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General Education Upper Division Thematic: 9 Units

9 units required:

One GE goal is to provide you the opportunity to integrate and apply skills and knowledge gained through your college experience to issues and areas of life you will face as a citizen of a complex world. You should be able to relate your major to seemingly unrelated knowledge. To help achieve these goals, 9 of the required 48 GE units must be selected from upper-division courses within one of the themes described below. These courses may not be taken earlier than your last semester as a sophomore.

Each of the themes represents a topic of far-reaching concern. In addition to allowing you to immerse yourself in depth in the topic, you have the opportunity to draw from your previous General Education experiences and skills in exploring the dimensions of the theme. The content of the three courses you take will be drawn somewhat equally from the natural sciences, the humanities and fine arts, and the social sciences. But in contrast to the Breadth Areas of General Education, theme courses tend to be more integrative among those three areas.

If you first enrolled in college prior to fall 1993, you may be eligible to follow an earlier version of the 9-unit upper-division requirement. Note the following guidelines:

First-time freshmen who were admitted and matriculated beginning with the fall 1993 semester or thereafter, either at CSU, Chico or at another institution in the CSU or California Community College systems, must select one of the themes described in this section.
Prior college enrollment: If you 1) established catalog rights in the California State University or the California Community Colleges prior to fall 1993; 2) earned transferable college credit during that time; and 3) have since remained “continuously enrolled” in an accredited institution of higher learning, you may elect to complete a theme either from those described below or from themes which are described in a previous Class Schedule or an earlier University Catalog. The information is also available on the CSU, Chico Web.

Direct questions with regard to your eligibility for earlier versions of the themes to the Evaluations Office.

You must take all 9 units from within the same theme. Exceptions to this rule are described in the “Majors with Important Modifications to General Education Requirements” section which follows the theme descriptions. In some of the themes, you must follow the specified sequence, either beginning with a Foundation course, or concluding with a Capstone course.

THEME A: AMERICAN IDENTITIES AND CULTURES

Theme Coordinator: Tom McCready, HOLT 353.

The landscape of American cultures and ideas, and its scientific and technological base, provide a uniquely pluralistic background for individual Americans. This theme investigates important aspects of the rich cultural complexity which contributes to the American cultural landscape. Courses also follow the search for common community, the effects of this search upon an individual’s cultural roots, and the possibility of a pluralistic society which embraces cultural diversity. The metaphor of the salad bowl replaces that of the melting pot to reveal the many Americas.

1 course selected from:

GEOS    150    American Science and Technology    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: Completion of the General Education Breadth Areas B1, The Physical Universe, and B2, Life Forms.

GEOS    151    Science and the American Idea    3.0    SP *

Prerequisites: Completion of the Geneal Education Breadth Areas B1, The Physical Universe; and B2, Life Forms.

1 course selected from:

AMST    145    American Lives    3.0    FA *

MCGS    185    Religion/Amer Ethnic Minorities    3.0    FS *Eth

This course is the same as R S 185 which may be substituted.

PHIL    128    American Philosophical Thought    3.0    FS *

R S    185    Religion/Amer Ethnic Minorities    3.0    FS *Eth

This course is the same as MCGS 185 which may be substituted.

1 course selected from:

GEOG    152    The United States    3.0    FA *

HIST    134    American Ethnic Origins    3.0    FS *Eth

This course is the same as MCGS 134 which may be substituted.

JOUR    110    Entertain/Media/Amer Culture    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: ENGL 001.

MCGS    134    American Ethnic Origins    3.0    FS *Eth

This course is the same as HIST 134 which may be substituted.

THEME B: CONTEMPORARY HEALTH ISSUES

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Armeda Ferrini, BUTE 607.

With health becoming a national obsession, it is critical that you, as a consumer, be fully informed about the most recent medical findings and health trends. A broad perspective on health beliefs and practices helps us to better understand their impact on our culture. Courses within this theme provide insight into major contemporary health issues, from individual as well as societal viewpoints. The impact of politics, economics, culture, and ethics upon health will be addressed.

Foundation Course:
1 course required:

PHIL    140    Biomedical Ethics    3.0    FS *

1 course selected from:

BIOL    195    Biology of Cancer    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: BIOL 001 or BIOL 008.

NFSC    123    Nutrition/Physical Fitness    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: One lower-division course in biological sciences.

1 course selected from:

HCSV    167    Consumer Health    3.0    FS *

HCSV    170    Drugs in Our Society    3.0    FS *

SOCI    183    Sociology of Human Stress    3.0    FS *

THEME C: CROSS-CULTURAL EXPLORATION

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Susan Place, THMA 213.

