GEOG 102.01     Peoples, Places, Environments

Syllabus


Men are so inclined to content themselves with what is commonest; the spirit and the senses so easily grow dead to the impressions of the beautiful and perfect, that every one should study, by all methods, to nourish in his mind the faculty of feeling these things. ...For this reason, one ought every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.

Goethe, Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship. Bk. v, ch. 1 (Carlyle, tr.) [source: Stevenson]


Spring 2018                                                                       Dr. Scott Brady

MWF: 10-10:50                                                         Office: 523 Butte Hall

Location: Butte 101                                                  Phone: 898-5588

Office Hours: MWF: 9:15-9:45, 11-12:45

                                   

sbrady@csuchico.edu

 


Accessibility Resource Center:

If you have a documented disability that may require reasonable accommodations, please contact me privately to discuss your specific needs and also contact Accessibility Resource Center (ARC) for coordination of your academic accommodations. ARC is located across from the Meriam Library in the Student Services Center building (Student Services Center 170; 898-5959; http://www.csuchico.edu/arc/).


Course Description:

In this course students will learn how the study of human geography, leads to an understanding of the interdependence of places and regions in a globalizing world. Among the topics we will consider during the course are regions, culture, resources, spatial behavior.


How the course fits the Diversity Pathway: This course presents fundamental geographic concepts in the context of the world's places and regions. Special emphasis is placed on factors that link and isolate peoples of the world. The course supports the pathway’s emphasis on understanding the world’s places and regions in a comparative framework, and its focus on interdependencies that emerge from a globalized economy, society, and culture. The course has the Global Cultures designation.


How the course fits the International Studies Pathway: This course presents fundamental geographic concepts in the context of the world's places and regions. Special emphasis is placed on factors that link and isolate peoples of the world. The course supports the pathway’s emphasis on understanding the world’s places and regions in a comparative framework, and its focus on interdependencies that emerge from a globalized economy, society, and culture. The course has the Global Cultures designation.


How the course fits the Sustainability Pathway: This course presents fundamental geographic concepts in the context of the world's places and regions. Special emphasis is placed on factors that link and isolate peoples of the world. The course supports the pathway’s emphasis on sustainability by engaging students in study of the relationship between human populations and the physical world on which they depend. The course has the Global Cultures designation.


 

Course Student Learning Objectives              Associated GE Student Learning Objectives

   Students can explain interactions between the size and distribution of human and non-human populations, resources and the natural environment in historic and contemporary perspectives.

   Global Engagement

 

   Student will understand ways in which they use the environment can affect future generations and other human and natural systems.

   Sustainability

   Students understand their family’s migration history in the context of historical patterns of immigration and migration that have shaped the contemporary social landscape in the United States, including comparative and historical studies of the cultures of origin of American ethnic groups.

   Diversity

 


How course will meet GE SLOs: This course will meet three GE SLOs, as noted in the table above. Global engagement will be met by the entire course, which is already a global cultures course. The course will study sustainability as a concept and challenge for humanity across the globe as it interacts with its diverse physical environments. The course focuses on the ability of students to see how the lives they live in one place are affected by and affect the lives of others elsewhere. Students will practice active inquiry in weekly question sets that focus critically on the readings of each week.


Geography and Planning Department Course Student Learner Objectives

1.1 Students can formulate geographic research questions.

2.1. Students can recognize the presence and application of regional, local and global dimensions of the social and physical worlds in the landscape.

2.2. Students can recognize the presence and application of regional, local and global dimensions of the social and physical worlds in data.

3.1. Students can explain interactions between the size and distribution of human and non-human populations, resources and the natural environment in historic and contemporary perspectives.

3.2. Students are cognizant of varying interpretations of causality, interaction, policy and values in human-environmental relationships.

3.3 Student will understand ways in which they use the environment can affect future generations and other human and natural systems.

4.1. Students can analyze information from different physical or social sciences from a geographic perspective.


Required Materials:

 

1. de Blij, Harm. 2008. The Power of Place: Geography, Destiny, and Globalization's Rough Landscape. Oxford University Press. You will need it by

 

2. Online readings. 

 

Also, students should download Google Earth onto their laptops or tablets.


Grading

 

Academic Policies and Regulations: http://catalog.csuchico.edu/viewer/18/ACAREGS.html

 

Final grades are based on % of 375-400 total points, earned from the categories below.

A=92-100%; B= 80-91%; C=68-79%; D=50-67%; and F= less than 50%.

 

Exam 1                                                    50 points

Exam 2                                                    50 points

Final Exam                                                       100 points

Quizzes ~30 X 10 or 5                             ~225 points

Question sets and maps ~15-20 X 5        ~75-100 points

Writing Assignment                                 25 points

Total                                              ~525-550 points


Course website: I regularly update the course website. Students must frequently visit the site to be aware of changes and additions. I do not use Bb.


Attendance: There is a strong correlation between attendance and performance. Students who rarely miss a class and actively participate in classroom discussions tend to perform well on tests, quizzes, and in class discussions; students who don’t tend to perform poorly. I strongly encourage you to attend every class meeting.


Make-up Exams: No make-up exams will be given. If a student misses exam 1 or 2 with an appropriate excuse, then the make-up will be the comprehensive final exam, which will then be counted as 150 points. Only one exam can be made up in this fashion. If a student misses a second exam that exam will be recorded as a 0.


Quizzes: Approximately 30 quizzes will be given throughout the semester. They will always occur on Mondays and Fridays. Map quizzes on Mondays; Content quizzes on Fridays. There will be no make-up quizzes.


Assignments: Students will complete one writing assignment during the semester, which is worth 25 points. Late assignments will not be accepted. If students will not be in class on an assignment due date, they must turn their assignments in prior to their absence. I will ask students to revise poorly written assignments and grade them only after adequate revision.


Question Sets: To ensure that students keep up with the assigned readings, students must complete question sets that guide them through assigned textbook readings. Students must submit handwritten answers to these questions. Question sets and due dates are posted on the course website. I will not accept question sets after the due date. Students will complete approximately 25 question sets. I will pick up 15-20 of the question sets for grading.


Readings and Participation: A fundamental element of a liberal education is the development of the ability to read critically. Hence, your success in this course largely depends on the amount of time and effort you devote to the assigned readings. To encourage your progress in this matter, during each of our meetings I will ask particular students to lead discussions on the required readings. Every student will get a chance. In addition, test questions will not only be drawn from lecture materials. Rather, a certain number of test questions will pertain to information found in the assigned readings.


Phones, tablets and laptops: I prefer that students not use laptops in class. Students should use laptops or tablets to work on most course material. Maps on phones are too small and undermine student learning.


Email: I do not text students. However, I regularly send students emails with changes in assignments or alerts about extra point opportunities. Students should check their campus email accounts every day.


Tentative Schedule:


Week 1: 1/22 – 1/26


Week 2: 1/29 – 2/2

 

Study Abroad


Week 3: 2/5 – 2/9


Week 4: 2/12 – 2/16


Week 5: 2/19 – 9/23


Week 6: 2/26 – 3/2


Week 7: 3/5 – 3/9


Week 8: 3/12 – 3/16


Week 9: 3/19 – 3/23

Spring Break


Week 10: 3/26 – 3/30

Friday, March 30, Cesar Chavez Day


Week 11: 4/2 – 4/6


Week 12: 4/9 – 4/13


Week 13: 4/16-4/20


Week 14: 4/23 – 4/27


Week 15: 4/30 – 5/4


Week 16: 5/7 – 5/11

         Preparation Week


Week 17: 5/12 – 5/18

         Final Exam Week