for in our Course Link sections as more students enter with college level credit coursework completed.
  • EOP has a commitment to the original ideals of the program. We will need to continue to maximize efforts to prioritize our exceptional admit pool.
  • Our EOP admissions process needs to keep pace with Admissions and Financial Aid timelines. Hiring supplemental assistance this past cycle was instrumental in meeting these deadlines. We will continue to look for ways to shorten the amount of time it takes to review files.
  • We need to continue to provide more resources for our second-year students. They will continue to work closely with our student intern staff, and utilize some of the components from our EOP/FYE model. Our Second Year Success Program will continue to need additional resources to focus on social activities and programming.
  • We need to focus more on life-after-college preparation for our students.
  • We need to continue to be more intentional about educating the campus community on who our students are and the services we provide.
  • As changes in remediation are implemented throughout the CSU system, we will need to anticipate how this will impact Summer Bridge and our first-time freshmen.
  • The Summer Bridge format needs to be evaluated now that we have implemented EO 1110 and there is no more assessments (ELM) to be given.
  • With the continued increase in first-generation college students and our program at capacity, we need to work with campus partners to find ways to serve more students overall.
  • EOP implemented various assessments of the first-year students to get a better understanding of how they feel about being a college student, support they have received and thoughts of their future. We collect data from four electronic surveys: Summer Bridge Assessment, Early-First-Semester Survey, End-of-First-Semester Survey, and End-of-First-Year Survey. Data from all surveys indicate a majority of students are feeling confident, positive, and supported through EOP’s efforts. Peer mentors (Summer Bridge Resident Advisors and Paraprofessionals) receive the highest praise, while the fall and spring course links, EOP staff and Summer Bridge Mentors are also held in high regard.

VII. Program Objectives For 2019-2020

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.
  2. Enhance contact and support of continuing students who are in good academic standing.
  3. Increase support for our first-year and second-year students through communication via electronic technology.
  4. Implement professional development and career readiness for our continuing EOP students.
  5. As a result of current staffing re-assignments, assess workloads and productivity and reorganize accordingly.
Educational Opportunity ProgramI. Mission Statement

The mission of the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) is to provide access and support services to first-generation college students who have experienced economic, educational, and/or environmental barriers, but display the potential to succeed in post-secondary education and to assist the university in the matriculation, retention, and graduation of EOP students.

Department Goals (Last reviewed July 2019):

  1. EOP will provide a comprehensive program of support services that will enhance the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary for the academic success and the social and emotional personal development of EOP students. (Division goals 1, 2, 3; University strategic priorities 1, 3)
  2. EOP will promote social, cultural, and ethnic diversity in the CSU, Chico campus population. (Division goal 2; University strategic priorities 4, 7, 8)
  3. EOP will educate and inform students, faculty, and staff about program services and accomplishments. (Division goal 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 2, 4, 5, 8)
  4. EOP professional staff will maintain currency in the fields of college student retention, academic advising and obstacles encountered by first-generation and other historically marginalized college students through memberships in professional organizations, reading appropriate research journals, and professional development opportunities. (Division goals 1, 2; 3; University strategic priorities 2, 4, 5, 8)
  5. EOP will encourage student participation and involvement in the CSU, Chico campus community and the community of Chico as a whole. (Division goals 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 4, 6, 7, 8)

II. Department Accomplishments

  • EOP 50th anniversary events--Kick-off event focused on current students.
  • Summer Bridge English Component created EOP 50th webpage.
  • Highest number of participation for the annual Graduate Diversity Forum.
  • Successful campus collaboration for the first campus wide Tipping Point Summit.
  • Diversity Art Exhibit raised funding for donations to CAMP fire survivors.

Highlights:

  • EOP 50th anniversary events—kick-off event focused on current students.
    EOP commenced the celebrations of our 50th anniversary. In the spring 2019, we hosted our current students and campus alumni to enjoy a short program, cake and promotional stickers to mark this kick-off event. A more formal affair with take place this upcoming fall.
  • Highest number of participation for the annual Graduate Diversity Forum
    EOP coordinates the North State California Forum for Diversity in Graduate Education. In 2017, 41 students signed up and only 30 attended the event at UC Merced.  In 2018, 46 students signed up and 36 students attended. In 2019, 46 signed up to participate. 39 students attended the event and an additional 18 students drove themselves to UC Davis for a grand total of 57 participants.
  • Successful campus collaboration for the first campus wide Tipping Point Summit
    On January 17, 2019 the divisions of Student Affairs and Academic Affairs hosted a campus wide    Student Success Summit. Two EOSP employees were part of the planning committee. One of them co-presented.

Diversity Efforts:

  • Participated and presented in the Inaugural “Women Like You” Symposium.
  • Collaborated, planned, facilitated and participated in the campus-wide Tipping Point- Student Success Summit.
  • Presented a workshop to the Inclusive Teaching Academy for faculty development on inclusive learning and teaching.
  • Participated in the Asian Pacific Islander Diversity Summit.
  • EOP Interns programmed a fall cultural event for CSUC students to participate in the annual Dia de los Muertos Altar.
  • Presented and participated in PAUSE 2019—workshop presentation on API data.
  • Women of Excellence (WOE) initiated focus groups to establish a female counterpart to Men of Chico.
  • Presented to Men of Chico on diversity, equity, stereotypes, threats and biases.

III. Changes in policies and procedures

Summer Bridge – Summer Bridge 2019 successfully implemented for a second year the use of technology to help meet students’ academic needs. Initiated the use of both Remind and GroupMe apps to communicate with students during Summer Bridge and continue their use during the academic year.

IV. Resources summary

Resource Allocation

Budget allocation for 2018-2019 (no rollover from 2017-2018) 

$1,106,043
Other one-time dollars/reimbursements$51,970
Work Study allocation for 2018-2019 (EOP only)  $47,600
Total allocation$1,205,613
Funds transferred to FYP($3,445)
Projected Annual Expense($941,643)
Unused Work Study ($10)
Annual Expense – Summer Bridge (2018) ($135,850)
Projected Balance$124,668
Encumbered funds for 2019-202091,448
Actual remaining funds33,220

Note: EOP received base funding dollars for an SSP II position in 2018-2019. EOP is in the process of hiring this position during the summer. The remaining encumbered funds are for one-time projects that did not get spent in the 2018-2019 fiscal year.

Human Resources

  • Cecilia Santillan-Robles applied for and was hired as the Early Outreach and Support Programs (EOSP) Director in March 2019, therefore leaving her EOP Associate Director position vacant. Vikki Bass applied for and was hired as the new EOP Associate Director in June 2019.
  • Currently in the hiring process for an Admissions Specialist (SSPII).
  • Due to continued increase in the number of completed applications and in order to meet the Admissions and Financial Aid timelines, EOP hired a special consultant in the spring to assist in reviewing admission files.

Facilities/Equipment

  • Reserving rooms (especially large capacity rooms) and computer labs for Summer Bridge continues to be a challenge.
  • The procedure of unlocking reserved rooms consistently and in a timely fashion continues to be a challenge.

V. Program Assessment of Past Year

Program Objectives for 2018-2019

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.
    Ongoing – EOP Advisors and Interns focused on reaching out to EOP students on AP to meet with them on a regular basis to develop a plan of action for getting off of AP.
  1. Increase contact and support of continuing students who are in good academic standing.
    Ongoing – EOP will increase intentional contact to all good academic standing students and offer programming to support their success. 
  1. Enhance support for our first year students through communication via electronic technology.
    Met/Ongoing – EOP established use of two apps – REMIND and GroupMe to offer a mechanism to share information and send out reminders. These methods have proven to be effective in delivering our messaging to our students.
  1. Focus on professional development and career readiness for our continuing EOP students.
    Ongoing – EOP has initiated more intentional collaboration with the Career Center. We will include language in our second year success contract to ensure students will meet with the Career Center and develop workshops focused on our students.
  1. As a result of current staffing re-assignments, assess workloads and productivity and reorganize accordingly.
    Ongoing– EOP continues to adjust to the transitions that have occurred with the unit’s promotions and new members. Ongoing meetings to communicate transitions and expectations will help foster a smoother transition.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts:

Breakdown by Admissions Category: EOP Bona Fide Enrolled (Primary Goals 1 and 2)

Admissions Category

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

Freshmen Exception

32

44

65

37

23

Freshmen Regular

179

171

126

156

171

Transfer Exception

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular

55

49

63

54

0

Transfer Regular “S”

0

0

0

0

0

Total

266

264

254

247

194

Breakdown by Admissions Category: Non-Bona Fide EOP Enrolled (Primary Goal 1 and 2)

Admissions Category

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

Freshmen Exception

0

0

2

1

0

Freshmen Regular

2

0

4

1

71

Transfer Exception

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular “S”

0

0

0

0

0

Total

2

0

6

2

71

EOP Ethnicity Of Enrolled Admits – Fall Semesters (Primary Goal 2)

 

Fall 2014

 

Fall 2015

 

Fall 2016

 

Fall 2017

Fall 2018   

Ethnicity

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

African American

10

21

7

19

11

16

7

27

10

22

American Indian

0

1

0

3

0

2

0

2

0

4

Asian American

4

39

6

38

3

31

2

42

0

28

Filipino

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Mexican American

16

137

29

138

48

109

27

100

9

98

Other Latino

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Pacific Islander

0

1

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

1

Unknown

0

3

1

0

0

4

0

5

2

60

White/Non-Latino

0

29

1

17

1

21

2

25

1

19

2 or More Ethnicities

2

14

0

5

2

9

0

10

1

10

Total

32

245

44

220

67

193

38

211

23

242

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)


Cohort: Fall 2013

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2013

211

Spring 2014

208

97%

Fall 2014

195

92%

Spring 2015

191

91%

Fall 2015

176

83%

Spring 2016

174

82%

Fall 2016

162

77%

Spring 2017

159

75%

Fall 2017

139

66%

Spring 2018

114

54%

Fall 2018

60

28%

Spring 2019

36

17%

Cohort: Fall 2014

Cohort: Fall 2014

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2014

214

Spring 2015

210

98%

Fall 2015

195

91%

Spring 2016

190

89%

Fall 2016

175

82%

Spring 2017

173

81%

Fall 2017

160

75%

Spring 2018

160

75%

Fall 2018

118

55%

Spring 2019

85

40%

Cohort: Fall 2015

Cohort: Fall 2015

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2015

216

Spring 2016

214

99%

Fall 2016

191

88%

Spring 2017

186

86%

Fall 2017

173

80%

Spring 2018

161

75%

Fall 2018

155

72%

Spring 2019

155

72%

Cohort: Fall 2016

Cohort: Fall 2016

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2016

195

Spring 2017

189

97%

Fall 2017

174

89%

Spring 2018

165

85%

Fall 2018

146

75%

Spring 2019

146

75%

Cohort: Fall 2017

Cohort: Fall 2017

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2017

195

Spring 2018

190

97%

Fall 2018

176

90%

Spring 2019

168

86%

Cohort: Fall 2018

Cohort: Fall 2018

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2018

195

Spring 2019

186

95%

4- and 6-year Graduation Rates (Primary Goal 1)

Fall Semester

Cohort

Percent of Cohort Graduating

Count

4 Year Grad Total

4 Year Grad %

6 Year Grad Total

6 Year Grad %

1995

175

9

5%

39

22%

1996

188

2

1%

45

24%

1997

180

11

6%

58

32%

1998

203

10

5%

61

30%

1999

220

18

8%

77

35%

2000

170

3

2%

56

33%

2001

200

10

5%

68

34%

2002

211

11

5%

63

30%

2003

197

12

6%

87

44%

2004

160

13

8%

74

46%

2005

211

15

7%

99

47%

2006

214

17

8%

103

48%

2007

173

7

4%

62

36%

2008

200

6

3%

94

47%

2009

228

25

11%

123

54%

2010

215

15

7%

144

67%

2011

237

14

6%

138 

58% 

2012

219

33

15%

119 

54% 

2013

211

22

10%

127

60%

2014

213

36

17%

2015

215

32

15%

Note: This is a new table for Graduation Initiative purposes.

EOP Total Student Enrollment Ethnicity (Primary Goal 2)

Ethnicity

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

    Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

African American

93

97

100

116

127

American Indian

13

14

9

12

11

Asian American

263

235

204

193

172

Filipino

0

0

0

0

0

Mexican American

691

703

686

666

591

Other Latino

7

2

0

0

0

Pacific Islander

4

2

5

5

3

Unknown

18

16

1

1

76

White\Non-Latino

123

107

98

101

96

2 or More Ethnicities*

47

44

38

32

39

Total

1259

1220

1141

1126

1115

Total EOP Students by GPA (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%
         #            %

3.5 +

152

13

105

9

124

14

124

14

       121          14

3.0 to 3.49

290

25

289

24

224

25

224

25

204          24

2.5 to 2.99

352

30

380

32

283

31

283

31

282          33

2.0 to 2.49

270

23

327

27

235

26

235

26

289          22

1.99 & below

95

8

93

8

51

6

51

6

56            7

Total

1159

100

1192

100

917

100

917

100

852        100

2.0 or better

 

92

 

92

 

94

 

94

              93

EOP FTF Students by GPA* (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%
#             %
#             %

3.5 +

26

12

42

20

23

12

33           17

45           24

3.0 to 3.49

43

20

56

27

34

18

44           23

59           32

2.5 to 2.99

73

35

45

21

65

35

48           25

39           21

2.0 to 2.49

33

16

38

18

36

19

33           17

28           15

1.99 & below

35

17

30

14

28

15

31           16

15           8

Total

210

100

211

100

186

100

    189         100

    186         100

2.0 or better

 

83

 

86

 

85

              84

              92

Total EOP Students by Class Level (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%
#             %
#             %

Freshmen

231

12

227

20

214

19

204           19

195           19

Sophomore

221

20

224

19

211

19

200           19

196           19

Junior

275

35

274

24

282

26

272           25

267           26

Senior

464

16

434

37

396

36

401           37

381           37

Total

1191

1159

1103

   1077      

   1039      

Computer Lab Usage (Primary Goal 1)

Total Students that used Computer Lab at Least Once

Total EOP Students

Total Percentage

Fall 2012

749

1207

62.05

Spring 2013

668

1175

56.85

Fall 2013

769

1254

61.32

Spring 2014

740

1204

61.46

Fall 2014

859

1273

67.48

Spring 2015*

0

0

0.00

Fall 2015

744

1220

60.98

Spring 2016

775

1159

66.87

Fall 2016

736

1151

63.94

Spring 2017

672

1099

61.15

Fall 2017**

0

1150

0.00

Spring 2018

746

1090

68.44

Fall 2018

913

1130

80.80

Spring 2019

968

1049

92.28

*Note: During the Spring 2015 semester, our lab check in system data got corrupted in the Cbord database. We had to replace the check in system and lost all of the data associated with that semester. **During the fall 2017 semester, the lab check in machine broke. The check in system had to be replaced and all of the data associated with the fall semester was lost.

Student Learning Outcomes

SLO #1 – As a result of participating in the English “Stretch Model”, students should be able to successfully pass ENGL 130. - This is the ninth year that ENGL 130 was moved to the spring semester. English faculty collaborated with the campus FYE program to create an English “stretch” model for students enrolled in the EOP Course Link for the fall and spring semesters. This past year, 98% of our first-year students passed ENGL 130 on their first attempt.

SLO #2 – As a result of participating in the “Reality Check 101” series, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first semester - EOP staff are constantly looking for ways to provide earlier intervention for students having academic difficulty. During the fall semester, students receiving two or more negative progress reports (C- or below), or were referred by their paraprofessional, had a negative service indicator (NSI) placed on their accounts. The NSI was not released until they attended a “Reality Check” workshop or made special arrangements. Nineteen students were required to attend the “Reality Check” workshop during the fall 2018 semester. This one-hour workshop, facilitated by EOP Advisors, was held in the fall and designed to strengthen academic performance and avoid academic probation at the end of the semester. Some of the workshop activities included:

  • Helping students reflect on their academic performance
  • Identifying challenges or obstacles, on and off campus, from fall semester
  • Discussing academic probation (Chico or cumulative GPA below 2.0)
  • Discussing reality of disqualification (Chico or cumulative GPA below 1.5 for students with less than 30 units)
  • Goal setting by identifying three things the students will change to enhance their engagement and academic achievement.

Of the 19 students required to attend “Reality Check”, 19 completed the workshop or attended an individual meeting. Ten (52.7%) avoided academic probation; 9 (47.3%) finished the fall 2018 semester on academic probation.

SLO #3 – As a result of participating in “Fresh Start”, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first year. – EOP first-year students with a GPA below a 2.0 after their first semester are required to attend a series of workshops called “Fresh Start” in the spring. (This program was also extended to PATH Scholar first-year participants, however, the results below are only applicable to EOP students). The purpose of “Fresh Start” is to present a structured set of workshops that provide students on academic probation university policy information and an opportunity to explore social and emotional learning (SEL) so they can clear their academic standing with the university as well as increase their understanding of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills and decision making, and how they inform their academics. Ninety-minute workshops were held for five weeks and facilitated by EOP Advisors and Paraprofessional Advisors. Workshop activities included:

Week 1 – Reflection – How did I get here? /AP and DQ information, Social Emotional Learning and Community Cultural Wealth
Week 2 – Personality Assessment, Growth Mindset, Grit, What is success to you?
Week 3 – Challenges and Obstacles, Values, Attributes and Shortcomings – Navigating Campus Resources, Academic/Classroom Strategies
Week 4 – Skills to Enhance Learning
Week 5 – Goal Setting

In spring 2019, 25 first-year students out of 195 were required to attend “Fresh Start”. This was 12.8% of first year students (compared to 23% in spring 2018, 23% in spring 2017, 16% in spring 2016, 12.1% in spring 2015, 15% in spring 2014, 11.4% in spring 2013; and 13% in spring 2012). Nine (42%) ended the semester in good academic standing (Chico GPA above 2.0), 4 (19%) improved yet remain on academic probation, 1 (4.7%) students improved but are in DQ range, while 4 (19%) students’ GPA’s declined and are in DQ range. In addition, 2 (9.5%) students improved their Chico GPA’s and were offered academic contracts through Academic Advising Programs. One was an Institutional Contract and the other a Special Contract.  Overall, 16 (76%) of the students improved their GPA.