One of the most intriguing aspects of the human experience is how people from different cultures experience reality in often very different ways. Why is this? And how has it come about? You are invited to join in this intellectual adventure to explore across cultures for a greater understanding of the many perspectives and values which provide the richness of the human experience. Guided by the traditions of literature, science, and interdisciplinary area studies, the goal of your exploration is an increased awareness of the forces of social change which are at work shaping the 21st century. Students are encouraged to enroll in all three theme courses simultaneously.

1 course selected from:

INST    105    Food Forever    3.0    FS *NW

This course is the same as PSSC 100 which may be substituted. This class will be disconinued fall 2005.

PSSC    100    Food Forever    3.0    FS *NW

This course is the same as INST 105 which may be substituted.

1 course selected from:

CHST    140    Chicano Literature    3.0    FA *Eth

This course is the same as SPAN 140 which may be substituted.

ENGL    153    Multicultural Literature    3.0    FS *Eth

SPAN    140    Chicano Literature    3.0    FA *Eth

This course is the same as CHST 140 which may be substituted.

1 course selected from:

AAST    150    Asian Studies: Contemporary Prob    3.0    FS *NW

This course is the same as ASST 150 which may be substituted.

AFRI    150    Contemporary Problems/Prospects    3.0    FS *NW

ANTH    1168    Indigenous Peoples of Latin America     3.0    SP *NW

ASST    150    Asian Studies: Contemp Problems    3.0    FS *NW

This course is the same as AAST 150 which may be substituted.

HIST    164    Middle East: Society/Culture    3.0    SP *NW

This course is the same as MEST 155 which may be substituted.

INST    115    Cultural Dimensions of International Business     3.0    FS

MEST    155    Middle East: Society/Culture    3.0    SP *NW

This course is the same as HIST 164 which may be substituted.

SOCI    154    Interethnic Contacts    3.0    FS *NW

THEME D: ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

Theme Coordinator: Tom Imhoff, TRNT 110.

Humans, like all creatures, are affected by their environment. Yet humans are unique in their ability to modify their surroundings. This theme explores the many ways in which humans use and abuse the environment. The theme objectives are 1) to impart an understanding of and an appreciation for the place of the human species in the global ecosystem; 2) to examine the ways that the environment has influenced human behavior; 3) to provide skills and information necessary to assess human impact and 4) to pursue ways to maintain Earth’s life-support systems.

1 course selected from:

BIOL    134    Conservation Ecology    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: BIOL 001 or equivalent.

GEOS    130    Environmental Science    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: One course from Breadth Area B1 and one course from Breadth Area B2 of the General Education requirements.

GEOS    140    Environmental Geology    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: One course from Breadth Area B1 and one course from Breadth Area B2 of General Education requirements.

1 course selected from:

PHIL    146    Environmental Ethics    3.0    FS *

R S    149    Cross-Cultural Environ Ethics    3.0    FS *

1 course selected from:

GEOG    104    Environmental Issues    3.0    FS *

HIST    150    American Environment    3.0    SP *Eth

RECR    110    Natural Resource/Inform Citizen    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

THEME E: ETHICS AND SOCIAL POLICY

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Robert Stewart, TRNT 105.

In this theme you will study the relationship between moral values you, as a member of society, hold, and their embodiment in the social institutions which affect your daily life. The foundation course for this theme, Ethics and Human Happiness (PHIL 108), presents a broad survey of theories of human good and moral obligation. In this theme, you will explore ethics as a philosophical theory, a social and cultural phenomenon, and as a matter of practical decision-making. The study of ethics cuts across disciplines and will allow you to select a capstone course close to your own interests.

Foundation Course:

1 course required:

PHIL    108    Ethics and Human Happiness    3.0    FS *

1 course selected from:

C E    178    Ethics, Technology, and Society    3.0    FS *

GEOS    154    Science and Ethics    3.0    SP *

Prerequisites: Completion of the General Education Breadth Area B requirement; PHIL 108.

1 course selected from:

Prerequisites: Completion of the General Education Breadth Area B requirement; PHIL 108.

Prerequisites: PHIL 108 and General Education Areas B1 and D3.

ECON    152    Medical Economics    3.0    SP *

Prerequisites: ECON 001, ECON 002, or ECON 003.

This course is the same as HCSV 133 which may be substituted.

HCSV    133    Medical Economics    3.0    SP *

Prerequisites: ECON 001, ECON 002, or ECON 003.

This course is the same as ECON 152 which may be substituted.

R S    148    Ethical Issues in Religion    3.0    FS *

PHIL    137    Phil Perspectives on Sex & Love    3.0    FS *

PHIL    138    Social Ethics    3.0    FA *

THEME F: GENDER PERSPECTIVES

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Kristina Schriver, THMA 379.

The Gender Perspectives Theme considers gender as a biological, historical, cultural, economic, and psychological force. It challenges assumptions about gender, and it explores ways of treating human relations and understanding beyond the stereotypes of divisions based on gender. Gender shapes the experience of self and the world so deeply and thoroughly that it almost goes unnoticed even by the most sensitive and intelligent people.

1 course selected from:

MCGS    126    Perspectives on Gender/Disease    3.0    SP *

This course is the same as NURS 126 which may be substituted.

NURS    126    Perspectives on Gender/Disease    3.0    SP *

This course is the same as MCGS 126 which may be substituted.

1 course selected from:

MCGS    170    Theoretical Perspectives Gender    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as PHIL 170 which may be substituted.

MCGS    150    Gender and the Stage    3.0    FA *

This course is the same as THEA 150 which may be substituted.

PHIL    170    Theoretical Perspectives Gender    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as MCGS 170 which may be substituted.

THEA    150    Gender and the Stage    3.0    FA *

This course is the same as MCGS 150 which may be substituted.

WMST    110    GLBTQ Issues and Identities    3.0    Inquire *Eth

1 course selected from:

CMST    120    Gender and Communication    3.0    FS *

HIST    136    Women/Gender in Amer History    3.0    Inq *

This course is the same as WMST 136 which may be substituted.

JOUR    111    Women/Men/Media    3.0    SP *

This course is the same as WMST 111 which may be substituted.

WMST    111    Women/Men/Media    3.0    SP *

This course is the same as JOUR 111 which may be substituted.

WMST    136    Women/Gender in Amer History    3.0    Inq *

This course is the same as HIST 136 which may be substituted.

THEME G: GLOBAL ISSUES

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Lal Singh, PLMS 225.

This theme focuses on the enduring global issues of environmental impact, human rights and justice, and violence and social conflict. Exploration of these issues can be done through one of two tracks. Track A, Geopolitics, investigates the nature of the world and its physical, cultural, economic, and political evolution and studies how the process of global interdependence, in its clash with local authorities and conditions, forces re-evaluation of the enduring theme issues. Track B, Global Food Issues, focuses on the area of worldwide food production and hunger as a method of inquiring into the theme issues.

Foundation - to be taken first:

1 course required:

R S 182E World Religions & Global Issues

1 course selected from:

GEOS 170 Energy in the Human Environment

PSSC 192NW World Food and Fiber Systems

Capstone - to be taken last:

1 course selected from:

ABUS 192NW/INST 192NW World Food and Hunger Issues

GEOG 103NW Geography and World Affairs

POLS 141 International Relations

 

THEME H: HONORS

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Andrea Lerner, OCNL 235.

We are faced with increasingly complex technology in all aspects of our lives, from medicine and agriculture to communication and international affairs. This technology has advanced more rapidly than our understanding of its social and ethical implications. The Honors theme uses team-taught courses and an independent study opportunity to explore this contemporary dilemma and to enable you to make informed decisions about these complex issues.

You must have been accepted into the Honors Program to enroll in any courses for this theme.

Track 1:

1 course required:

PSY 136H/R S 136H        What Motivates Altruism: Honors    3.0    FA *

1 course selected from:

Any one course from Track 2 except HNRS 199H

Track 2:

1 course selected from:

BIOL    116H    Science/Human Values: Honors    3.0    FA *

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program, faculty permission.

This course is the same as PHIL 116H which may be substituted.

CSCI    116H    Mind in the Machine-Honors    3.0    SP *

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program, faculty permission.

This course is the same as PSY 116H which may be substituted.

PHIL    116H    Science/Human Values: Honors    3.0    FA *

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program, faculty permission.

This course is the same as BIOL 116H which may be substituted.

PSY    116H    Mind in the Machine-Honors    3.0    SP *

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program, faculty permission.

This course is the same as CSCI 116H which may be substituted.

1 course selected from:

CMST    156H    Genocide/Mass Persuasion-Honors    3.0    FA *NW

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program.

This course is the same as MJIS 156H and SOCI 156H which may be substituted.

GEOG    116H    Crossing Boundaries    3.0    SP *Eth

Prerequisites: Junior status at the end of semester in which course is taken and current enrollment in the Honors Program.