*Averages for Fresh Start 2019 are based on 21 total students, as four of the 25 required to attend did not enroll for the spring semester.

SLO #4 – As a result of participating in the Expanded Summer Bridge program, students requiring math remediation will either score high enough on the ELM to move up to the next level of math or satisfy the Early Start remedial math requirement completely. – In Summer 2018, EO665 was replaced with EO1110 which meant we no longer have the ELM or EPT for students to test on. EO 1110 focuses on multiple measures to place students in their respective English and math level. We now focus on students satisfying early start by taking a math and English component during Summer Bridge.

VI. Analysis

  • We need to continue to work with the entire team to help with transitions of new roles. The EOSP Director has been in a new position for only 2 months. The EOP Associate Director has been in her role for only one month. We need to organize to ensure appropriate workload and productivity. We are in the process of hiring an Admissions Specialist to start in the fall.
  • Continue to review program analysis and outcomes to align with GI 2025.
  • Since we are down an EOP Advisor, we are seeking a graduate intern to help with some of the projects and academic advising during drop-in times. This will alleviate some of the workload of the remaining staff.
  • Because of our lower incoming class numbers, EOP had to reduce one section of the Course Link offered to all incoming EOP first-time freshmen. These sections foster a sense of community and belonging and hopefully enhance our persistence rates.
  • EOP will need to readjust the number of seats we ask for in our Course Link sections as more students enter with college level credit coursework completed.
  • EOP has a commitment to the original ideals of the program. We will need to continue to maximize efforts to prioritize our exceptional admit pool.
  • Our EOP admissions process needs to keep pace with Admissions and Financial Aid timelines. Hiring supplemental assistance this past cycle was instrumental in meeting these deadlines. We will continue to look for ways to shorten the amount of time it takes to review files.
  • We need to continue to provide more resources for our second-year students. They will continue to work closely with our student intern staff, and utilize some of the components from our EOP/FYE model. Our Second Year Success Program will continue to need additional resources to focus on social activities and programming.
  • We need to focus more on life-after-college preparation for our students.
  • We need to continue to be more intentional about educating the campus community on who our students are and the services we provide.
  • As changes in remediation are implemented throughout the CSU system, we will need to anticipate how this will impact Summer Bridge and our first-time freshmen.
  • The Summer Bridge format needs to be evaluated now that we have implemented EO 1110 and there is no more assessments (ELM) to be given.
  • With the continued increase in first-generation college students and our program at capacity, we need to work with campus partners to find ways to serve more students overall.
  • EOP implemented various assessments of the first-year students to get a better understanding of how they feel about being a college student, support they have received and thoughts of their future. We collect data from four electronic surveys: Summer Bridge Assessment, Early-First-Semester Survey, End-of-First-Semester Survey, and End-of-First-Year Survey. Data from all surveys indicate a majority of students are feeling confident, positive, and supported through EOP’s efforts. Peer mentors (Summer Bridge Resident Advisors and Paraprofessionals) receive the highest praise, while the fall and spring course links, EOP staff and Summer Bridge Mentors are also held in high regard.

VII. Program Objectives For 2019-2020

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.
  2. Enhance contact and support of continuing students who are in good academic standing.
  3. Increase support for our first-year and second-year students through communication via electronic technology.
  4. Implement professional development and career readiness for our continuing EOP students.
  5. As a result of current staffing re-assignments, assess workloads and productivity and reorganize accordingly.
Educational Opportunity ProgramI. Mission Statement

The mission of the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) is to provide access and support services to first-generation college students who have experienced economic, educational, and/or environmental barriers, but display the potential to succeed in post-secondary education and to assist the university in the matriculation, retention, and graduation of EOP students.

Department Goals (Last reviewed July 2019):

  1. EOP will provide a comprehensive program of support services that will enhance the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary for the academic success and the social and emotional personal development of EOP students. (Division goals 1, 2, 3; University strategic priorities 1, 3)
  2. EOP will promote social, cultural, and ethnic diversity in the CSU, Chico campus population. (Division goal 2; University strategic priorities 4, 7, 8)
  3. EOP will educate and inform students, faculty, and staff about program services and accomplishments. (Division goal 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 2, 4, 5, 8)
  4. EOP professional staff will maintain currency in the fields of college student retention, academic advising and obstacles encountered by first-generation and other historically marginalized college students through memberships in professional organizations, reading appropriate research journals, and professional development opportunities. (Division goals 1, 2; 3; University strategic priorities 2, 4, 5, 8)
  5. EOP will encourage student participation and involvement in the CSU, Chico campus community and the community of Chico as a whole. (Division goals 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 4, 6, 7, 8)

II. Department Accomplishments

  • EOP 50th anniversary events--Kick-off event focused on current students.
  • Summer Bridge English Component created EOP 50th webpage.
  • Highest number of participation for the annual Graduate Diversity Forum.
  • Successful campus collaboration for the first campus wide Tipping Point Summit.
  • Diversity Art Exhibit raised funding for donations to CAMP fire survivors.

Highlights:

  • EOP 50th anniversary events—kick-off event focused on current students.
    EOP commenced the celebrations of our 50th anniversary. In the spring 2019, we hosted our current students and campus alumni to enjoy a short program, cake and promotional stickers to mark this kick-off event. A more formal affair with take place this upcoming fall.
  • Highest number of participation for the annual Graduate Diversity Forum
    EOP coordinates the North State California Forum for Diversity in Graduate Education. In 2017, 41 students signed up and only 30 attended the event at UC Merced.  In 2018, 46 students signed up and 36 students attended. In 2019, 46 signed up to participate. 39 students attended the event and an additional 18 students drove themselves to UC Davis for a grand total of 57 participants.
  • Successful campus collaboration for the first campus wide Tipping Point Summit
    On January 17, 2019 the divisions of Student Affairs and Academic Affairs hosted a campus wide    Student Success Summit. Two EOSP employees were part of the planning committee. One of them co-presented.

Diversity Efforts:

  • Participated and presented in the Inaugural “Women Like You” Symposium.
  • Collaborated, planned, facilitated and participated in the campus-wide Tipping Point- Student Success Summit.
  • Presented a workshop to the Inclusive Teaching Academy for faculty development on inclusive learning and teaching.
  • Participated in the Asian Pacific Islander Diversity Summit.
  • EOP Interns programmed a fall cultural event for CSUC students to participate in the annual Dia de los Muertos Altar.
  • Presented and participated in PAUSE 2019—workshop presentation on API data.
  • Women of Excellence (WOE) initiated focus groups to establish a female counterpart to Men of Chico.
  • Presented to Men of Chico on diversity, equity, stereotypes, threats and biases.

III. Changes in policies and procedures

Summer Bridge – Summer Bridge 2019 successfully implemented for a second year the use of technology to help meet students’ academic needs. Initiated the use of both Remind and GroupMe apps to communicate with students during Summer Bridge and continue their use during the academic year.

IV. Resources summary

Resource Allocation

Budget allocation for 2018-2019 (no rollover from 2017-2018) 

$1,106,043
Other one-time dollars/reimbursements$51,970
Work Study allocation for 2018-2019 (EOP only)  $47,600
Total allocation$1,205,613
Funds transferred to FYP($3,445)
Projected Annual Expense($941,643)
Unused Work Study ($10)
Annual Expense – Summer Bridge (2018) ($135,850)
Projected Balance$124,668
Encumbered funds for 2019-202091,448
Actual remaining funds33,220

Note: EOP received base funding dollars for an SSP II position in 2018-2019. EOP is in the process of hiring this position during the summer. The remaining encumbered funds are for one-time projects that did not get spent in the 2018-2019 fiscal year.

Human Resources

  • Cecilia Santillan-Robles applied for and was hired as the Early Outreach and Support Programs (EOSP) Director in March 2019, therefore leaving her EOP Associate Director position vacant. Vikki Bass applied for and was hired as the new EOP Associate Director in June 2019.
  • Currently in the hiring process for an Admissions Specialist (SSPII).
  • Due to continued increase in the number of completed applications and in order to meet the Admissions and Financial Aid timelines, EOP hired a special consultant in the spring to assist in reviewing admission files.

Facilities/Equipment

  • Reserving rooms (especially large capacity rooms) and computer labs for Summer Bridge continues to be a challenge.
  • The procedure of unlocking reserved rooms consistently and in a timely fashion continues to be a challenge.

V. Program Assessment of Past Year

Program Objectives for 2018-2019

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.
    Ongoing – EOP Advisors and Interns focused on reaching out to EOP students on AP to meet with them on a regular basis to develop a plan of action for getting off of AP.
  1. Increase contact and support of continuing students who are in good academic standing.
    Ongoing – EOP will increase intentional contact to all good academic standing students and offer programming to support their success. 
  1. Enhance support for our first year students through communication via electronic technology.
    Met/Ongoing – EOP established use of two apps – REMIND and GroupMe to offer a mechanism to share information and send out reminders. These methods have proven to be effective in delivering our messaging to our students.
  1. Focus on professional development and career readiness for our continuing EOP students.
    Ongoing – EOP has initiated more intentional collaboration with the Career Center. We will include language in our second year success contract to ensure students will meet with the Career Center and develop workshops focused on our students.
  1. As a result of current staffing re-assignments, assess workloads and productivity and reorganize accordingly.
    Ongoing– EOP continues to adjust to the transitions that have occurred with the unit’s promotions and new members. Ongoing meetings to communicate transitions and expectations will help foster a smoother transition.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts:

Breakdown by Admissions Category: EOP Bona Fide Enrolled (Primary Goals 1 and 2)

Admissions Category

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

Freshmen Exception

32

44

65

37

23

Freshmen Regular

179

171

126

156

171

Transfer Exception

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular

55

49

63

54

0

Transfer Regular “S”

0

0

0

0

0

Total

266

264

254

247

194

Breakdown by Admissions Category: Non-Bona Fide EOP Enrolled (Primary Goal 1 and 2)

Admissions Category

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

Freshmen Exception

0

0

2

1

0

Freshmen Regular

2

0

4

1

71

Transfer Exception

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular

0

0

0

0

0

Transfer Regular “S”

0

0

0

0

0

Total

2

0

6

2

71

EOP Ethnicity Of Enrolled Admits – Fall Semesters (Primary Goal 2)

 

Fall 2014

 

Fall 2015

 

Fall 2016

 

Fall 2017

Fall 2018   

Ethnicity

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

EXC

REG

African American

10

21

7

19

11

16

7

27

10

22

American Indian

0

1

0

3

0

2

0

2

0

4

Asian American

4

39

6

38

3

31

2

42

0

28

Filipino

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Mexican American

16

137

29

138

48

109

27

100

9

98

Other Latino

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Pacific Islander

0

1

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

1

Unknown

0

3

1

0

0

4

0

5

2

60

White/Non-Latino

0

29

1

17

1

21

2

25

1

19

2 or More Ethnicities

2

14

0

5

2

9

0

10

1

10

Total

32

245

44

220

67

193

38

211

23

242

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)


Cohort: Fall 2013

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2013

211

Spring 2014

208

97%

Fall 2014

195

92%

Spring 2015

191

91%

Fall 2015

176

83%

Spring 2016

174

82%

Fall 2016

162

77%

Spring 2017

159

75%

Fall 2017

139

66%

Spring 2018

114

54%

Fall 2018

60

28%

Spring 2019

36

17%

Cohort: Fall 2014

Cohort: Fall 2014

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2014

214

Spring 2015

210

98%

Fall 2015

195

91%

Spring 2016

190

89%

Fall 2016

175

82%

Spring 2017

173

81%

Fall 2017

160

75%

Spring 2018

160

75%

Fall 2018

118

55%

Spring 2019

85

40%

Cohort: Fall 2015

Cohort: Fall 2015

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2015

216

Spring 2016

214

99%

Fall 2016

191

88%

Spring 2017

186

86%

Fall 2017

173

80%

Spring 2018

161

75%

Fall 2018

155

72%

Spring 2019

155

72%

Cohort: Fall 2016

Cohort: Fall 2016

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2016

195

Spring 2017

189

97%

Fall 2017

174

89%

Spring 2018

165

85%

Fall 2018

146

75%

Spring 2019

146

75%

Cohort: Fall 2017

Cohort: Fall 2017

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2017

195

Spring 2018

190

97%

Fall 2018

176

90%

Spring 2019

168

86%

Cohort: Fall 2018

Cohort: Fall 2018

All EOP Freshmen

Total enrolled

% persistence

Fall 2018

195

Spring 2019

186

95%

4- and 6-year Graduation Rates (Primary Goal 1)

Fall Semester

Cohort

Percent of Cohort Graduating

Count

4 Year Grad Total

4 Year Grad %

6 Year Grad Total

6 Year Grad %

1995

175

9

5%

39

22%

1996

188

2

1%

45

24%

1997

180

11

6%

58

32%

1998

203

10

5%

61

30%

1999

220

18

8%

77

35%

2000

170

3

2%

56

33%

2001

200

10

5%

68

34%

2002

211

11

5%

63

30%

2003

197

12

6%

87

44%

2004

160

13

8%

74

46%

2005

211

15

7%

99

47%

2006

214

17

8%

103

48%

2007

173

7

4%

62

36%

2008

200

6

3%

94

47%

2009

228

25

11%

123

54%

2010

215

15

7%

144

67%

2011

237

14

6%

138 

58% 

2012

219

33

15%

119 

54% 

2013

211

22

10%

127

60%

2014

213

36

17%

2015

215

32

15%

Note: This is a new table for Graduation Initiative purposes.

EOP Total Student Enrollment Ethnicity (Primary Goal 2)

Ethnicity

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

    Fall 2016

Fall 2017

Fall 2018

African American

93

97

100

116

127

American Indian

13

14

9

12

11

Asian American

263

235

204

193

172

Filipino

0

0

0

0

0

Mexican American

691

703

686

666

591

Other Latino

7

2

0

0

0

Pacific Islander

4

2

5

5

3

Unknown

18

16

1

1

76

White\Non-Latino

123

107

98

101

96

2 or More Ethnicities*

47

44

38

32

39

Total

1259

1220

1141

1126

1115

Total EOP Students by GPA (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%
         #            %

3.5 +

152

13

105

9

124

14

124

14

       121          14

3.0 to 3.49

290

25

289

24

224

25

224

25

204          24

2.5 to 2.99

352

30

380

32

283

31

283

31

282          33

2.0 to 2.49

270

23

327

27

235

26

235

26

289          22

1.99 & below

95

8

93

8

51

6

51

6

56            7

Total

1159

100

1192

100

917

100

917

100

852        100

2.0 or better

 

92

 

92

 

94

 

94

              93

EOP FTF Students by GPA* (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%
#             %
#             %

3.5 +

26

12

42

20

23

12

33           17

45           24

3.0 to 3.49

43

20

56

27

34

18

44           23

59           32

2.5 to 2.99

73

35

45

21

65

35

48           25

39           21

2.0 to 2.49

33

16

38

18

36

19

33           17

28           15

1.99 & below

35

17

30

14

28

15

31           16

15           8

Total

210

100

211

100

186

100

    189         100

    186         100

2.0 or better

 

83

 

86

 

85

              84

              92

Total EOP Students by Class Level (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%
#             %
#             %

Freshmen

231

12

227

20

214

19

204           19

195           19

Sophomore

221

20

224

19

211

19

200           19

196           19

Junior

275

35

274

24

282

26

272           25

267           26

Senior

464

16

434

37

396

36

401           37

381           37

Total

1191

1159

1103

   1077      

   1039      

Computer Lab Usage (Primary Goal 1)

Total Students that used Computer Lab at Least Once

Total EOP Students

Total Percentage

Fall 2012

749

1207

62.05

Spring 2013

668

1175

56.85

Fall 2013

769

1254

61.32

Spring 2014

740

1204

61.46

Fall 2014

859

1273

67.48

Spring 2015*

0

0

0.00

Fall 2015

744

1220

60.98

Spring 2016

775

1159

66.87

Fall 2016

736

1151

63.94

Spring 2017

672

1099

61.15

Fall 2017**

0

1150

0.00

Spring 2018

746

1090

68.44

Fall 2018

913

1130

80.80

Spring 2019

968

1049

92.28

*Note: During the Spring 2015 semester, our lab check in system data got corrupted in the Cbord database. We had to replace the check in system and lost all of the data associated with that semester. **During the fall 2017 semester, the lab check in machine broke. The check in system had to be replaced and all of the data associated with the fall semester was lost.

Student Learning Outcomes

SLO #1 – As a result of participating in the English “Stretch Model”, students should be able to successfully pass ENGL 130. - This is the ninth year that ENGL 130 was moved to the spring semester. English faculty collaborated with the campus FYE program to create an English “stretch” model for students enrolled in the EOP Course Link for the fall and spring semesters. This past year, 98% of our first-year students passed ENGL 130 on their first attempt.

SLO #2 – As a result of participating in the “Reality Check 101” series, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first semester - EOP staff are constantly looking for ways to provide earlier intervention for students having academic difficulty. During the fall semester, students receiving two or more negative progress reports (C- or below), or were referred by their paraprofessional, had a negative service indicator (NSI) placed on their accounts. The NSI was not released until they attended a “Reality Check” workshop or made special arrangements. Nineteen students were required to attend the “Reality Check” workshop during the fall 2018 semester. This one-hour workshop, facilitated by EOP Advisors, was held in the fall and designed to strengthen academic performance and avoid academic probation at the end of the semester. Some of the workshop activities included:

  • Helping students reflect on their academic performance
  • Identifying challenges or obstacles, on and off campus, from fall semester
  • Discussing academic probation (Chico or cumulative GPA below 2.0)
  • Discussing reality of disqualification (Chico or cumulative GPA below 1.5 for students with less than 30 units)
  • Goal setting by identifying three things the students will change to enhance their engagement and academic achievement.

Of the 19 students required to attend “Reality Check”, 19 completed the workshop or attended an individual meeting. Ten (52.7%) avoided academic probation; 9 (47.3%) finished the fall 2018 semester on academic probation.

SLO #3 – As a result of participating in “Fresh Start”, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first year. – EOP first-year students with a GPA below a 2.0 after their first semester are required to attend a series of workshops called “Fresh Start” in the spring. (This program was also extended to PATH Scholar first-year participants, however, the results below are only applicable to EOP students). The purpose of “Fresh Start” is to present a structured set of workshops that provide students on academic probation university policy information and an opportunity to explore social and emotional learning (SEL) so they can clear their academic standing with the university as well as increase their understanding of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills and decision making, and how they inform their academics. Ninety-minute workshops were held for five weeks and facilitated by EOP Advisors and Paraprofessional Advisors. Workshop activities included:

Week 1 – Reflection – How did I get here? /AP and DQ information, Social Emotional Learning and Community Cultural Wealth
Week 2 – Personality Assessment, Growth Mindset, Grit, What is success to you?
Week 3 – Challenges and Obstacles, Values, Attributes and Shortcomings – Navigating Campus Resources, Academic/Classroom Strategies
Week 4 – Skills to Enhance Learning
Week 5 – Goal Setting

In spring 2019, 25 first-year students out of 195 were required to attend “Fresh Start”. This was 12.8% of first year students (compared to 23% in spring 2018, 23% in spring 2017, 16% in spring 2016, 12.1% in spring 2015, 15% in spring 2014, 11.4% in spring 2013; and 13% in spring 2012). Nine (42%) ended the semester in good academic standing (Chico GPA above 2.0), 4 (19%) improved yet remain on academic probation, 1 (4.7%) students improved but are in DQ range, while 4 (19%) students’ GPA’s declined and are in DQ range. In addition, 2 (9.5%) students improved their Chico GPA’s and were offered academic contracts through Academic Advising Programs. One was an Institutional Contract and the other a Special Contract.  Overall, 16 (76%) of the students improved their GPA.

*Averages for Fresh Start 2019 are based on 21 total students, as four of the 25 required to attend did not enroll for the spring semester.

SLO #4 – As a result of participating in the Expanded Summer Bridge program, students requiring math remediation will either score high enough on the ELM to move up to the next level of math or satisfy the Early Start remedial math requirement completely. – In Summer 2018, EO665 was replaced with EO1110 which meant we no longer have the ELM or EPT for students to test on. EO 1110 focuses on multiple measures to place students in their respective English and math level. We now focus on students satisfying early start by taking a math and English component during Summer Bridge.

VI. Analysis

  • We need to continue to work with the entire team to help with transitions of new roles. The EOSP Director has been in a new position for only 2 months. The EOP Associate Director has been in her role for only one month. We need to organize to ensure appropriate workload and productivity. We are in the process of hiring an Admissions Specialist to start in the fall.
  • Continue to review program analysis and outcomes to align with GI 2025.
  • Since we are down an EOP Advisor, we are seeking a graduate intern to help with some of the projects and academic advising during drop-in times. This will alleviate some of the workload of the remaining staff.
  • Because of our lower incoming class numbers, EOP had to reduce one section of the Course Link offered to all incoming EOP first-time freshmen. These sections foster a sense of community and belonging and hopefully enhance our persistence rates.
  • EOP will need to readjust the number of seats we ask for in our Course Link sections as more students enter with college level credit coursework completed.
  • EOP has a commitment to the original ideals of the program. We will need to continue to maximize efforts to prioritize our exceptional admit pool.
  • Our EOP admissions process needs to keep pace with Admissions and Financial Aid timelines. Hiring supplemental assistance this past cycle was instrumental in meeting these deadlines. We will continue to look for ways to shorten the amount of time it takes to review files.
  • We need to continue to provide more resources for our second-year students. They will continue to work closely with our student intern staff, and utilize some of the components from our EOP/FYE model. Our Second Year Success Program will continue to need additional resources to focus on social activities and programming.
  • We need to focus more on life-after-college preparation for our students.
  • We need to continue to be more intentional about educating the campus community on who our students are and the services we provide.
  • As changes in remediation are implemented throughout the CSU system, we will need to anticipate how this will impact Summer Bridge and our first-time freshmen.
  • The Summer Bridge format needs to be evaluated now that we have implemented EO 1110 and there is no more assessments (ELM) to be given.
  • With the continued increase in first-generation college students and our program at capacity, we need to work with campus partners to find ways to serve more students overall.
  • EOP implemented various assessments of the first-year students to get a better understanding of how they feel about being a college student, support they have received and thoughts of their future. We collect data from four electronic surveys: Summer Bridge Assessment, Early-First-Semester Survey, End-of-First-Semester Survey, and End-of-First-Year Survey. Data from all surveys indicate a majority of students are feeling confident, positive, and supported through EOP’s efforts. Peer mentors (Summer Bridge Resident Advisors and Paraprofessionals) receive the highest praise, while the fall and spring course links, EOP staff and Summer Bridge Mentors are also held in high regard.

VII. Program Objectives For 2019-2020

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.
  2. Enhance contact and support of continuing students who are in good academic standing.
  3. Increase support for our first-year and second-year students through communication via electronic technology.
  4. Implement professional development and career readiness for our continuing EOP students.
  5. As a result of current staffing re-assignments, assess workloads and productivity and reorganize accordingly.

Total EOP Students by Class Level (Primary Goal 1)

 

Spring 2015
Spring 2016
Spring 2017
Spring 2018
Spring 2019

GPA

#

%

#

%

#

%
#             %
#             %

Freshmen

231

12

227

20

214

19

204           19

195           19

Sophomore

221

20

224

19

211

19

200           19

196           19

Junior

275

35

274

24

282

26

272           25

267           26

Senior

464

16

434

37

396

36

401           37

381           37

Total

1191

1159

1103

   1077      

   1039      

Computer Lab Usage (Primary Goal 1)

Total Students that used Computer Lab at Least Once

Total EOP Students

Total Percentage

Fall 2012

749

1207

62.05

Spring 2013

668

1175

56.85

Fall 2013

769

1254

61.32

Spring 2014

740

1204

61.46

Fall 2014

859

1273

67.48

Spring 2015*

0

0

0.00

Fall 2015

744

1220

60.98

Spring 2016

775

1159

66.87

Fall 2016

736

1151

63.94

Spring 2017

672

1099

61.15

Fall 2017**

0

1150

0.00

Spring 2018

746

1090

68.44

Fall 2018

913

1130

80.80

Spring 2019

968

1049

92.28

*Note: During the Spring 2015 semester, our lab check in system data got corrupted in the Cbord database. We had to replace the check in system and lost all of the data associated with that semester. **During the fall 2017 semester, the lab check in machine broke. The check in system had to be replaced and all of the data associated with the fall semester was lost.

Student Learning Outcomes

SLO #1 – As a result of participating in the English “Stretch Model”, students should be able to successfully pass ENGL 130. - This is the ninth year that ENGL 130 was moved to the spring semester. English faculty collaborated with the campus FYE program to create an English “stretch” model for students enrolled in the EOP Course Link for the fall and spring semesters. This past year, 98% of our first-year students passed ENGL 130 on their first attempt.

SLO #2 – As a result of participating in the “Reality Check 101” series, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first semester - EOP staff are constantly looking for ways to provide earlier intervention for students having academic difficulty. During the fall semester, students receiving two or more negative progress reports (C- or below), or were referred by their paraprofessional, had a negative service indicator (NSI) placed on their accounts. The NSI was not released until they attended a “Reality Check” workshop or made special arrangements. Nineteen students were required to attend the “Reality Check” workshop during the fall 2018 semester. This one-hour workshop, facilitated by EOP Advisors, was held in the fall and designed to strengthen academic performance and avoid academic probation at the end of the semester. Some of the workshop activities included:

  • Helping students reflect on their academic performance
  • Identifying challenges or obstacles, on and off campus, from fall semester
  • Discussing academic probation (Chico or cumulative GPA below 2.0)
  • Discussing reality of disqualification (Chico or cumulative GPA below 1.5 for students with less than 30 units)
  • Goal setting by identifying three things the students will change to enhance their engagement and academic achievement.

Of the 19 students required to attend “Reality Check”, 19 completed the workshop or attended an individual meeting. Ten (52.7%) avoided academic probation; 9 (47.3%) finished the fall 2018 semester on academic probation.

SLO #3 – As a result of participating in “Fresh Start”, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first year. – EOP first-year students with a GPA below a 2.0 after their first semester are required to attend a series of workshops called “Fresh Start” in the spring. (This program was also extended to PATH Scholar first-year participants, however, the results below are only applicable to EOP students). The purpose of “Fresh Start” is to present a structured set of workshops that provide students on academic probation university policy information and an opportunity to explore social and emotional learning (SEL) so they can clear their academic standing with the university as well as increase their understanding of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills and decision making, and how they inform their academics. Ninety-minute workshops were held for five weeks and facilitated by EOP Advisors and Paraprofessional Advisors. Workshop activities included:

Week 1 – Reflection – How did I get here? /AP and DQ information, Social Emotional Learning and Community Cultural Wealth
Week 2 – Personality Assessment, Growth Mindset, Grit, What is success to you?
Week 3 – Challenges and Obstacles, Values, Attributes and Shortcomings – Navigating Campus Resources, Academic/Classroom Strategies
Week 4 – Skills to Enhance Learning
Week 5 – Goal Setting

In spring 2019, 25 first-year students out of 195 were required to attend “Fresh Start”. This was 12.8% of first year students (compared to 23% in spring 2018, 23% in spring 2017, 16% in spring 2016, 12.1% in spring 2015, 15% in spring 2014, 11.4% in spring 2013; and 13% in spring 2012). Nine (42%) ended the semester in good academic standing (Chico GPA above 2.0), 4 (19%) improved yet remain on academic probation, 1 (4.7%) students improved but are in DQ range, while 4 (19%) students’ GPA’s declined and are in DQ range. In addition, 2 (9.5%) students improved their Chico GPA’s and were offered academic contracts through Academic Advising Programs. One was an Institutional Contract and the other a Special Contract.  Overall, 16 (76%) of the students improved their GPA.

*Averages for Fresh Start 2019 are based on 21 total students, as four of the 25 required to attend did not enroll for the spring semester.

SLO #4 – As a result of participating in the Expanded Summer Bridge program, students requiring math remediation will either score high enough on the ELM to move up to the next level of math or satisfy the Early Start remedial math requirement completely. – In Summer 2018, EO665 was replaced with EO1110 which meant we no longer have the ELM or EPT for students to test on. EO 1110 focuses on multiple measures to place students in their respective English and math level. We now focus on students satisfying early start by taking a math and English component during Summer Bridge.

VI. Analysis

  • We need to continue to work with the entire team to help with transitions of new roles. The EOSP Director has been in a new position for only 2 months. The EOP Associate Director has been in her role for only one month. We need to organize to ensure appropriate workload and productivity. We are in the process of hiring an Admissions Specialist to start in the fall.
  • Continue to review program analysis and outcomes to align with GI 2025.
  • Since we are down an EOP Advisor, we are seeking a graduate intern to help with some of the projects and academic advising during drop-in times. This will alleviate some of the workload of the remaining staff.
  • Because of our lower incoming class numbers, EOP had to reduce one section of the Course Link offered to all incoming EOP first-time freshmen. These sections foster a sense of community and belonging and hopefully enhance our persistence rates.
  • EOP will need to readjust the number of seats we ask for in our Course Link sections as more students enter with college level credit coursework completed.
  • EOP has a commitment to the original ideals of the program. We will need to continue to maximize efforts to prioritize our exceptional admit pool.
  • Our EOP admissions process needs to keep pace with Admissions and Financial Aid timelines. Hiring supplemental assistance this past cycle was instrumental in meeting these deadlines. We will continue to look for ways to shorten the amount of time it takes to review files.
  • We need to continue to provide more resources for our second-year students. They will continue to work closely with our student intern staff, and utilize some of the components from our EOP/FYE model. Our Second Year Success Program will continue to need additional resources to focus on social activities and programming.
  • We need to focus more on life-after-college preparation for our students.
  • We need to continue to be more intentional about educating the campus community on who our students are and the services we provide.
  • As changes in remediation are implemented throughout the CSU system, we will need to anticipate how this will impact Summer Bridge and our first-time freshmen.
  • The Summer Bridge format needs to be evaluated now that we have implemented EO 1110 and there is no more assessments (ELM) to be given.
  • With the continued increase in first-generation college students and our program at capacity, we need to work with campus partners to find ways to serve more students overall.
  • EOP implemented various assessments of the first-year students to get a better understanding of how they feel about being a college student, support they have received and thoughts of their future. We collect data from four electronic surveys: Summer Bridge Assessment, Early-First-Semester Survey, End-of-First-Semester Survey, and End-of-First-Year Survey. Data from all surveys indicate a majority of students are feeling confident, positive, and supported through EOP’s efforts. Peer mentors (Summer Bridge Resident Advisors and Paraprofessionals) receive the highest praise, while the fall and spring course links, EOP staff and Summer Bridge Mentors are also held in high regard.

VII. Program Objectives For 2019-2020

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.
  2. Enhance contact and support of continuing students who are in good academic standing.
  3. Increase support for our first-year and second-year students through communication via electronic technology.
  4. Implement professional development and career readiness for our continuing EOP students.
  5. As a result of current staffing re-assignments, assess workloads and productivity and reorganize accordingly.

Foster Youth Program (Path Scholars)

I. Mission Statement

PATH Scholars, in conjunction with the campus Foster Youth Committee, is dedicated to the higher educational needs of former foster youth and unaccompanied homeless youth. We will enhance access to the California State University, Chico community through collaborative efforts with other college network and community partners. For those identified as former foster youth and unaccompanied homeless youth, we will develop stability by acting as a liaison with campus and community resources. Our goal is to cultivate successful, proficient, and self-aware citizens in pursuit of their degree.

Department Goals (Last reviewed June 2019)

  • Inform and educate the campus community about this population. (Division goal 1; University strategic priorities 1, 2, 4, 8)
  • Provide leadership and networking opportunities through campus and community collaboration. (Division goals 1, 2, 3; University strategic priorities 1, 4, 7, 8)
  • Increase access, retention and graduation rates for this population. (Division goals 1, 2, 3; University strategic priorities 1, 4, 8)

II. Departmental Accomplishments

  • Coordinated a summer program of events (Summer 2018) in collaboration with county partners (Butte County Office of Education, Champion Scholars, Butte County Independent Living Program, California Youth Connection – Butte Chapter, and Butte College Inspiring Scholars) to keep students engaged, connected, and to reduce isolation as the majority of students leave Chico during the summer months.
  • Special Welcome for new incoming students. Collected donations (college living essentials) for new incoming students via our Annual Donation Drive (August 2018). With these donations, program staff was able to provide Welcome Packages to new and current students.
  • Awarded Student Learning Fee funding ($26,000) for this academic year.
  • PATH Scholars was added to the Cal Fresh student eligibility exemption list, which exempts participants from the student work rule. This reduces barriers to students in need.
  • Received additional Walter S. Johnson Foundation (WSJF) Network funds ($4,875) for a student retreat and graduation related costs, which provided funds for cap and gown rental and university graduation application fees for six students.
  • Provided Christmas gifts to over 40 PATH Scholar students, in collaboration with The Salvation Army Angel Tree, the Chico State Wildcat Food Pantry, and Chico State’s Regional & Continuing Education.
  • Documentary screening, which highlighted PATH Scholar students to celebrate National Foster Care Month (May).
  • There were twenty-one PATH Scholar graduates this May! This is the highest number of graduating students since the program’s inception.