This course is the same as MCGS 116H which may be substituted.

MCGS    116H    Crossing Boundaries    3.0    SP *Eth

Prerequisites: Junior status at the end of semester in which course is taken and current enrollment in the Honors Program.

This course is the same as GEOG 116H which may be substituted.

MJIS    156H    Genocide/Mass Persuasion-Honors    3.0    FA *NW

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program.

This course is the same as CMST 156H and SOCI 156H which may be substituted.

SOCI    156H    Genocide/Mass Persuasion-Honors    3.0    FA *NW

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program.

This course is the same as CMST 156H and MJIS 156H which may be substituted.

Capstone-to be taken last:

1 course selected from:

HNRS    199H    Honors GE Thesis    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Honors Program;

SOCI    107H    The Global Within the Community    3.0    SP *

Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors Program or faculty permission.

THEME I: MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Susan Place, THMA 213.

This theme is designed to provide you with a well-integrated set of courses which will enrich your understanding of our unique and complex southern neighbors in Mexico and Central America. We will examine social and political institutions, as well as development of the area’s natural resources to learn to understand the future and how the United States, particularly California, can interrelate. The history, politics, diverse social structure, and rich artistic traditions of Mexico and Central America are all expressions of a region that the United States, and particularly California, needs to understand and appreciate.

Students who select this theme have the option of spending the last six weeks of the semester on an “experiential-living” program in Mexico or Costa Rica. Please see the Latin American Studies Coordinator for more information.

1 course required:

LAST    103    Nat History/Ecology Middle Amer    3.0    FS *NW

Prerequisites: Completion of the lower-division GE Breadth Area B requirement or faculty permission.

This course is the same as LAST 103M which may be substituted.

1 course selected from:

LAST    100A    Mexico: Art/Literature/Music    3.0    FS *NW

This course is the same as LAST 100M which may be substituted.

1 course selected from:

GEOG    154A    Mexico: Land and People    3.0    FA *NW

This course is the same as LAST 102 which may be substituted.

HIST    182    Mexico: History and Politics    3.0    FS *NW

This course is the same as LAST 101 and LAST 101M which may be substituted.

LAST    101    Mexico: History and Politics    3.0    FS *NW

This course is the same as HIST 182 and LAST 101M which may be substituted.

LAST    102    Mexico: Land and People    3.0    FA *NW

This course is the same as GEOG 154A which may be substituted.

GEOG    154B    Central Amer/Carib: Land/People    3.0    Inq *NW

This course is the same as LAST 122 which may be substituted.

LAST    121    Central Amer: History/Politics    3.0    SP *NW

This course is the same as LAST 121C and POLS 121 which may be substituted.

LAST    122    Central Amer/Carib: Land/People    3.0    Inq *NW

This course is the same as GEOG 154B which may be substituted.

POLS    121    Central Amer: History/Politics    3.0    SP *NW

This course is the same as LAST 121 which may be substituted.

THEME J: MINDS, BRAINS, AND MACHINES

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Edward Vela, MODC 110.

One of the most extraordinary advances of twentieth century science and technology has been the emergence of artificial intelligence in machines. The very possibility of artificial intelligence inspires profound questions: Can machines think? Can brains be thought of as a kind of machine? Is language necessary for intelligence? Is having a conscious mind necessary for intelligence? How are mind and brain related? In this theme you will learn about the contributions to the interdisciplinary research and debates concerning the nature of intelligence and mind made by scientists and scholars in a variety of fields.

Foundation course:
1 course required:

PSY    175    Brain/Mind/Behavior    3.0    FA *

1 course selected from:

CSCI    122    Machines/Brains/Minds    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: Junior standing, faculty permission.

This course is the same as PHIL 132 which may be substituted.

PHIL    132    Machines/Brains/Minds    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: Junior standing, faculty permission.

This course is the same as CSCI 122 which may be substituted.

Capstone Course:

1 course selected from:

CSCI    123    Lang/Intelligence/Computation    3.0    FA *

PHIL    129    History of Mind    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as PSY 129 which may be substituted.

PSY    129    History of Mind    3.0    FA *

This course is the same as PHIL 129 which may be substituted.

THEME M: SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Michael Abruzzo, HOLT 201.

This theme exposes students to concepts and ideas which are a result of scientific applications and investigations. These applications have significant philosophical and moral impacts that affect our professional and private lives. Through lecture, discussion, and frequent writing assignments, students are encouraged to articulate and critically evaluate the ways various disciplines present and grapple with these pressing contemporary concerns.