Highlights

  • Special Welcome for new incoming students: Transition to college life can be daunting, especially if you are doing it on your own, with little or no family support. Because of this, providing a special welcome is vital. In June 2018, PATH Scholars was selected as the focus for the service project component of Staff Development Day. This produced a variety of college living essentials for new students, such as bedding and personal care items. To supplement this, PATH Scholars hosted our second annual Donation Drive, and additional items were collected to make students feel comfortable and special in their new home. Donors included both on campus staff and faculty, as well as community members. A partnership drive, hosted by Bidwell Presbyterian Church, also produced many items for new students. To document this major milestone and accomplishment, the program collaborated with Chico State Creative Media and Technology to create a video of incoming students receiving welcome packages(opens in new window).
  • PATH Scholars awarded Student Learning Fee funding: The program received $26,000 for the 2018-19 academic year. This funding provided salaries for two part-time student staff to continue our Peer Coach model to support students on an individual basis, as well as four new computers for the PATH Scholars Center. Prior to this, the Center was using computers on loan from ITSS. New technology for the Computer Lab at the PATH Scholars Center was instrumental for students and their success in this academic year. Students’ primary reason for visiting the Center for the computer lab exceeded 50% for ten out of the 15 weeks of instruction for fall 2018. For spring 2019, students’ primary reason for visiting the Center for the computer lab exceeded 50% every week of the semester. This substantially demonstrates that the computer lab is a critical resource for PATH Scholar students. Additionally, students’ access to a Peer Coach is also a critical component of PATH Scholars. There were 91 active student participants in the program this academic year. Student staff serving as Peer Coaches meet with students individually and provide financial literacy skills as well as academic and emotional support. This allows the Program Coordinator to meet with other students that have higher needs. With this funding, the Peer Coaches completed 64 individual sessions with 23 students over the course of year. This provides significant support to the Program Coordinator, but more importantly, to the students that otherwise would not get this level of assistance. 
  • Documentary highlights PATH Scholar students: Two Chico State graduate students selected PATH Scholars for their community project. The primary focus of this venture was to increase awareness around students with a foster care and unaccompanied homeless background and how PATH Scholars supports them during their Chico State journey. The 24 minute documentary was screened on May 1st, kicking off National Foster Care Month on our Chico State campus.

Diversity Efforts 

  • Presented to several foster youth (from foster care agencies and schools throughout the state) in collaboration with Campus Special Tours.
  • Continued regular events with campus partners (Butte College and Shasta College) to strengthen transfer pipeline.
  • Services continue to be offered to older and re-entry students with a foster care background. There has been an increase in this student population seeking additional services as active PATH Scholars participants.

III. Changes In Policies And Procedures

Due to reaching maximum capacity from significant increase in student numbers and need, as well as limited staffing and resources, the Program Coordinator needed limit the number of students being admitted to PATH Scholars. The program will continue to be structured using a tier system – Tier I, to include students that have been verified with a foster care and/or unaccompanied homeless background and will continue to receive priority registration as well as useful information and resources; and Tier II, comprising of active students that submit an application packet and receive targeted, intrusive advising and case management services.  This year, the Program Coordinator admitted sixteen students (14-fall/2-spring) that demonstrated the greatest need and highest level of motivation to use their education to make a positive impact on their families and communities.

IV. Resources Summary

Resources Allocation

Johnson Foundation Implementation Grant allocation for 2018-2019$4,875
Roll forward from Johnson Foundation Implementation Grant allocation for 2017-2018  $12
General Fund allocation (transferred from EOP General Fund)   $3,445
Work Study allocation for 2018-2019$3,715
SLF Allocation (one-time)$26,470
Total Allocation$38,517
Projected Annual Expense($32,097)
Unused Work Study ($0)
Unused SLF funds ($4,369)
Projected Balance  $2,051

Note:  The Foster Youth Program was partially funded by the Walter S. Johnson Foundation (WSJF). Grant fiscal year is based on an October 1, 2018 – September 30, 2019 timeline.  Salary for the Foster Youth Program Coordinator is included within the EOP General Fund allocation.

Human Resources

     N/A

Facilities/Equipment

Space continues to be a challenge that is still pending to be resolved. Although we share a space with another program, we are not able to fully function in the capacity that best serves our students.  

V. Program Assessment Of Past Year

Program Objectives for 2018-2019:

  1. Continue to explore options for a permanent PATH Scholars Center.
    Ongoing – The Center is still in a shared location with another program, the Dream Center.  The current space configuration has created some challenges, especially around privacy. Because of this and other challenges, we continue to work with the VPSA’s office to identify a more permanent space. 
  2. Reactivate/revive campus Foster Youth Committee.
    Met – The Foster Youth Committee met twice during the spring 2019 semester. The first meeting included current members, but was also opened up to other campus professionals by way of Campus Announcements. This yielded several new members who were enthusiastic to support this student group. The Committee Chair and Program Coordinator updated the Committee, in terms of the PATH Scholars program, participating students, programming and current needs. Due to significant and continued program growth and need, the Committee agreed that it should evolve and be more action/task focused. During the second meeting, committee positions were selected and members volunteered for the various roles. Moreover, the Committee joined forces with Butte County Office of Education and Butte College Inspiring Scholars for a County Advisory Council to extend into the local community and leverage resources on a larger scale.
  3. Compare academic progress of Tier I participants vs. Tier II (active) participants.
    Met/Ongoing – First of all, a mechanism should be added to Advisor to identify/differentiate active/Tier II vs. Tier I. Since the numbers are relatively small (151), this process was completed manually. At the end of the spring 2019 semester, eleven percent of the Tier I students earned a cumulative GPA of below a 2.0 whereas it was slightly higher (14%) for the Tier II (active) group. Looking at cumulative GPA of 2.0 to 2.9, 59% of Tier I students comprise that category, with 46% of Tier II (active) in that same category. The most noteworthy is with students that earned above a 3.0 GPA. Forty percent (40%) of students in the Tier II (active) group have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above, whereas only 30% of students in the Tier I group have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above. This is the first year examining this data, so it will be important to continue looking at this trend.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts

Foster Youth/Unaccompanied Homeless Youth and Grade Levels

Grade Level

Spring 2017

Spring 2018

Spring 2019

Freshman

49 (35%)

38 (24%)

22 (14%)

Sophomore

29 (21%)

25 (16%)

33 (22%)

Junior

30 (22%)

45 (29%)

39 (26%)

Senior

31 (22%)

49 (31%)

57 (38%)

Total

139

157

151

Foster Youth/Unaccompanied Homeless Youth and Ethnicity

 

Spring 2017

Spring 2018

Spring 2019

White

55

58

62

Hispanic/Latino

31

36

39

Black/African American

19

27

22

Two or More Ethnicities/Race

24

29

19

Asian

5

3

5

Native Hawaiian/Other Pac Islander

3

2

0

American Indian/Alaska Native

1

1

2

Not Specified/Decline

1

1

2

Total

139

157

151

Foster Youth/Unaccompanied Homeless Youth and Term GPA

Term GPA

Spring 2017

Spring 2018

Spring 2019

Below 2.0

32 (24%)

23 (15%)

40 (27%)

2.0 – 2.99

48 (36%)

80 (51%)

55 (36%)

Above 3.0

53 (40%)

54 (34%)

56 (37%)

Total

133

157

151

Foster Youth/Unaccompanied Homeless Youth and Cum GPA

Cum GPA

Spring 2017

Spring 2018

Spring 2019

Below 2.0

14 (11%)

17 (11%)

19 (13%)

2.0 – 2.99

79 (59%)

86 (55%)

79 (52%)

Above 3.0

40 (30%)

54 (34%)

53 (35%)

Total

133

157

151

Cumulative GPA for First Time Freshman

Cum GPA for Freshman

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Below 2.0

11 (35%)

10 (29%)

7 (33%)

2.0 – 2.99

15 (48%)

16 (46%)

13 (62%)

Above 3.0

5 (16%)

9 (25%)

1 (5%)

Total

31

35

21

Tier II Student Retention Rates

Academic Year

Total Number of Students

Student Retention Rate

Graduates

2016/17 Tier II

55

94%

3

2017/18 Tier II

90

90%

15

2018/19 Tier II

91

89%

21

PATH Scholars Center Visits

 

Fall 2017

Spring 2018

AY Total

Number of Student Visits

617

801

1,418

 

 

 

Fall 2018

Spring 2019

AY Total

Number of Student Visits

589*

678

1,267

Note: *Time of campus closure due to Camp Fire.

Student Learning Outcomes

Note:  A Student Learning Outcomes survey was sent out at the end of the academic year to 91 students (Tier II/active). Twenty-seven students completed the survey (30% completion rate). The results of that survey inform the following:

SLO #1 – As a result of participating in the PATH Scholars Program, students will increase in their academic self-confidence and networking skills.

  • As a result of attending a PATH Scholars New Student Orientation and/or Welcome Reception (19 respondents), 74% of respondents stated that it was Extremely Helpful or Very Helpful to their overall success.
  • As a result of attending a PATH Scholars Academic Advising Success Workshop (17 respondents), 76% of respondents stated that it was Extremely Helpful or Very Helpful to their overall success.
  • As a result of attending PATH Scholars Networking Opportunities (18 respondents), 89% of respondents stated that it was Extremely Helpful or Very Helpful to their overall success.
  • As a result of attending a Cultural Activity (19 respondents) and/or a Social Activity (25 respondents), 79% of respondents and 68% of respondents stated that it was Extremely Helpful or Very Helpful to their overall success, respectively.

SLO #2 – As a result of participating in the PATH Scholars Program, students will develop and improve independent living skills, reducing their emotional stress and giving them more time to focus on academic goals.

  • As a result of attending PATH Scholars Independent Living Skills Workshops (14 respondents), 71% of respondents stated that it was Extremely Helpful or Very Helpful to their overall success.
  • As a result of working on Independent Living Skills during individual meetings with the Program Coordinator and/or a Peer Coach (21 respondents), 86% of respondents stated that it made a Significant Impact or Moderate Impact to their overall success.
  • As a result of learning and practicing healthy coping skills to manage stress during individual meetings with the Program Coordinator and/or a Peer Coach (22 respondents), 86% of respondents stated that it made a Significant Impact or Moderate Impact to their overall success.
  • As a result of participating in PATH Scholars (26 respondents), 23% of respondents stated that it Completely assisted in overcoming challenges, 38% of respondents stated that it Considerably assisted in overcoming challenges and 15% of respondents stated that it Moderately assisted in overcoming challenges.

VI. Analysis

  • Overall, students continue to utilize PATH Scholars and the resources available to them to reach their academic goals because this program connects with their foster care and/or unaccompanied homeless identity and experience. Ultimately, the goal is to increase access, retention and graduation rates, and this year proved hugely successful as twenty-one active students graduated. According to the Student Learning Outcome survey distributed after the end of this academic year, 85% are Very Satisfied or Moderately Satisfied with their PATH Scholars experience. One survey respondent stated, “PATH Scholars means THE WORLD to me. I am very appreciative of all the support I have gotten because I don't know where else it could have come from without this program”. Another student shared that PATH Scholars “means family and support for students who have faced adversity and have not had the real experience of healthy love”. To further demonstrate the tremendous need to support this student group, another participant poignantly states, “PATH Scholars empowers those who feel the most alone”.
  • The PATH Scholars Center continues to play a vital role in the success of the program goals. As described in the Highlights section, computer usage is one of the main reasons that students visit the Center. According to the Student Learning Outcome Survey results, 23 out of the 27 students that completed the survey stated that they used the computers at the PATH Scholars Center. One hundred percent of those 23 students indicated that access to those computers was Extremely Helpful or Very Helpful to their overall success. While students utilize the computer lab, meet with program staff and connect with their peers at the Center, a significant challenge continues with the current space being shared by two distinctive programs. The location divides PATH Scholars and the Dream Center with office partitions, which leads to high noise volume, limited student occupancy and lack of privacy and confidentiality, allowing opportunity to overhear sensitive conversations by both populations. Students from both programs have shared that they do not feel comfortable utilizing the Center due to these reasons. Ultimately, PATH Scholars needs a space solely dedicated to this program in order to effectively and appropriately serve this student group.
  • As student numbers and needs continue at significantly high levels, and program staff and resources remain the same, it is imperative that students also enroll in EOP. Many CSU Foster Youth Programs require that students enroll in both programs. However, due to early admission deadlines in EOP, the majority of foster youth miss those deadlines due to navigating the college application process with little to no support. The Program Coordinator will strengthen partnership with EOP to ensure that students are optimally supported.
  • In addition to ensuring that students receive effective support and services, it will also be important to closely review current student participation and evaluate student need. For example, some students on the active/Tier II list have not met all program requirements for various reasons, including but not limited to, an overcommitted schedule, success on their own or no longer interested or in need of high level services. Those students will be given an opportunity to stay on the current roster if they need. If the need is low to zero, students will be transferred to the Tier I list, where they will still receive priority registration and access to campus department liaisons. This frees up program staff time and resources to better assist and give more attention to students with the highest needs.
  • Next year should focus on reducing total numbers, while providing more one on one support to students who are struggling academically and have high needs. Equally as important, more targeted support is needed for first-time freshman as they transition to college life.

VII. Program Objectives For 2019-2020

  1. Continue to explore options for a permanent PATH Scholars Center that best meet the needs of the students.
  2. Launch Mentor Program with the assistance of a Mentor Coordinator (MSW Intern).
  3. Strengthen collaboration with EOP and SSS.

Student Learning Center

I. Mission Statement

The Student Learning Center (SLC) empowers CSU, Chico students to become independent thinkers and lifelong learners through the use of student-centered academic support in diverse, inclusive learning environments. The SLC is committed to purposeful outreach to underserved student populations, particularly first generation, low income college students and students with disabilities. Collaborating closely with faculty, academic departments, and student support programs, particularly the Educational Opportunity Program, we provide comprehensive academic support and skills development through Subject and Writing Center Tutoring, Supplemental Instruction (SI), and Study Skills Support. The SLC trains its student staff to provide outstanding academic support while developing their own content knowledge, leadership, and professional skills. As the highest volume peer led academic assistance center on campus, the SLC supports the University’s primary strategic priority with a focus on first-year, general education, and high stakes, bottleneck courses. 

Department Goals (Last Reviewed June 2019)

  • The Student Learning Center will provide individual and small group tutorials in undergraduate subject content areas, writing, and in learning strategies. (Student Affairs Goals 1, 2, 3; University Strategic Priorities 1, 4, 8)
  • The Student Learning Center will provide supplemental instruction for high-risk courses and EOP first year students. (Student Affairs Goals 1, 2, 3; University Strategic Priorities 1, 4, 8)
  • The Student Learning Center staff will cultivate working relationships with students, faculty, and staff that encourage effective communication and that are conducive to the delivery of services to students, faculty, and staff. (Student Affairs Goals 1, 2, 3; University Strategic Priorities 1, 2, 4)
  • The Student Learning Center staff will maintain top quality and current expertise in the field of learning assistance, writing, and supplemental instruction through professional reading, mediated resources, and other opportunities for professional development. (Student Affairs Goals 1, 2, 3; University Strategic Priorities 1, 2)

Contribution of Goals to Recruitment, Retention, and Graduation

The common factor of each of the SLC goals is to provide a high quality learning environment outside of the classroom that enhances student achievement and success.

Recruitment: The free academic support services offered by the SLC have been highlighted to prospective students by the Admissions Office, Summer Orientation, the Educational Opportunity Program, the Chico Student Success Center, and other admissions and recruitment programs on campus.

Retention: SLC goals serve to support student retention by helping students develop transferable, lifelong learning skills such as better understanding of specific course material, exam preparation, asking questions, memory techniques, and confidence. Our data shows that on average students who regularly visit tutoring and/or SI earn higher grades than those who do not.

Graduation: The overarching goal of the Student Learning Center is to help students who use the services graduate. By helping students build background knowledge and learning skills, the SLC develops student confidence, motivation, and persistence.

II. Departmental Accomplishments

  • The Student Learning Center had another record breaking year in the number of students and the number of visits in 2018-2019 with 4334 students using the SLC services 47,315 times.
  • The SI program has continued and strengthened its existing partnerships with the Biology Department and the Chemistry Department and expanded services in partnership with the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and the History Department.
  • The SI program secured professional development funds through the Student Learning Fee and granted the SI program $12,000 for the 2018-2019 academic year. The funds were spent on four professional development trips.
  • The SLC collaborated with the Math Department and the Meriam Library to continue services at the Math Learning Lab for drop in math tutoring, totaling 3,639 visits.
  • The Writing center showed an increase in freshmen users by 208% in academic year 2018-2019 (50 students in 2017-2018 to 154 students in 2018-2019).
  • The Writing Center continued collaboration with the Meriam Library to provide drop-in writing tutoring in the evening Monday through Thursday and in the afternoon on Sunday. A total of 127 unique students used this service, resulting in 179 visits.
  • The SLC was secured multiple Student Learning Fee grants for subject tutoring, SI professional development and college specific SI for the College of BSS and History Department totaling over $140,000.

Highlights

  • The Student Learning Center grew the professional staff with the addition of a part-time Tutor Coordinator Assistant position in spring 2019.
  • Successful collaboration and coordination with other departments across campus combined with enhanced outreach efforts led to another record breaking year in the number of students and visits to SLC services. Although last year, the streamlining of the SI expansion and increased student usage of the Math Learning Lab in the library led to a controlled number of tutoring appointments taking place in the SLC space, this academic year showed congestion and increased noise in the main center due to increase in student visits. The majority of weekly SI sessions were scheduled outside of the classroom adjacent to the SLC which reduced activity in the learning center, but continues other problems in terms of scheduling and consistency of location. The Math Learning Lab made math tutoring more accessible with extended hours and reduced the number of math tutoring sessions in the SLC main center space.
  • 2018-2019 showed continued success for the scope of the Supplemental Instruction (SI) offered through the SLC. The SI program overall demonstrated great success in both the number of students it served and the impact on their grades. Over the year, 3419 students attended SI sessions a total of over 23,494 times. On average, those that attended SI earned a half a grade higher than those who never attended. Those that attended SI consistently (eight or more times in a semester) earned a whole letter grade higher than those who never attended. The continued success of the SI program resulted in increased funding from the HSI STEM grant partners in Academic Affairs and the allocation of $100,000 of base funding from campus Student Learning Fee dollars.
  • Math and Writing Tutoring are now offered for drop-in tutoring every weekday and Sundays. A successful collaboration between Library Dean Patrick Newell, allowed the Math Department, Writing Center and the SLC to join forces to offer extended drop-in tutoring hours on the fourth floor of the Meriam Library. The more accessible location and hours expanded the availability of math and writing tutoring and resulted in a significant increase in both math and writing drop-in appointments.
  • The Student Learning Center professional staff participated in multiple professional development opportunities in 18-19. The Associate Director, SI Coordinator and Writing Coordinator completed three campus site visits to other CSU Learning Centers to identify promising best practices. The same team, along with the Tutor Coordinator Assistant, attended the annual ACTLA conference in Las Vegas. The SI Coordinator, along with multiple SI leaders, attended the Norcal Tutor Expo Conference and the Writing Coordination and multiple writing tutors attended the Northern California Writing Centers Association Conference.
  • The Associate Director was named chair of the Graduation Initiative subcommittee on Campus Student Success Centers and Support Programs. The subcommittee is focused on aligning learning assistance across campus and collaborating on training.

Diversity Efforts

  • The SLC student users are an increasingly diverse population. The SLC reports show the majority of student visitors as students of color (34% student users identified as white).
  • The SLC partnered with the Accessibility Resource Center to provide presentations on services during Summer Orientation sessions and promoted use of the Kurzweil software program in partnership with ARC/OATS to all new student staff employees during fall training.
  • During Chico State Giving Day, the SLC expanded the “Smart Snacks” program with the successful fundraising efforts totaling over $1,000. This addressed the needs of the increasing number of low income students with food insecurity who visit the SLC. We met the goal to expand the “Smart Snacks” program and regularly provide healthy alternative snack choices to the thousands of students who visit the SLC.
  • The Writing Center successfully ran a storytelling and writing workshop series called Hmong Legacy: My Culture, My Story in collaboration with the Cross Cultural Leadership Center and Asian and Pacific Islander Council for Hmong students and staff. Eight workshops were offered, each focusing on a different topic. Readings from Hmong authors and poets were also introduced and used as inspiration for discussions. The workshop series culminated in students, faculty and staff sharing their stories at a reading in the Valene L. Smith Museum of Anthropology in fall and the Bell Memorial Union in spring.
  • The Associate Director participated on a campus team for the Middle Leadership Academy (MLA), hosted by the CSU Student Success Network. The MLA team focused on enhancing campus equity initiatives to meet the needs of our diverse student population. Special focus was paid to interventions to assist students enrolled in courses with high DFW rates.
  • The SLC continued its expanded priority tutoring appointment sign-ups on the first Friday of each semester for students served by ARC and those in programs serving first generation, low income students including EOP, SSS, CSSC, REACH, and PATH, with the addition of our Dream student population.

III. Changes In Policies And Procedures

N/A

IV. Resources Summary

Resources Allocation

SLC annual allocation (lottery)     $118,000
SLC general fund allocation   $229,883
Rollover from 2015-2016 $19,000
One-time Student Learning Fee allocations   $150,736
University Foundation Governor’s Award$15,000
HSI STEM Grant $42,000
Total allocation for 2017-2018$575,421
Projected Annual Expense – SLC $496,217
Projected Balance $79,204

The Student Learning Center student salary budget increased as a result of two factors. First, Instructional Student Assistants (ISA’s) received a .50 per hour pay raise through the Unit 11 collective bargaining agreement. Second, the SLC increased the number of student staff and the number of hours due to the SI expansion and the extended hours of the Math Learning Lab. Thankfully, due to the influx of additional one time dollars, there was enough to cover all of the student salary costs. The SLC shows a significant surplus in funds because of unexpected one-time Student Learning fee dollars and additional work-study funding that was awarded late in the academic year and the full annual salary of the new SSP IA/B, who was not hired until April. Staff reductions and other cost saving measures were already enacted at the time of the unexpected additional funds. The SLC was unable to spend down the surplus dollars because the additional funding hit the budget late in the calendar year. Next year, the SLC will face an increase in student salary budget as ISA’s will be getting another .50/hour raise. Without return of surplus funding, the SLC will not be able to cover all of the student salary costs based on our projected budget because the completion of the Governor’s Award and no guarantee of continuing HSI STEM grant beyond fall. The Center will once again face difficulty in planning and implementing successful programs while managing resources effectively. This is especially true for SI. Planning SI, particularly for a semester where any growth to the program is anticipated, starts almost immediately the semester prior. Discussions with faculty and chairs/deans must begin months in advance in order for SI Leaders to be recruited, interviewed, and hired before finals week. Without stable funding, conversations about course support revolve around cobbling together available funding instead of around data on student need, student likelihood of participation, course design, and alternate academic supports in place.

Human Resources

  • There were significant changes in staffing in the SLC in 2018-2019. In 2016-2017 in response to the rapid expansion of Supplemental Instruction, the SI team grew from 29 leaders to 35 leaders and the addition of a graduate assistant position.
  • The Tutor Coordinator Assistant position was approved in fall 2018 and the new hire started in April of 2019. This new position allows for better oversight, supervision and tracking of subject tutoring services that were formerly the sole responsibility of the Associate Director. There is a great need to expand this part-time position to full time in order to meet the increased demands of ISA training, data tracking, service forecasting and certification compliance. The Center will work toward consistent work flow and identification of work duties, especially in the area of subject tutor coordination and supervision, which is an additional job duty for the Associate Director position. Efforts will continue to get the SLC staffed at a level commensurate with the volume of work; it is imperative that everything possible be done to avoid further turnover and/or loss of institutional knowledge.

Facilities/Equipment

  • The walls in the SLC were in desperate need of paint and was finally scheduled to receive a fresh coat of paint in the main area in late July 2018. Because of savings to the general fund from the SLF monies, old and broken large white boards were also replaced in spring 2019.
  • The SLC has over 40,000 visits per academic year and the chairs and materials are showing significant wear and tear. The front waiting room received a refresh in summer 2019 with new chairs, sofa and decorative hanging panels to separate the space between the waiting area and Writing Center.
  • There is a real need to replace the large, heavy tables in SSC 304, the classroom used for SI, SLC student staff training, and EOP Summer Bridge Study Skills. The tables in that room are awkward to move and restrict student interaction. Smaller, modular tables with wheels such as those used on the fourth floor of the library would allow for more flexibility in student interaction. A founding principle of SI is student-directed interactive learning and requires students to collaborate in small groups and to vary the modes of interaction. SSC 304 is the only classroom currently dedicated to a growing SI program and modular tables are needed for more effective collaborative learning activities. The return of surplus funds from this year can be used to address this issue.
  • A fundamental facility need for the SLC which has been a significant impediment to the successful growth of the SI program is classroom space. The SLC SI classroom, SSC 304, can accommodate approximately 50 hours a week, or the size of the SI program a year ago before the expansion. Spring 2019, we had SI sessions in more than 15 additional classrooms outside of SSC. This was a reduction in demand from space in the year before due to securing priority reservation over the SI classroom in SSC 304. However, to adequately support the current size of the SI program in fall 2019, or any further growth beyond that, we will need an additional dedicated classroom space.

V. Program Assessment Of Past Year

Program Objectives for 2018-2019

  1. Seek stable funding to maintain the quality and quantity of academic assistance offered by the SLC.
    Progress: SLC received significant one-time dollars for the AY 2018-2019, but only the part-time SSP IA/B salary is base funding. There is progress with the exploration of committed SLF monies on an annual basis of potentially $100,000.

Outside Funds for the SLC 2018-2019

Student Learning Fee - GE course subject tutoring $30,000
Student Learning Fee- Supplemental Instruction$100,000
Student Learning Fee – SI Professional Development  $12,000
Student Learning Fee- BSS partnership $8,736 
HSI STEM $42,000
University Foundation Governor’s Award$15,000 
$207,000
  1. Complete Supplemental Instruction Certification through University of Missouri-Kansas City
    Progress: Although the SI program has not accomplished its goal of acquiring UMKC SI Certification, it has increased alignment with UMKC Certification requirements. To gain certification, the SI program must average a 3 out of 5 on the UMKC Certification rubric. Through assessment, the program is aligning at a 4 out of 5 average at the moment for all criteria. After three consecutive semesters at this average score of 4 out of 5, the SI team will submit an application for certification.
  1. Showcase SLC services and effectiveness through enhanced campus outreach, partnerships, and programming
    Met: The SLC partnered with campus collaborators to showcase services in new faculty orientation, summer orientation, welcome week activities, student affairs tabling events, classroom presentations, participation on GI 2025 committee, summer institute on writing and various monthly tabling events.
  2. Provide in depth and more intentional writing training to writing tutors in order to provide better writing support to CSU, Chico’s growing first generation and Hispanic population.
    Met: Writing tutors received training in grammar and working with English language learners (ELL) so they can better serve ELL students. Tutors also received training on power and authority in peer tutoring to better understand the role they play in a writing session. These areas will be ongoing training and discussion topics.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts

Demographic Reporting

students by ethnicity 2018-2019: 40% of students are white and 1% are American indian

5 year demographic comparison: 2018-2019 has been the year with most students of color with over 2500 and 1500 white students

Note: In the past five years, the ethnic diversity of students who take advantage of SLC programs has changed significantly, reflecting the greater diversity of students attending CSU, Chico.

chart showing students by gender: 61% female and 39% male

Service Usage Summary

Total SLC Visits Comparison

slc student/visit comparison: throughout the years 2013-2019 the amount of student visits has increased. the years 2018-2019 over 45,000 students visited the center

Note: With the expansion of SI and the Math Learning Lab, the Student Learning Center had the highest number of students and visits in its history with a total of 4334 students visiting 47,315 times.

fist day tutoring sign ups: 2016-2017 was the lowest year with 1159. 2015-2016 was the highest year with 1456

Note: In 2018-2019, there was a significant increase in tutoring sign-ups, however, the Center was able to manage overly large waitlists because of the continuation of SI expansion and the Math Learning Lab in the library made more drop-in math help available, but reduced the number of math tutors offering appointments.

Student Satisfaction - Tutoring, Supplemental Instruction, Writing, and from Spring 2019 Surveys

student satisfaction survey

Note:  Our overall satisfaction rate is 96%.

Tutorial

subject tutoring students/visits 2018-2019: about 2500 students with 20000 visits 

Number of students receiving tutorial services/Number of courses tutored (Primary Goal 1)

Note: In 2018-2019, the number of students and visits for tutoring increased due to the expansion of the Math Learning Lab and increased hiring of subject tutors to reduce numbers on the waitlist.

Study Skills Workshops

study skills students/visits: for the year 2018-2019 there were 185 students with 537 visits

Note: SLC was not able to continue to coordinate study skills workshops or track attendance in 2016-2017, so no data is reported here for that year. SLC reduced the number of study skills workshops when other Student Affairs units (Career Center, Student Life & Leadership) increased their “Adulting 101” workshops.

Supplemental Instruction

Number of Students Attending Supplemental Instruction Sessions (Primary Goal 2)

student participation in supplemental instruction: for the year 2018-2019 in the fall semester there were 2080 students compared to 2090 in the spring semester

student visits to supplemental instruction: in the year 2018-2019 there were 10100 compared to 12000 in the spring semester

Grade Outcomes for SI Students Receiving SI Tutorial (Primary Goal 2)

fall 2018 SI grade comparisons: 0 visits 2 GPA, 1-4 visits 2.4 GPA, 5-9 visits 2.6 GPA and over 10 visits 2.8 GPA

Note:  In 2018-2019, the SI program continued expansion focused on providing support for STEM, BSS, and History courses with a special focus on bottleneck courses in chemistry, computer science, and biology. Students who participated in SI were far more likely to pass than those who did not, and those who attended SI regularly earned higher grades.

Writing Tutoring

Number of Students Participating In Writing Tutorials (Primary Goal 1)

writing students/visits comparison: in 2018-2019 there were 985 students with 1826 visits

Student Assessment of Satisfaction, Quality and Student Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

SLO #1: The Student Learning Center will offer services and programs that develop transferable learning skills that will enhance their academic and personal success both in and out of the classroom 

Top Five Study Skills Developed by Student Users

Subject Tutoring

Supplemental Instruction

Writing

Understanding of Course Material (95%)

Understanding of Course Material (86%)

Grammar (24%)

Exam Preparation (80%)

Exam Preparation (77%)

Organization (26%)

Asking Questions (58%)

Better Overall Study Habits (49%)

Citations/ Formatting (15%)

Motivation/Persistence (56%)

Predicting Test Questions (48%)

Developing/supporting ideas (18%)

Problem Solving (53%)

Memory Techniques (47%)

Understanding Assignment (17%)

Note: Each SLC program conducts ongoing assessment throughout each semester. Subject tutoring and SI conduct mid and end of semester surveys of students who use the services. This chart shows the top five skills students identified on the surveys for these three programs.

Qualitative Assessment of Student Skills:  Many of the comments on the student surveys of tutoring and SI give more insight into the specific benefits of academic assistance in helping students develop transferable learning skills, persistence, and confidence (see below). 

Subject Tutoring:

“I am very grateful to have the SLC. Al the tutors are so very helpful”

“Grateful to have a tutor guiding me through this class with patience and encouragement when I’m having trouble understanding a certain topic." 

“My tutor is always welcoming and very friendly and approachable and I look forward to coming and going to the tutor session with her.”

Supplemental Instruction (SI):

"I learned a lot about improving my study habits! Hearing concepts in a new way was super helpful and my leader’s explanations were always understandable and applicable! A huge asset to my chemistry grade.”

“SI helped me so much this semester. It helped me study for my quizzes, my midterm, and my finals. Without SI I don't know how I would have passed my history class. It made everything so much clearer and I understood everything.”

“GO [to SI]! You will gain important study strategies and create a stronger network within the class with your classmates.”

Writing Center:

“The Writing Center is amazing, more students should use this service. I never thought I would be able to write at such a high level before.

“She shared helpful feedback and kindly told me areas that I could focus on to improve my work. She was open to questions and was overall interested in helping me with my science paper.”

“My tutor was awesome! She helped talk me through my ideas and put our conversation on paper. She helped me get started and assisted me when I got stuck. We talked it out when I was having trouble expressing my ideas.” 

“Thank you! I appreciate the time and effort you put in to helping me prepare for graduate school admissions. Your feedback was specific and showed how much you care about your job and the people you help.” 

SLO #2: The Student Learning Center will develop the professional and lifelong learning skills of its student staff through training, mentoring, and ongoing feedback.

Top Five Professional Skills Developed by SLC Student Staff (all programs)

top skills developed by SLC staff: 93 patience, 88 listening, 80 validating, 77 motivating, 76 encouraging

VI. Analysis

  • The rapid expansion of the SI program the past three years showed promising results, but the success of the SI program next year and in future years depends on resolving a few key issues. One of these issues is the lack of support regarding data analysis. The success of an evidence based practice such as SI depends on current, actionable data to inform decision making about course offerings and method of implementation. Through monthly CSU system-wide meetings and webinars, SLC staff have discovered that several other CSUs have shared close collaborations with Institutional Research departments leading to increased student success, cost-effective implementations, enhanced funding opportunities, and submissions of articles to peer reviewed publications. A second key issue is consistent, designated classroom space for SI in addition to SSC 304. With the support of Provost Larsen, we are now able to request classrooms before the first week of school but after courses have been scheduled. This allows the schedule to be made in time to start SI the second week of the semester, but it still leaves us with an issue of being spread out across campus in a dozen different classrooms. As a voluntary program that is not listed on students’ portal, consistency and ease of access is essential to high participation rates. The most urgent issue for both SI expansion and the effectiveness all of the Student Learning Center programs is stable, consistent funding.
  • With the Chancellor’s Office enforcement of EO1110 and GI 2025, the Student Learning Center now has increased demand for developmental GE Math and composition courses, courses with significant equity gaps and high DFW rates. Close coordination with multiple campus partners will need to happen in order for the SLC to deliver these services and not reduce learning assistance to other courses and departments.
  • The Student Learning Center had five full time career staff and one half time career staff by spring 2019 for the first time in its history which will definitely help each program begin the year with adequate support. The rapid growth and inconsistent staffing of the SLC in the past few years has created many challenges. Increased collaboration has made expansion possible, but also potentially less stable. Increasing services based on one time funding is not sustainable. Consistent funding and support is essential for the program to be successful in helping CSU, Chico meet the ambitious targets of the CSU Graduation Initiative.

VII. Program Objectives For 2019-2020

  1. Seek stable funding to maintain the quality and quantity of academic assistance offered by the SLC.
  2. Complete Supplemental Instruction Certification through University of Missouri-Kansas City
  3. Showcase SLC services and effectiveness through enhanced campus outreach, partnerships, and programming
  4. Provide in depth and more intentional training for both student staff and professional staff in the areas of learning assistance and learning theory.
  5. Pilot a synchronous online tutoring program in Writing Center to serve distance learners, learners with diverse needs that cannot be accommodated by current Writing Center services.

Trio/Educational Talent Search

I. Mission Statement

Educational Talent Search (ETS) is committed to academically prepare and motivate low-income, first-generation college students for success in postsecondary education. 

The Educational Talent Search program is aligned with CSU, Chico’s Mission, Values and Vision statements and the first strategic priority to “recruit, enroll, support, and graduate a diverse and high-quality student population.”