2 courses selected from:

BIOL    103    Human Genetics    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.

BIOL    116    Science and Human Values    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: BIOL 001 or BIOL 008.

This course is the same as PHIL 116 which may be substituted.

OR     (the following course may be substituted for the above)

PHIL    116    Science and Human Values    3.0    SP *

Prerequisites: BIOL 001 or BIOL 008.

This course is the same as BIOL 116 which may be substituted.

PHIL    110    Philosophy of Science    3.0    FS *

Capstone course:
1 course selected from:

CSCI    110    Computer’s Impact on Society    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

MCGS    180    Gender, Science, and Society    3.0    FS *

THEME N: WAR AND PEACE

Theme Coordinator: Thomas Imhoff, TRNT 110.

This theme examines an issue of universal concern in an age of apocalyptic weapons — the causes of war and prospects for peace. Integrating an array of courses in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities, this theme invites students to draw their own conclusions about the causes and ethics of war and the real possibilities for peace.

1 course selected from:

INST    152    Quant Meth Conflict Resolution    3.0    FS * This class will be disconinued fall 2005.

Prerequisites: Completion of the General Education requirement for Breadth Area A4, Mathematical Concepts.

This course is the same as MATH 152 which may be substituted.

MATH    152    Quant Meth Conflict Resolution    3.0    SP *

Prerequisites: Completion of the General Education Breadth Area A4 requirement, Mathematical Concepts.

This course is the same as INST 152 which may be substituted.

PHYS    176    Nuclear Science    3.0    FS *

1 course selected from:

PHIL    139    Roots of War: Phil Survey    3.0    FS *

PHIL    145    Comparative Peace Studies    3.0    FS *

1 course selected from:

CMST    156    Genocide and Mass Persuasion    3.0    FS *NW

This course is the same as MJIS 156 and SOCI 156 which may be substituted.

HIST    144    America’s Vietnam Experience    3.0    FA *

MJIS    156    Genocide and Mass Persuasion    3.0    FS *NW

This course is the same as CMST 156 and SOCI 156 which may be substituted.

POLS    144    U.S. Foreign Policy Nuclear Age    3.0    FS *

SOCI    156    Genocide and Mass Persuasion    3.0    FA *NW

This course is the same as CMST 156 and MJIS 156 which may be substituted.

THEME O: WOMEN’S ISSUES

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Carol Burr, BUTE 611.

This theme is designed to provide a variety of perspectives on women within the United States and globally, including psychological, social and cultural issues, artistic and religious expression, political and scientific involvement, and health concerns. These perspectives are explored and analyzed to help students, both male and female, appreciate the contributions of women and to understand the issues that affect women’s lives.

1 course selected from:

HCSV    168    Women’s Health    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as NURS 168 and WMST 168 which may be substituted.

NURS    168    Women’s Health    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as HCSV 168 and WMST 168 which may be substituted.

WMST    168    Women’s Health    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as HCSV 168 and NURS 168 which may be substituted.

1 course selected from:

ENGL    160    Women Writers    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as WMST 160 which may be substituted.

R S    140    Women and Religion    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as WMST 140 which may be substituted.

WMST    140    Women and Religion    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as R S 140 which may be substituted.

WMST    160    Women Writers    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as ENGL 160 which may be substituted.

1 course selected from:

POLS    124    Women and Politics    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as WMST 124 which may be substituted.

PSY    115    Psychology of Women    3.0    FS *

SOCI    131    Work and Family Issues    3.0    FS *

WMST    124    Women and Politics    3.0    FS *

This course is the same as POLS 124 which may be substituted.

WMST    133    Women Internationally    3.0    FS *NW

THEME Q: INTERNATIONAL STUDIES ABROAD

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004.
Theme P is now incorporated into Theme Q.


Theme Coordinator: Patricia Black, TRNT 133.

Students who participate in the London Semester or in the CSU International Program in France (Aix-en-Provence or Paris), Spain (Madrid or Granada), or Italy (Florence) are eligible to complete two out of the three required coruse for this upper-division theme during their study abroad. The third upper-division theme course must be taken at Chico and must be selected from approved courses in science. Early and frequent consultation with the theme coordinator is indispensable.

THEME R: GLOBAL MUSIC, CULTURE, AND TECHNOLOGY

Theme Coordinator: Paul Friedlander, PAC 101.