History at California State University, Chico

Educational Talent Search I (Funded in 1990 to serve 825 students) - the target population is comprised of students in grades 6 -12 who attend 15 target schools (Anna McKenney Intermediate, Bidwell Junior, Central Middle, CK Price Intermediate, Gray Avenue Middle, Las Plumas High, Live Oak High, Live Oak Middle, Marsh Junior High, Marysville High, Orland High, Oroville High, Pleasant Valley High, Willows High and Yuba City High) in four counties (Butte, Glenn, Sutter and Yuba).

Educational Talent Search II (Funded in 2006 to serve 503 students) - the target population is comprised of students in grades 6 -12 who attend 8 target schools (Chico Junior, Chico High Gridley High, Hamilton Elementary, Hamilton Union High, Los Molinos High, Paradise High, and Williams Junior/Senior High) in five counties (Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Sutter and Tehama).

Department Goals (Performance Objectives required by the U.S. Department of Education)

Program Objectives:

  1. Secondary School Persistence: 90% of non-senior participants served each project year will complete the current academic year and continue in school for the next academic year, at the next grade level.
  2. Secondary School Graduation:
  • 85% of seniors served during the project year will graduate during the project year with a regular secondary school diploma within the standard number of years. 
  • 40% of seniors served during the project year will complete a rigorous secondary school program of study and will graduate during the project year with a regular secondary school diploma within the standard number of years.
  1. Postsecondary Education Enrollment: 75% of participants, who have graduated with a regular secondary school diploma, during the project year, will enroll in an institution of higher education by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or will have received notification, from an institution of higher education, of acceptance but deferred enrollment until the next academic term (e.g., spring term) 
  1. Postsecondary Attainment: 40% of participants served during the project year who enrolled in an institution of higher education by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or by the next academic term (e.g., spring term) as a result of acceptance but deferred enrollment will complete a program of postsecondary education within six years.

II. ETS Accomplishments

  • Vanessa Ramirez, Academic Coordinator – after seven years of unwavering dedication to the ETS program and students, Vanessa has accepted a position with the Council for Opportunity in Education in Washington, DC. We are sad to see Vanessa leave our program, but we are excited for Vanessa’s next chapter in her career, especially because she will still be part of our TRIO family serving with the organization that lobbies for TRIO programs nationwide.
  • New Advisor – Kelsey Dixon joined the ETS family in December ready to fulfill her responsibilities and grateful for the opportunity to serve students. Kelsey is a graduate of CSU, Chico with a Bachelor of Arts in Recreation Administration. 
  • Successfully recruited and served 1,336 students in grades 6th-12th at 23 target schools – low-income, first generation college students are motivated and prepared to attend college starting in 6th grade! On the average, approximately 70-90 ETS students enroll at CSU, Chico each fall.
  • Monthly Workshops – ETS advisors visit their assigned schools each month and present workshops according to grade level on topics such as college requirements, transcript review, career/major awareness, personal growth, ACT/SAT preparation, scholarships, personal statements, and financial literacy. In addition, advisors guide seniors step-by-step through the college, financial aid, and educational support programs (EOP, SSS, EOPS and REACH) processes and applications.
  • Conferences hosted at CSU, Chico – students attended hands-on workshops at CSU, Chico facilitated by university faculty/staff, volunteers and students.
    • Senior Admissions Seminar (109 students) – representatives from UC Davis, CSU Chico, and Butte College presented to students about admissions, EOP/EOP&S, financial aid, scholarships and studying abroad. Sam Blanco III, director of TRIO programs at UC Davis, spoke to students about his journey to college as well as struggles and how leaning on those that supported him made a difference in his college experience.

TRIO studentsTRIO staff member

Pictured left: ETS students attending Senior Admissions Seminar
Pictured right: Sam Blanco III, keynote speaker, at Senior Admissions Seminar

  • Spring into Your Future (30 students) – through a collaboration with the CSU, Chico Office of Admissions, students visited the Chico State campus. Students attended an admissions presentation, toured the recording arts studio, and ended the day with a tour of the Chico State Farm.  Students had lunch in the Sutter residential dining center with ETS alumni from Chico State that shared about their college experience.

TRIO students

Pictured left: ETS students listening to an admissions presentation
Pictured center:  ETS students touring the recording arts studio
Pictured right:  ETS students touring the Chico State Farm

  • Junior Success Seminar (80 students) – Study Smart Tutors Inc., presented ACT and SAT test preparation in an interactive and academically challenging way. They gave students tips and explained what to expect on the test so they are better prepared for when they take it. 

TRIO students

Pictured left:  ETS students attending the ACT/SAT workshop at Junior Success Seminar
Pictured right:  ETS students attending Junior Success Seminar 

  • STEM Academy (117 students) – in collaboration with the CSU, Chico student organization Latinos in Technical Careers and the Foor Foundation, 6th- 9th grade students experienced hands on, interactive workshops presented to motivate them to attend college and pursue a STEM career.  Students attended workshops where they built rockets, bridges and towers, learned about circuits, and put together solar cars.  Prior to the conference, students submitted essays on if they had the chance to be cybernetically enhanced, what body part they would pick to enhance their daily life.  The three strongest essays were awarded a drone, tablet, or coding game.

TRIO students

Pictured top left: ETS student learning about circuits
Pictured top center: ETS students waiting to launch the rocket they built
Pictured top right: ETS students building bridges and towers
Pictured bottom left: ETS students building bridges and towers
Pictured bottom center:  STEM Academy group picture
Pictured bottom right:  ETS students awarded a tablet, drone and coding game for their essays 

  • Jumpstart (will be hosted on August 13, 2019) – the ETS Alumni Association and ETS staff will welcome first time freshman attending college in the fall. Workshops will include the difference between college and high school, advising resources, financial aid/budgeting, how to thrive as a college student, a student panel and available resources on college campuses to promote academic success. 

College Visits (83 students) – students in 11th and 12th grade visited UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Merced, Sonoma State, CSU, Stanislaus, and Fresno State, explored Yosemite National Park and walked across the Golden Gate Bridge during two college visits.

ETS students at Yosemite National Park

ETS students touring UC, Davis

Pictured left: ETS students at Yosemite National Park

Pictured right: ETS students touring UC, Davis

ETS students touring UC, Berkeley

ETS students touring UC, Berkeley

Pictured above: ETS students touring UC, Berkeley

Summer Programs

  • Butte College Summer Connection (125 students total, 86 ETS students):  in collaboration with Butte College, students participated in a three-week academic program offered to students in grades 6th- 9th.  The mission of Summer Connection is to provide the students with a real-life college experience through a student learning outcome based curriculum.  Courses taught were Career and Life Planning, Multicultural History, MakerSpace, Engineering, Embracing your Roots, and College 101.  Each group was mentored by CSU, Chico and Butte College students that provide positive role models and inspired students to attend college.

Pictured left: ETS student designing a bridge in the Engineering class  Pictured center: ETS student sharing family tree from Embracing Your Roots class Pictured right: ETS students putting together a puzzle that becomes a functioning bench made in the MakerSpace lab

Pictured left: ETS student designing a bridge in the Engineering class
Pictured center: ETS student sharing family tree from Embracing Your Roots class
Pictured right: ETS students putting together a puzzle that becomes a functioning bench made in the MakerSpace lab

Pictured top left: ETS student designing a bridge in the Engineering class  Pictured top center: ETS student sharing family tree from Embracing Your Roots class Pictured top right: ETS students putting together a puzzle bench in MakerSpace Pictured bottom center:  ETS students at Summer Connection program

Pictured top left: ETS student designing a bridge in the Engineering class
Pictured top center: ETS student sharing family tree from Embracing Your Roots class
Pictured top right: ETS students putting together a puzzle bench in MakerSpace
Pictured bottom center:  ETS students at Summer Connection program

  • Upward Bound Math/Science (36 students):  four to six week long summer academic programs designed to give students a college experience, develop academic skills, and excel in the fields of math and science. 
  • CSU, Chico Upward Bound Math/Science –  23 students
  • Monterey Peninsula College Upward Bound Math/Science (hosted at UC, Santa Cruz)– 2 students
  • UC, Berkeley Upward Bound Math/Science – 11 students

Support of Paradise Students – raised $4,400 to donate to 38 Paradise ETS students affected by the Camp Fire.  Expressed our gratitude for having them as a part of our ETS family and reminded them we will always be there to support them to attain their personal and educational goals.  Each gift included a handmade card, $100 cash, Amazon and Target gift cards, ETS t-shirt, Kleen Kanteen and a Paradise Strong sticker.

Paradise High students

Pictured right:  Paradise High students

Scholarships – ETS staff fundraised to award four $300 scholarships that were awarded to students who will attend various institutions across California.  The four awardees were:

  • Alexandra Corona, Gridley High School
  • Ofelia Flores-Rodriguez, Hamilton High School
  • Leslie Hernandez-Camarena, Hamilton High School
  • Rosalinda Ramos-Hernandez, Hamilton High School

Cash for College – in collaboration with our target high schools, CSU Chico, Butte College and Yuba College Financial Aid, we co-hosted ten Cash for College events where over 400 students and parents received information on financial aid.  Most students submitted their FAFSA applications on the spot after their questions were answered.  

Friend of ETS Awards – given to Pedro Caldera (Chico Junior High), Lupe Haro (Gridley High), Mary Leonardo (Orland High), and Melissa Plants (Pleasant Valley High) for their never-ending dedication and support of the program. 

Leadership Positions held by ETS Staff –

  • Kelsey Dixon – 1st Gen & Proud committee member
  • Larly Lee– NorCal WESTOP Technology Chair
  • Diana Parra-Villaseñor – Chicano Latino Council Member; elected Chicano Latino Council Vice Chair; Bienvenida planning committee member
  • Vanessa Ramirez – NorCal WESTOP President Elect
  • Aurora Ruvalcaba – Women of Excellence committee member; co-lead facilitator at Women of Excellence roundtable discussion; elected Chicano Latino Council social chair
  • Yolanda Salazar-Garcia – 1st Gen & Proud committee member; NorCal WESTOP scholarship committee member

Diversity Efforts:

  • Assure hiring practices and current staff reflect diverse student population in program and on campus – our professional staff is comprised of five female Latinas, one Caucasian female, and a Hmong male which is representative of both our program and campus population.
  • Develop and implement diversity awareness curriculum for ETS students – staff is creating diversity awareness curriculum and activities to share/celebrate various cultures
  • Maintain relationship with Mechoopda tribe to prepare and motivate their students for higher education – staff continues to communicate with the Mechoopda tribe to best serve their students. The students were invited to apply for our program, attend the STEM Academy and the Butte College Summer Connection program.  Diana Parra-Villaseñor also volunteered at the Native American Graduation celebration.

III. Changes In Policies And Procedures

There were no changes in policies and procedures.

IV. Resources Summary

Resource Allocation – ETS completed the third year of a five-year 2016-2021 grant cycle.  For 2018-2019, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 provided an additional $60 million to Federal TRIO Programs  for a total Fiscal Year 2018 appropriation of $1.01 billion.  The United States Department of Education used these funds to provide a 4.25 percent increase from 2017 funding levels.  Both CSU, Chico ETS grants were funded $681,145 annually to serve 1,328 students ($513 a student).  We are able to successfully serve students on a very limited budget. 

Human Resources – Leah Slem, ETS advisor accepted a position with CSU, Chico Student Support Services in August 2018.  Kelsey Dixon was hired as an ETS advisor in December 2018.

Vanessa Ramirez – ETS Academic Coordinator, accepted a position with the Council for Opportunity in Education in June 2019.  With the increase in funding, two ETS advisors will be hired in August.

V. Program Assessment Of Past Year

The following Annual Objectives data corresponds to the 2017-2018 academic year.  Due to the U.S. Department of Education reporting requirements, Educational Talent Search grantees complete annual reports in November, therefore 2018-2019 data is not yet available.  All other information included in this report corresponds to the 2018-2109 academic year.

Program Objectives:

  1. Secondary School Persistence: 90% of non-senior participants served each project year will complete the current academic year and continue in school for the next academic year, at the next grade level. 

Exceeded – 100% of non-senior participants completed the current academic year and continued in school the next academic year, at the next grade level.

  1. Secondary School Graduation:
  • 85% of seniors served during the project year will graduate during the project year with a regular secondary school diploma within the standard number of years.

Exceeded – 100% of seniors graduated with a regular secondary school diploma

  • 40% of seniors served during the project year will complete a rigorous secondary school program of study and will graduate during the project year with a regular secondary school diploma within the standard number of years. 

Exceeded – 76% of seniors that graduated completed a rigorous secondary school program of study

  1. Postsecondary Education Enrollment: 75% of participants, who have graduated with a regular secondary school diploma, during the project year, will enroll in an institution of higher education by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or will have received notification, by the fall term immediately following high school, from an institution of higher education, of acceptance but deferred enrollment until the next academic term (e.g., spring term).

Exceeded – 96% of participants, who have graduated with a regular secondary school diploma, enrolled in an institution of higher education the fall term immediately following high school graduation.

  1. Postsecondary Attainment: 40% of participants served during the project year who enrolled in an institution of higher education by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or by the next academic term (e.g., spring term) as a result of acceptance but deferred enrollment will complete a program of postsecondary education within six years.

Exceeded – 56% of participants served in the 2011-12 postsecondary enrollment cohort earned a credential.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts:

Annual Objectives for 2018-2019 Demographic Reporting

For the 2018-2019 academic year, 1,336 students were served by two ETS grants.  Below is a demographic snapshot of the ethnicity of our student population, which is reflective of the schools we serve. 

Educational Talent Search Ethnicities 2018-2019: highest is latino with 793 and lowest is pacific islander with 9

Educational Talent Search Ethnicities 2018-2019

Total

Latino

Caucasian

Asian

African American

Native American

Two or More Races

Pacific Islander

1336

793

270

202

28

22

12

9

VI. Analysis

Our program’s goals are to academically prepare and motivate low-income, first generation youth for success in post-secondary education.  We constantly evaluate our program to best serve our student’s needs. Our ongoing assessment efforts include; an annual performance report to the U.S. Department of Education, evaluations from students on every event they attend, and an overall program evaluation before students graduate.  After closely assessing the program, we meet in June to plan for the following year.

ETS college enrollment rates for the past six years

 

Academic Year

 

 Students Served

 

Seniors

 

Seniors that Applied to Financial Aid

 

Seniors Enrolled in Postsecondary Education

 

2017-2018

1,387

259

253 = 98%

249 = 96%

2016-2017

1,360

281

271 = 96%

261 = 93%

2015-2016

1,355

299

287 = 96%

272 = 91%

2014-2015

1,414

285

279 = 98%

263 = 92%

2013-2014

1,306

268

260 = 97%

244 = 91%

2012-2013

1,363

291

278 = 96%

248 = 85%

2011-2012

1,309

321

302 = 94%

289 = 90%

  • A successful Annual Performance Report was submitted to the Department of Education where all program objectives were met! The six year postsecondary completion for the 2011-2012 cohort was 56%.
  • This year was extremely difficult for the community due to the devastating Camp Fire. We are proud of the fact that we were able to support our students, families, schools, campus, community, and staff despite the tremendous adversity.

VII. Program Objectives For Next Academic Year

  • Submit a successful Annual Performance Report to the Department of Education where all program objectives are met. 
  • Meet with Michael Thorpe from CSU, Chico Risk Management to assure our program practices are in compliance with university regulations.
  • Create a “roadmap to success” for ETS alumni that enroll in college.

VIII. ETS Staff

ETS staff

  • Diana Parra-Villaseñor, Director
  • Yolanda Salazar-Garcia, Assistant Director
  • Aurora Ruvalcaba, Administrative Assistant
  • Vanessa Ramirez, Academic Coordinator
  • Kelsey Dixon, Advisor
  • Larly Lee, Advisor
  • Sandra Torres, Advisor
  • Erica Mercado, Student Assistant
  • Mariam Yousif, Student Assistant

Trio/Student Support Services

Note:  Student Support Services is a TRIO program funded by the United States Department of Education to provide academic support services to low-income, first generation college students.  The mission statement and program goals (objectives in the U.S. Department of Education framework) are specified by federal regulations and policies and cannot be altered without approval from a program officer at the U.S. Department of Education.

I. Mission Statement

The mission of Student Support Services (SSS) is to improve the academic standing, retention, graduation, and graduate and professional school enrollment rates of eligible students who are receiving project services. 

Department Goals

Performance Objectives (required by the U.S. Department of Education)
  1. Persistence: 69% of all students served by the SSS Project will persist from one academic year to the beginning of the next academic year or graduate.
  2. Good Academic Standing: 91% of all enrolled participants served by the SSS Project will meet the performance of good academic standing (2.0 or above).
  3. Graduation: 59% of new participants served each year will graduate within six years.
  • These performance objectives are in alignment with division goals to increase the retention and graduation of students.
  • The services offered by SSS also contribute to recruitment efforts by reassuring students and their families that individualized support is available to students from disadvantaged backgrounds at CSU, Chico.
  • The date of last reviewwas March 21, 2019 when the project submitted the TRIO Student Support Services Annual Performance Report (APR) to the U.S. Department of Education.

II. Departmental Accomplishments

  • Successfully hired and on-boarded new Student Development Coordinator.
  • Adopted the term “financial wellness” in lieu of “financial literacy.”
  • Implemented a $2500 grant from the Student Learning Fee committee to help offset the cost of the online financial wellness program.  
  • Pilot Spring 2019 – Offered participants an undergraduate research course that was co-taught with library faculty titled “Leadership Through Scholarship and Service.” Students earned two units through RHPM.
  • Required that all first-year participants, new transfer students, and students on AP take the LASSI online assessment and follow it up with a one-on-one coaching session with a peer coach to discuss improving their approaches and strategies to their studies using proven-effective practices.
  • Required attendance at mandatory financial wellness workshops for all first year students and second year students.
  • Offered mandatory “Fresh Start” workshop for first year TRIO-SSS participants on academic probation.
  • Offered mandatory fall semester seminar course for first year participants.
  • Offered mandatory weekly study sessions for all first-year participants.
  • Offered one eight-week SSS Student Transfer Enrichment Program (STEP).
  • Offered a one-week SSS Freshman Orientation Centered on University Success (FOCUS), running it alongside Wildcat Welcome Week.
  • Offered one field school experience for first year participants, facilitated by the department of Recreation, Hospitality, and Parks Management.
  • Required participation in service-oriented field schools, facilitated by the department of Recreation, Hospitality, and Parks Management of all Participants in the “Leadership Through Scholarship and Service.”
  • Offered a spring graduate school tour with the CSU Graduate Diversity Forum.
  • Offered a one-day “Life After College” workshop for graduating seniors.

Highlights:

Coaching program continues to enhance academic performance –  

Beginning in the summer of 2015, the project moved from a traditional advising model to a coaching model, using research-driven approaches designed to “nudge” students toward academic self-confidence and success (see Annual Report 2015-16). Four years into this intrusive approach, we continue to see improved academic performance.

Figure 1:  Average Cumulative GPAs Comparison of All Active Participants 2011-2018

the average GPA comparison for 2018-2019 is 2.98

Figure 2: Academic Performance - First year participants Participating in FOCUS

cumulative GPA average 1sy year by Cohort: cohort 15 reach pilot is 3.2 average gpa

Financial Wellness Program – All first year participants, new transfer students, sophomores, and juniors/seniors on “Career Track” and “Grad School Track” were required to work one-on-one with a financial literacy coach in 2018-19. First year participants with a summer start (FOCUS) received more comprehensive and intrusive programming than other participants—they had two required phone coaching sessions over the summer, attended four financial literacy workshops during the fall semester, and learned to utilize an Excel budgeting tool. Sophomores were required to attend a four-week in-person financial literacy workshop.  Junior and senior participants in Career Track/Grad School Track met one-on-one with the financial literacy coach. Graduating seniors who participated in the annual Life After College seminar received training in budging for the first year after college, as well as building wealth.

Results – First year and second year participants in 2018-19 were successful in reducing their loan debt over previous cohorts.  The number of participants ending their first year debt free increased from 35% (Cohort 2017) to 67% (Cohort 2018).  This is the highest number of first year participants ending their first year debt free since we begin tracking this data in 2012.  First year students who did take out student loans their first semester borrowed less, reducing their average loan amount by $1,635 in spite of fee increases!  They also borrowed $1,100 less on average from unsubsidized loans. Second year student data from 2018-19 was less impressive; they borrowed slightly more than second year students in 2017-18.  However this cohort is still strong in comparison with earlier years, with 50% of participants ending their second year debt free, as compared with 22% in 2011-12, and they are borrowing less than in previous years, as well ($1,797 less than in 2011-12, in spite of several fee increases over the years). Please refer to figures 3-7 to see this data tracked over time. 

82% of our first year participants and 89% of our second year participants finished out the 2018-19 academic year with money in their bank accounts. 88% of first year participants and 90% of second year participants reported that they revised their budget more than once during the academic year using the tools we provided. On their evaluations, 100% of the first and second year participants who utilized the curriculum reported that the financial literacy curriculum and coaching (1) positively impacted their budgeting skills, (2) influenced them to reduce or eliminate debt and (3) contributed to their overall success as student in 2018-19.

Figure 3: Debt-Free First Year participants at End of Year, FOCUS Cohorts 2011-2018

cohort 18 % of debt free end of 1st year is 67%

Figure 4:  Average Debt Acquired by FOCUS Cohorts 2011 –2018

average loans 1st year for cohort 15 it was $1,043

Figure 5:  Average Debt Acquired by 1st Year Participants Who Borrowed (i.e. participants who declined student loans) in FOCUS Cohorts 2011 – 2018

cohort 16 was the highest average debt acquired by 1st year participants with average borrowed of $5,190

Figure 6:  Average Debt Acquired in 2nd Year by FOCUS Cohorts 2011 – 2017

Average Debt Acquired in 2nd Year cohort 2011 was the highest with $3,641

Figure 7: Second Year Participants Who Declined Loans in 2018-19

cohort 2017 50% of participants declined loans compared to cohort 2016 that was 62%

Diversity Efforts:

  • Inclusion efforts - male participants – In 2016, the project director modified internship requirements to ensure gender diversity among project staff so that male participants will see themselves reflected in project leadership. Result – Male students on the project’s leadership team increased from one male in 2016 to six males in 2018-19. The overall percentage of male participants in the project also increased by 4% from the year we set this initiative (spring 2016).
  • Inclusion efforts - Latinx students – Culturally inclusive approaches were included in FOCUS, including Spanish speaking staff and welcome baskets delivered to students by SSS mentors. Latinx students are contacted in advance and encouraged to bring their parents to meet project staff.
  • Campus Collaboration, Representation, and Outreach
    • WESTOP 2019 – The project director presented on the project’s life after college programming (e.g. contracts, seminars, and Distinguished Scholar) and financial wellness program at the WESTOP 2019 regional conference.
    • The CSU Chico “Tipping Point” – The project director presented on first generation student needs to the campus community. In attendance were the University’s President, Vice President for Student Affairs, and Provost.
    • Pause 2019 – The project director co-presented with the director of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion on first gen student statistics and needs.
    • PDS 2019 – The student development coordinator and lead peer coach co-presented on the project’s financial wellness and retention programs at WESTOP’s 2018 Professional Development Workshop.
    • Diversity Certificate – The project director co-presented on first generation students’ needs and challenges to faculty and staff at the Diversity Certificate program, along with the interim associate director of HSI initiatives and the associate director of the Financial Aid and Scholarships Office.
    • 1st Gen House – The project director conducted two workshops at the campus’ first ever 1st Gen House residence hall; one financial wellness workshop and one cultural adaptation workshop.
    • Student Learning Center – The project director conducted a staff development workshop for student staff at the Student Learning Center, as well as a financial wellness workshop.
    • Men of Chico – The project director gave a financial wellness workshop to the Men of Chico cohort 2018.
    • First Gen & Proud! – The project director served as secretary for the First Generation Faculty and Staff Association.

III. Changes in Policies and Procedures

   N/A

IV. Resources Summary

Budget Summary:

  • SSS allocation for 2018-19:    $272,494
  • Rollover from 2017-18:           $23,809
  • Total allocation for 2018-19:   $296,303
  • Projected expenses*:            ($281,000)
  • Projected carryover balance:     $15,303

*Note:  Fiscal year is based on a September 1, 2018 - August 31, 2019 timeline.

Staffing:

 N/A

Facilities/Equipment:

N/A

V. Program Assessment of Past Year

Program Objectives (Performance Objectives required by the U.S. Department of Education)

  1. Persistence: 69% of all students served by the SSS Project will persist from one academic year to the beginning of the next academic year or graduate.

Of the 149* participants enrolled in 2018-19, 145 or 97% either graduated or have registered for the fall 2019 semester.

  1. Good Academic Standing: 91% of all enrolled participants served by the SSS Project will meet the performance of good academic standing (2.0 or above).

Of the 149* participants enrolled in 2018-19, 140 or 94% were in good academic standing (GPA above 2.0) by the end of the academic year. 

  1. Graduation: 59% of new participants served each year will graduate within six years.

Of the 23 participants admitted into cohort 2013, 16 or 70% graduated within six years of their point of entry into the program.

*This does not include new first year participants or transfer participants admitted summer 2018.

Program Annual Objectives for 2018-19

  1. Require first year students to participate in a second semester experience, which will include the undergraduate research unit, financial literacy, and a “leadership through scholarship” unit. This will be co-developed and taught by the project’s student development advisor, project director, and a faculty member from Meriam Library.  The project director will analyze the impact of this intervention using qualitative data (student evaluations) and quantitative data (participants’ grades in courses requiring research papers).

Outcome: Modified yearlong component to “optional.” Completed fall 2018.

  1. Divide the Career Track contract to create two separate contracts – (1) Career Track for students who are researching their career opportunities and preparing to apply for career level positions and (2) Grad School Track for students who are researching graduate school opportunities and funding, preparing for the GRE, and in the application phase. The project director will analyze the impact of this change using qualitative data (student evaluations). 

Outcome: Completed Fall 2018

  1. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data to assess the impact of the
    sophomore contracts on student success in the following areas: 
  • cumulative GPAs
  • academic self-confidence
  • academic motivation
  • connection between their college degree and “real world” goals
  • financial literacy

Implement programmatic changes accordingly. 

Outcome: Completed July 2019

VI. Ongoing Assessment Efforts

Demographic Reporting

Federal legislation requires that SSS participants must be first generation college students (neither parent has a four-year degree), come from a low-income background, and/or have a documented disability.  Two-thirds of students must be both low-income and first generation.  SSS met these demographic requirements in 2018-19.

  • Gender –   Female: 67%    Male: 33%
  • Ethnicity –  Please see the chart below for a breakdown. 

Figure 6:  Breakdown of Ethnicities 2018-19

trio-sss ethnicity 2018-2019 with the highest hispanic and lowest American Indian

Statistics on Program Usage

Table 1: SSS Individual Advising/ Coaching 2018-19 – Number of Participants Served

Total number of active participants during fall and spring semesters*

149

Received individualized non-cognitive skills coaching

149

Received advice and assistance in postsecondary course selection

13

Received education/counseling to improve financial aid literacy

95

Received information in applying for Federal Student Aid

10

Received assistance in completing and applying for Federal Student Aid

34

Received assistance in applying for admission to Graduate School

15

Received study abroad or National Student Exchange advising

8

Received Career and professional development advising/coaching

71

Total number of individual advising/coaching sessions 2018-19

1109

*Does not include students admitted during the summer of 2019

Table 2: SSS Group Advising/Coaching in 2018-19 – Number of Participants Served

STEP (new transfer students)—eight week seminar including these topics: course selections, financial literacy, non-cognitive skill development

7

FOCUS (new first year participants) – yearlong seminar including these topics: financial literacy, non-cognitive skill development, and course selection

23

Field School (RECR 399)

26

TRIO SSS leadership trainings and development activities

23

Graduate school preparation activities

19

Professional development and career-oriented activities

5

Life After College workshop

11

Total number of participants in group advising/coaching sessions in 2018-19

70

Note:The Field School category is not included in the total because these participants were already counted in other categories – FOCUS and leadership.

Student Assessment of Satisfaction, Quality, and Student Learning Outcomes

Student Learning Outcome #1: Increased participation in project services

As a result of participants creating their own contract each semester in combination with increased communication and monitoring of student progress by project staff (at least one contact per month), student participation in project services will increase over that of the previous year.  

  • 2018-19 Outcome: The total number of individual advising sessions increased from 664 in 2016-17 and 1036 in 2017-18 to 1109 in 2018-19.  See Tables 1 and 2 for a breakdown of individual and group sessions.

Student Learning Outcome #2: Increased academic self-confidence (first year students)

As a result of the yearlong First Year Enrichment Seminar, first year participants will express increased academic self-confidence in the following areas: (1) ability to identify various resources on campus that support students with disabilities and first generation students from low income and other underrepresented backgrounds; (2) willingness to utilize campus resources; (3) knowledge that research has proven that intelligence can increase over time; and (4) ability to identify various opportunities for connecting with the campus community during their academic career.

  • 2018-19 Outcome: Student evaluations indicate that 100% of all new first year, second year, and graduating seniors reported that the services offered by the project had positive impact on their academic self-confidence (see tables 3, 4, and 6).

Student Learning Outcome #3:  Increased financial literacy

As a result of four individualized coaching sessions and four group advising sessions over the course of an academic year with the financial literacy coach, first year students will be able to (1) find, read, and understand their financial aid award, (2) explain the value of reducing dependence upon student loans, (3) compare their financial aid award to their anticipated expenses in order to identify and plan for unmet need, (4) identify strategies and resources to bridge the gap between academic expenses and financial aid awarded, and (5) create a realistic annual budget that will stretch their financial aid dollars.  

  • 2018-19 Outcomes: Student evaluations indicate that (1) new first year participants participating in FOCUS, (2) 2nd year participants participating in the fall financial wellness workshop, and (3) graduating seniors who participated in the “Life After College” workshop increased their financial literacy greatly in all areas pre-identified as crucial (tables 3 – 5).  Quantitative data collected through financial aid records indicate that, while the cost of attendance continues to increase at CSU, Chico, first year and second year students continue to borrow less than what is offered to them.

Table 3: 2018-19 FOCUS Participant Evaluations – Highlights

FOCUS 2018-19 Programming - Intended Participant Outcomes

Perceived Level of Impact

Unlimited individualized coaching sessions

100%

Weekly study and goal setting sessions with mentors

88%

Workshops on academic success and time management

94%

Activities required by TRIO-SSS contract

100%

Overcoming challenges in college

100%

Increased academic self-confidence

100%

Ability to identify, locate, and use campus resources

100%

Improved study skills

94%

Improved time management

100%

Improved budgeting skills

94%

Better understanding of financial aid package

94%

Increased desire to decrease, avoid, or eliminate debt

94%

Able to make a budget-driven decision on how much to work

82%

Overall satisfaction with FOCUS

100%

Table 4: 2018-19 Second Year Participant Evaluations – Highlights

2nd Year  2018-19 Programming - Intended Participant Outcomes

Perceived Level of Impact

(of those who participated)

Increased academic self-confidence

100%

Identifying and applying to scholarships

93%

Course Selection

95%

Seeking out and utilizing campus resources

89%

Finding affordable housing

89%

Improved study skills

100%

Improved time management

100%

Improved budgeting skills

100%

Overcoming personal issues

94%

Decreasing, avoiding or eliminating debt

89%

Able to make a budget-driven decision on how much to work

63%

Getting involved with the campus community

94%

Completing and/or submitting financial aid documents

95%

Stretching financial aid to cover the entire year

84%

Creating or adding to an emergency savings account

95%

Engaging in healthy activities

95%

Learning more about yourself as a person

100%

Performing well academically

100%

Making connections with professors

95%

Building relationships with staff in the Career Center

74%

Learning new skills

100%

Expanding your interests

100%

Overcoming challenges

100%

Table 5: 2019 Life After College Seminar Participant Evaluations – Highlights

2019 Life After College Seminar - Intended Participant Outcomes

Perceived Level of Impact

Giving back and moving forward – family, friends, and values

100%

Branding yourself as a professional

100%

Techniques for professional job search

100%

Mock interviews

100%

Budgeting for life after college

100%

Financial planning and wealth building

100%

Table 6: 2019 Graduating Senior Survey

2019 Graduating Seniors - Intended Participant Outcomes

Perceived Level of Impact

Performing well academically

100%

Increased academic self-confidence

100%

Course Selection

93%

Connection with campus resources

100%

Selection of major or minor

67%

Study skills

100%

Time management

100%

Money management

100%

Overcoming personal issues and challenges

100%

Decreasing, avoiding or eliminating debt

100%

Preparing for and/or applying to graduate school

67%

Career preparation, exploration, and readiness

100%

Stepping outside of comfort zone

100%

Engaging in healthy activities

100%

Expanding you interests

100%

VII. Analysis

  • Continue to increase recruitment efforts toward underrepresented groups – The number of SSS applications received from males and black students (both genders) continues to be low compared with other populations. We have seen a four percent increase in the overall number of male students served since setting this goal, from 29% in 2016-17 to 33% in 2018-19, and male representation on our student staff has increased by 33% in that time. New and innovative approaches need to continue to be sought that will encourage these students to apply.
  • Continue to seek and obtain supplemental funds – The U.S Department of Education imposes strict guidelines governing the use of project funds to pay for food and hospitality. This presents a challenge when scheduling overnight field trips, as well as daylong workshops and trainings for project participants from low-income backgrounds who cannot afford to supply their own meals/accommodations.  In 2017-18, the project director requested and secured the project’s ability to pay for room and board for both FOCUS and the Graduate School Tour through the end of the grant cycle in 2020.  The project was also awarded a $2500 grant through the Student Learning Fee, which subsidized the project’s financial wellness program in 2018-19. The project should continue to seek additional funds for purchase of items not allowable by the U.S. Department of Education.
  • Continue to offer comprehensive and intrusive financial wellness programming – Analysis of data collected from 2015-2019, including both qualitative (participant surveys) and quantitative (financial aid records), indicates that the project’s financial wellness programming is making a positive impact participants’ ability to (1) “right size” their student loan package and (2) create a realistic budget to make their financial aid dollars stretch throughout the academic year. Accordingly, financial wellness programming for students at all stages of their academic career will continue, and the project director will continue to track the student loan debt of sophomores receiving grant aid, juniors and seniors on “Career Track” contracts, and graduating seniors (Life After College). This will allow for more comprehensive analysis and assessment of these services project-wide.
  • Continue to offer First Year Experience seminar to first year participants – Analysis of data collected from participant surveys and evaluations indicates that the project’s non-cognitive skill building activities offered via the First Year Experience seminar successfully increased participants’ academic self-confidence (see table 3).
  • Continue to require weekly study sessions for first year participants each fall – New first year participants were required to attend 1.5 hour study sessions once per week in the fall semester and then were offered optional sessions in the spring. At the end of spring 2019, 88% of participants indicated that the study sessions had a positive impact on their academic performance, and 100% recommended continuing to require study sessions in the future.
  • Continue to require enrollment in U-courses and/or Camp Wildcat for first year participants each fall – After the success of the REACH pilot in 2015-16, it was decided to require that all of our first year participants enroll in U-courses in the fall semester moving forward. In the fall of 2018, we expanded the course selection to include Camp Wildcat courses, which follow a similar high impact model. Students who participated in one of these high impact courses averaged a 3.48 in the fall of 2018, compared with a 2.71 who did not participate. Even more impressive, students who participated finished out the year with an average 3.0 cumulative GPA at the end of spring 2019, as compared with a 2.68 for students who did not participate in these courses. Based upon these evaluations, the project will continue to required enrollment in U-courses and/or high impact Camp Wildcat courses, and will strongly encourage and incentivize all first year participants to enroll in a second semester of U-courses in the spring.
  • Continue to offer TRIO Distinguished Scholar program – The number of coaching sessions with upperclassmen have increased ever since this program was implemented in fall 2015, as have cumulative GPAs (see Figure 1). This year we conducted our most comprehensive graduating senior evaluation to date on Survey Monkey.  100% of respondents indicated that the project had an impact on their career readiness and 67% indicated that the project helped them research and/or apply to graduate school.  These statistics are reflective of the activities required by Career Track and Grad School Track contracts.  Further data analysis needs to be conducted to determine the significance of the correlation between participation in project services and the TRIO Distinguished Scholar program. The project will continue to evaluate this program’s success through qualitative (graduating senior exit evaluations and alumni surveys) and quantitative (review of academic transcripts and financial aid records) to further explore the Career Track and Grad School Track contracts’ impact on academic success, financial wellness, applications to graduate school, and career-readiness upon graduation.
  • Continue to offer spring leadership course with a focus on social justice, undergraduate research, and community service – 17 first year students opted to take the optional spring leadership course offered by TRIO-SSS this year. This course was co-taught by library faculty and students conducted high quality undergraduate research focused on social justice issues in the U.S. and in their home communities. After reviewing participants’ transcripts, cumulative GPAs at the end of the spring semester for students who took the course were 3.18, as compared with 2.22 for those who did not participate. While more data should be collected in the coming years, continued connection to program staff and high quality academic preparation in the second semesters appears to have a correlation with academic performance.
  • Continue to tie grant aid to completion of TRIO-SSS contracts – Quantitative (cumulative GPA) and qualitative (student evaluations) data for first year and 2nd year participants indicate that the activities required by the 1st and 2nd year contracts have a positive impact on student success in all areas pre-identified as important (refer to tables 3 and 4).