Music has always been an integral part of civilization. For many people, it is a significant part of their spiritual being and a valued companion in their lifelong search for meaning. This theme examines the nature of seven styles of contemporary global music and how they can be understood through the study of surrounding culture and influenced by the historical development of musical technology and its basis in concurrent science.

Students will explore: 1) rural blues of 20th century America, 2) son and salsa from Cuba, 3) the Beatles from England, 4) reggae from Jamaica, 5) Afro-pop from Senegal/Mali, 6) Aboriginal rock from Australia, and 7) rap from the United States. For each musical style, students will listen to and study the nature of the music in the capstone course, Case Studies in Global Music (MUS 182), in an emphatically non-technical manner. Previously, students will have examined how culture works and generates musical meaning in American Popular Culture (AMST 135) and will have explored the science of music and the history of music technology in Sound in the Environment (PHYS 110).

Students will listen to a lot of music. In addition, classroom instruction will include lecture, discussion, video and film, live performance, experiments, computer demonstrations, concert attendance, and group projects.

2 courses required:

AMST    135    American Popular Culture    3.0    FS *

PHYS    110    Sound in the Environment    3.0    FS *

Capstone Course:

1 course required:

MUS    182    Case Studies in Global Music    3.0    FS *

THEME S: WEALTH, POWER, AND INEQUALITY

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Troy Jollimore, TRNT 112.

Inequalities in wealth and status are universal social phenomena and give rise in all societies to important issues regarding the distribution of income, wealth, and opportunities for mobility. The discussion requires empirically identifying the extent of inequality as well as identifying the causal structural mechanisms in society that give rise to inequality. Finally, there is the normative issue of fairness, of distributional justice. This theme integrates these three areas to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the nature of inequality, and to prepare them to contribute thoughtfully to the ongoing public dialog over issues of wealth, power, and inequality.

Foundation course:
1 course required:

MATH    155    Statistic Tests for Inequalities    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: Completion of General Education Breadth Area A4 requirement.

1 course selected from:

PHIL    126    Justice and Human Rights    3.0    FS *

R S    154    Power/Justice in World Religions    3.0    Inq *

1 course selected from:

ECON    140    Work, Wealth, & Income Distrbtn    3.0    FS *

SOCI    190    Sociology of Wealth & Inequality    3.0    FS *

THEME T: THE CHILD

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Brad Glanville, MODC 101.

As we move into the 21st century, it is vital to remind ourselves that children are society’s most important resource. How a society values and raises its children augurs much about the future of that society. This theme is designed to help students learn about children’s physical, psychological, emotional, and social development, and how growth and development are impacted by the environments in which children are raised—from smaller family units to larger cultural systems.

However, this theme is about more than the biological and behavioral study of child development. This theme also considers development in the light of a broader and deeper examination of historical and contemporary conceptualizations of childhood as revealed in world literature and philosophies. Furthermore, this theme provides students the opportunity to examine a wide range of critical and persistent social, political, economic, health, and moral issues children and their presence in society raise, both generally and as individuals.

Foundation course:
1 course selected from:

C D    162    Issues in Child Development    3.0    FS *

PSY    140    Aids/Aides/AIDS Iss Child Psych    3.0    FS *

1 course selected from:

BIOL    118    Biology of Childhood    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: One biological sciences course.

HCSV    163    Child Health    3.0    FS *

1 course selected from:

ENGL    102    Literature of the Child    3.0    FA *

PHIL    127    Moral Issues in Parenting    3.0    FS *

THEME U: CATASTROPHE AND HUMANITY

Note: This theme has been modified from the printed catalog according to Presidential Executive Memorandum 04-44, effective Fall 2004

Theme Coordinator: Karin Hoover, PHSC 115.

All human societies have pondered the meaning of catastrophe as they have experienced, planned for, and recovered from disasters and catastrophic events. This theme explores the range of human responses to catastrophe, not only grief and dismay but also resilience and hope. It provides a variety of perspectives on some perennial issues that societies confront as they seek to adapt to an often unstable and unpredictable world: understanding the relationship between society and nature, the role of civilization in managing crises, the social construction of “normality,” the inevitability of change, and the search for meaning.

1 course required:

GEOS    155    Geologic Hazards    3.0    FS *

Prerequisites: One course from Breadth Area B1 and one course from Breadth Area B2 of General Education requirements.

1 course selected from:

HIST    113    Catastrophes & Human History    3.0    SP *

R S    153    End of the World    3.0    Inq *

1 course selected from:

ANTH    112    Catclsmc Events in Human Prehist    3.0    FS *

GEOG    106    Geographies of Disaster    3.0    FS *