VII. Program Objectives for the next academic year

Program Annual Objectives for 2019–20

  1. Hire and onboard new project director.
  2. Submit new grant proposal for 2020-2025
  3. Spend down all grant funds to zero by the end of project year 2020.

Trio/Upward Bound Projects

Note:  Upward Bound is a TRIO program funded by the United States Department of Education to provide academic support services to low-income, first generation college bound high school students. The mission statement and program goals (objectives in the U.S. Department of Education framework) are specified by federal regulations and policies and cannot be altered without approval from a program officer at the U.S. Department of Education.

I. Mission Statement

The mission of Upward Bound is to increase the rate at which participants complete secondary education and enroll in and graduate from institutions of postsecondary education.

Department Goals (Performance Objectives dictated by the U.S. Department of Education)

  1. Academic Performance Grade Point Average (GPA): 60% of participants served during the project year will have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better on a four-point scale at the end of the school year.
  2. Academic Performance Test: 40% of UB seniors served during the project year, will have achieved at the proficient level on state assessments in reading/language arts and math.
  3. Secondary School Retention and Graduation: 90% of project participants served during the project year will continue in school for the next academic year, at the next grade level, or will have graduated from secondary school with a regular secondary school diploma.
  4. Secondary School Graduation: 50% of all current and prior year UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project had an expected high school graduation date in the school year, will complete a rigorous secondary school program of study and graduate that year with a regular secondary school diploma.
  5. Postsecondary Enrollment: 70% of all current and prior UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project had an expected high school graduation date in the school year, will enroll in a program of postsecondary education by the fall term immediately after high school graduation or will have received notification, by the fall term immediately following high school, from an institution of higher education, of acceptance but deferred enrollment until the next academic semester (e.g. spring semester).
  6. Postsecondary Completion: 37% of participants who enrolled in a program of postsecondary education, by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or by the next academic term (e.g. spring term) as a result of acceptance but deferred enrollment, will attain either an associate’s or bachelor’s degree within six years following graduation from high school. 

The date of last review was December 2018.

II. Departmental Accomplishments

  • Awarded Upward Bound Math and Science supplemental funding from the U. S. Department of Education.
  • Established a Go Fund me account for Upward Bound participants affected by the Camp Fire.
  • Implemented STEM work study internships for 10 participants.
  • Upward Bound Class of 2019 – On June 18, 2019, we celebrated our graduating class of 2019.  Graduates received last minute guidance and resources from their Upward Bound advisor on how to navigate their first year at their respective college and finalized financial aid award letters, course selection, housing payments and summer orientation registration.  We are excited that 37 of the 101 graduates (37%) will enroll at CSU, Chico in the fall. The following list indicates which colleges our graduates will attend in the fall of 2019.
The colleges our graduates will attend in the Fall of 2019

Institution

Number of Students

Air Force Community College

1

American River College

2

Butte College

15

Cal Poly Pomona

1

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

1

California State University, Chico

37

California State University, Northridge

1

Fresno City College

1

Humboldt State University

1

Lane Community College

1

Macomb College

1

Oregon State University

1

Sacramento City College

1

Sacramento State University

6

San Diego State University

1

San Jose State University

1

Santa Monica College

1

Shasta College

1

Sonoma State University

1

UC Berkeley

2

UC Davis

7

UC Irvine

2

UC Merced

2

UC Santa Barbara

2

United States Navy

1

University of Nevada, Reno

1

Yuba College

9

  • Offered innovative SAT test preparation – In the spring of 2019, the program partnered with Educational Testing Centers, Inc. (ETC).  ETC offers innovative online instruction that allowed 30 students (high school juniors) to enroll in an online course taught by two trained instructors.  This course met for two hours every Sunday for six weeks.  ETC provided each student with a workbook and textbook and students were able to ask questions in real time.  They could even contact the instructors via virtual office hours if they needed further instruction or clarification on certain areas.  Based on an extensive evaluation, participants reported feeling more prepared for the SAT test.  Upward Bound plans to once again partner with ETC in the fall of 2019 and offer 30-40 students the opportunity to enroll in these sequential workshops. 

Highlights:

  • Awarded Upward Bound Math and Science supplemental funding from the U. S. Department of Education. – The U. S. Department of Education invited existing Upward Bound grantees to apply for supplemental $40,000 grants to expand STEM activities to all Upward Bound participants. CSUC applied for and was awarded four grants totaling $160,000.  The funds were used to increase math and science tutoring during the academic year for students struggling in those subject areas.  Participants were encouraged to sign up for two hours of tutoring each week, instead of one session.  The program also purchased a class set of VEX robotics kits to replace the outdated Lego robot kits currently being used during the Upward Bound summer program.  Additionally, the funds were utilized towards wages for a computer science instructor during the summer program as well as a STEM based college tour for participants with perfect tutoring attendance during the academic year.  
  • Established a Go Fund me account for Upward Bound participants affected by the Camp Fire. 26 current Upward Bound participants were directly impacted by the devastating Camp Fire on November 8, 2018. Of those 26 Paradise High School students, 23 lost their homes and all of their possessions.  Upward Bound staff was able to account for all 26 students within 3 days of the fire and confirm that they and their families had escaped and were safe.  The project established a Go Fund me account within one week of the fire and raised in excess of $13,000 from TRIO folks across the country.  Each participant received more than $500.  Additionally, the project was able to provide each student with a new backpack and school supplies to get them started again once they resumed classes in January.  Together with Upward Bound summer program teachers and staff, we hosted Paradise students to a pizza night and bowling in order for them to stay connected with us and each other.  Unfortunately, 4 participants moved out of the target area and we were no longer able to serve them.  Although our Paradise students are now dispersed throughout Northern California, they continue to receive services from our program and we are excited to resume our partnership with Paradise High School in the fall of 2019.
  • Implemented STEM work study internships for 10 participants. – The work experience opportunities available to participants from the Original and Upward Bound II programs were extended to 10 students from the Math and Science and STEM programs during the 2019 summer program. With approval and additional funding from the U. S. Department of Education, project staff set out to find STEM specific work sites for 10 students attending the summer program.  Participants were placed in sites according to their career interests.  Those interested in engineering, were placed within the City of Chico Public Works and interned directly under the supervision of the City’s senior civil engineer on current city funded projects.  Two participants with an interest in the medical field were placed at Chico Eye Center, where they worked closely with optometrists and center staff.  One lucky student with an interest in science was placed at Fish Bio, an international fisheries and environmental consulting company dedicated to advancing the research, monitoring and conservation of fishes around the world.  Our Upward Bound participants actively assists with research and data collection on a daily basis.  Four students worked at aviation industry related internships.  Sel-Tech and Air Spray Aviation specialize in manufacturing and fabrication of parts and systems for a variety of aircraft, especially air tanker and air attack aircraft to fight wildfires. 

III. Changes in Policies and Procedures

Due to the new minimum wage law established in California that indicated salaried employees must make double the hourly minimum rate, all permanent salaried Upward Bound staff, with the exception of the Director and Assistant Director, became hourly employees. This was a dramatic change for the program that required extensive planning and shifting of responsibilities. Participants and parents were notified that newly hourly staff were only available during regular business hours, which is a complete shift from previous practice. All events/activities throughout the year were rescheduled during business hours to avoid excessive overtime. The project applied for and was approved to operate under a special summer schedule for the 2019 summer program. All hourly employees worked four 10 hour days, which allowed them to work until 7 p.m. daily and avoid overtime.  All summer overtime hours were established prior to the summer program and discussed with hourly employees.  Any additional overtime hours, had to first be approved by the Project Director. 

IV. Resources Summary

Resource Allocation:

Original Upward Bound Grant 
June 1, 2018 – May 31, 2019
125 participants

  • 2018-2019 allocation: $656,347
  • Program expenses: $643,472
  • Projected carry forward: $12,875                                              

Upward Bound II Grant
September 1, 2018 – August 31, 2019
76 participants

  • 2018-2019 allocation: $413,528
  • Program expenses: $413,528
  • Projected carry forward: $0.00

Upward Bound Math & Science 
September 1, 2018 – August 31, 2019
56 participants

  • 2018-2019 allocation: $315,155
  • Program expenses: $304,785
  • Projected carry forward: $10,370 

Upward Bound STEM 
October 1, 2018 – September 30, 2019
60 participants

  • 2018-2019 allocation: $315,155
  • Program expenses: $315,155
  • Projected carry forward: $0

Summer Foods Service Program 
June 1, 2017 – May 31, 2018
220 participants

  • 2017-2018 allocation: $40,554.68
  • Program expenses:$40,554.68
  • Projected carry forward: $0.00

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA)
July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019
64 eligible participants from Colusa, Glenn, Sutter and Yuba counties

  • 2018-2019 allocation: $63,455
  • Program expenses: $63,455
  • Projected carry forward: $0.00

Amy Kee Scholarship Endowment

  • 2018-2019 total: $16,743.54
  • 2018-2019 contributions: $2,114.00 

Total funds for 2018-2019: $1,820,938.22

Human Resources: 

Maria Rivera-Xiong made the difficult decision to leave her position as Program Advisor for the Upward Bound STEM program in October of 2018.  She began her career with Upward Bound in 2008 as a Resident Advisor and eventually moved up to Lead Resident Advisor, Clerical Assistant and ultimately Program Advisor after graduating from CSU, Chico.  In her time with us, she developed lasting relationships with her students and established a close connection to counseling staff at her respective high schools.  

In November of 2018, Madison Bassow was hired as the Program Advisor for the Original Upward Bound Program to oversee Orland, Hamilton City, Lindhurst and Yuba City High Schools.  Madison is a Chico native, who went on to attend and graduate from California State University, Channel Islands in 2018.  Madison brings extensive experience to our program, having worked with a comprehensive student support program at CSUCI for four years.  In that time, she developed and facilitated workshops for first generation students from low income backgrounds and helped guide them through their undergraduate career.  Aside from the caseload of students she is responsible for managing, Madison will also oversee the work-based learning groups (task teams) for students during the summer program.  Here, participants learn first time job skills and soft skills that will better prepare them for employment opportunities in the future. 

Facilities/Equipment: 

  • The campus wide electrical shutdown in June of 2019 coincided with the start of our summer residential program.  Although the BMU had been reserved six months prior to the start of the program, staff had to quickly find an off-campus alternative.  We continue to be so grateful for the partnership we have built with Bidwell Presbyterian Church, as they quickly stepped in and accommodated our group of 230 students and staff on a Sunday afternoon with an air-conditioned facility.  
  • This summer we were once again able to utilize Shasta and Lassen residence halls for our summer program.  University Housing has also allowed us to use the University Hub as a study space for our students and because of its close proximity to the dormitories, students are able to easily move back and forth from their dorm to the U Hub. 

V. Program Assessment of Past Year

Program Objectives:

  1. Academic Performance Grade Point Average (GPA): 60% of participants served during the project year will have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better on a four-point scale at the end of the school year.
    Exceeded – 94% of the 317 participants served during the project year, had a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better.  
  2. Academic Performance Test: 40% of UB seniors served during the project year, will have achieved at the proficient level on state assessments in reading/language arts and math.
    Exceeded – 74% of the UB seniors served during the 2017-2018 project year achieved proficiency before graduating high school.  
  3. Secondary School Retention and Graduation: 90% of project participants served during the project year will continue in school for the next academic year, at the next grade level, or will have graduated from secondary school with a regular secondary school diploma. 
    Exceeded – 100% of participants served during the 2017-2018 academic year continued in school at the next grade level or graduated with a diploma. 
  4. Secondary School Graduation: 50% of all current and prior year UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project had an expected high school graduation date in the school year, will complete a rigorous secondary school program of study and graduate that year with a regular secondary school diploma.
    Exceeded – 88% of participants graduated high school having completed A-G coursework.
  5. Postsecondary Enrollment: 73% of all current and prior UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project had an expected high school graduation date in the school year, will enroll in a program of postsecondary education by the fall term immediately after high school graduation or will have received notification, by the fall term immediately following high school, from an institution of higher education, of acceptance but deferred enrollment until the next academic semester (e.g. spring semester).
    Exceeded – 93% of graduates in 2018 enrolled in college immediately following high school. 
  6. Postsecondary Completion: 37% of participants who enrolled in a program of postsecondary education, by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or by the next academic term (e.g. spring term) as a result of acceptance but deferred enrollment, will attain either an associate’s or bachelor’s degree within six years following graduation from high school.
    Exceeded - 50% of participants received their degree within six years, although the data shows that the majority of the remaining participants were still enrolled in their seventh year. 

Ongoing Assessment Efforts:

Demographic Reporting  

A total of 317 participants were served during the 2018-2019 academic year by the four Upward Bound programs. See breakdown by program below. 

Original Upward Bound – 125 participants
Upward Bound II – 76 participants
Upward Bound Math & Science – 56 participants                       
Upward Bound STEM – 60 participants

2018-2019 ethnicity data graph showing 49% of students being latinos and the lowest being 2% native American

Ethnicity Breakdown  

The ethnicity breakdown is similar to previous years and reflects the low-income/first generation population of the six-county service area in Northern California. 

VI. Analysis

More Strategic College Admissions Test Preparation – For the past five years, we’ve provided a SAT or ACT test preparation course and a proctored exam for all incoming high school juniors during the summer program.  Because our students attend their regular classes Monday through Thursday, the test preparation workshops are always offered on a Friday morning.  This has not been the most effective method and time to provide this information since students are tired from attending class all week.  We are excited to partner with ETC again this year and see if perhaps we discontinue the test preparation workshops during the summer and instead focus on providing a more structured online test preparation course during the academic year. 

Low Male Enrollment – For the past five years, we have seen a decline in the number of male applicants that seek out our services.  This concern has been a source of much deliberation and thought as we try and figure out how to increase the number of male students in our program.  This past year, we increased the number of presentations at each target school, but we have not yet been able to connect with coaches so that we can offer presentation to male athletes in particular.  We feel that this would be a great target population since our program offers free weekly tutoring to all participants, and would go hand in hand with students wanting to increase their grade to ensure participation in school sports.  We also plan to host a Counselor Conference in the fall of 2019, so that we can emphasize this need to counselors and principals. 

VII. Program Objectives for Next Academic Year

Increase college credit courses during the 2020 summer program – In 2018, we offered the first course for college credit during the six-week summer residential program.  We partnered with Butte Community College to offer a medical terminology course that participants with an interest in medicine could enroll in.  The instructor is incredibly dynamic and works so well with each student.  Because of this success, we would like to offer an introductory computer science course for students interested in that area and have those students also gain three college credits by the end of the summer program.  We will begin contacting prospective instructors in the fall of 2019 to hopefully have everything in place for June 2020.

Increase Male Enrollment – Project staff will make a concerted effort to make inroads with two coaches at each target school, with the goal of increasing male enrollment in our program.  Additionally, there has been more turnover with target school counseling staff, and our staff is making efforts to establish a relationship with those new individuals as well as inform them of our services, requirements and the need for male applicants.