Early Outreach and Support Programs

Annual Report 2021-2022 Early Outreach and Support Programs

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM

I. MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) is to provide access and support services to first-generation college students who have experienced economic, educational, and/or environmental barriers, but display the potential to succeed in post-secondary education and to assist the university in the matriculation, retention, and graduation of EOP students.

Department Goals (Last reviewed July 2022):

  1. EOP will provide a comprehensive program of support services that will enhance the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary for the academic success and the social and emotional personal development of EOP students. (Division goals 1, 2, 3; University strategic priorities 1, 3)
  2. EOP will promote social, cultural, and ethnic diversity in the CSU, Chico campus population. (Division goal 2; University strategic priorities 4, 7, 8)
  3. EOP will educate and inform students, faculty, and staff about program services and accomplishments. (Division goal 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 2, 4, 5, 8)
  4. EOP professional staff will maintain currency in the fields of college student retention, academic advising and obstacles encountered by first-generation and other historically marginalized college students through memberships in professional organizations, reading appropriate research journals, and professional development opportunities. (Division goals 1, 2; 3; University strategic priorities 2, 4, 5, 8)
  5. EOP will encourage student participation and involvement in the CSU, Chico campus community and the community of Chico as a whole. (Division goals 1, 2; University strategic priorities 1, 4, 6, 7, 8)

DEPARTMENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Successfully continued EOP services in a virtual modality in addition to encouraging students to take advantage of in-person resources
  • Continued to support students’ technology needs by providing calculators, laptops and iClickers
  • Increased use of social media platforms; specifically, Instagram and Google Currents, as a way to engage students
  • Successfully facilitated our in-person FYE culminating event at the end of the fall semester
  • Strengthened partnership with Academic Advising Programs with increased department collaboration
  • EOP support and representation in several of the Advancing Equity committees
  • EOP representation on the Student Learning Fee committee

Highlights:

  • Successfully continued EOP services in a virtual modality in addition to encouraging students to take advantage of in-person resources: EOP advisors continued to support students’ preferences as to which option of services worked best for individual students. There were increased email and call campaigns in the following areas: informing students about the vaccination policy, outreach to students who were under enrolled and general outreach to encourage students to visit the office in person.
  • Strengthen partnership with Academic Advising Programs with increased department collaboration: EOP collaborated with AAP and the College Academic Retention Specialists to provide training. EOP also partnered with AAP to pilot a recruitment and training program for student interns. If this partnership proves successful, this will provide more opportunities for collaboration for hiring and training EOP interns and paraprofessionals.
  • EOP representation in several of the Advancing Equity committees: in addition to several EOP staff serving as co-chairs of Advancing Equity committees, EOP provided essential support to the Advancing Equity peer mentoring research and collaborated on establishing student learning outcomes for first year advising practices.

Diversity Efforts:

  • Active participation and support in the First-Generation Staff organization
  • Continued partnership with the Adelante program (collaborative student trainings and co-sponsored workshops)
  • Staff assists in coordination and support of many of our Multicultural Welcomes and Graduation Celebrations

CHANGES IN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

  • EOP admissions continued to admit freshman applicants during spring 2022, all in attempt to aid the University in meeting undergraduate admission targets.
  • EOP admissions continues to evolve and use innovative practices to increase enrollment and provide access. Summer Bridge 2022 was an optional program (for admitted CSU eligible students and mandatory for all exceptional admits) to allow for one of the largest summer bridge classes. 250 admitted EOP students were invited to summer bridge and 159 attended the six-day program.

RESOURCES SUMMARY

Resource Allocation:
EOP General Fund Budget Allocation 21/22$661,398.97
Encumbered rollover 20/21$0
Work Study allocation 21/22 (EOP only) $50,000.00
Total Allocation$711,398.97
Annual Expense + Encumbered($532,597.18)
Unused Work Study$ (86.35)
EOP General Fund Balance$178,715.44
Summer Bridge Annual Allocation$255,403.92
SB rollover 20/21$17,747.97
Annual Expense + Encumbered - Summer Bridge (2020)$(89,861.31)
Summer Bridge Balance$183,290.58

Note: The balances for both EOP and SB funds were still impacted by COVID-19 which resulted in less spent due to no travel, minimal programming, professional development and a smaller cohort class for our residential Summer Bridge program.

Human Resources
EOP continues to experience multiple transitions and currently has two vacancies. We were able to add an e-hire at the end of May to help with our administrative support. The strain of not having a complete team is definitely being felt by our existing team members. Our unit’s current capacity to fulfill the needsof our students is being challenged due to our incomplete team. It is essential for our program to reach full staffing capacity to continue to be successful in serving our first generation, historically low-income students.

Facilities/Equipment

  • New laptop was purchased for our new office manager.

PROGRAM ASSESSMENT OF PAST YEAR

Program Objectives for 2021-2022

*Note:due to the transition of providing services virtually and in person, the majority of program objectives will remain unchanged to allow EOP advisors the opportunity to focus on providing services to the students with the greatest academic needs.

  1. EOP will continue to meet with all continuing students who are on academic probation.

    Ongoing - While it remains too difficult to engage students virtually who are on academic notice, EOP did see an increase of students coming into the office physically to meet with paraprofessionals and advising staff. With the hire of the new EOP assessment coordinator in spring 2022, EOP will increase efforts to engage this population.
  2. Enhance virtual and physical support to students equally, during the hybrid fall semester. With paying particular attention to the fall 2020 cohort and those participants of the Second Year Success program.

    Met -EOP student Interns continued to provide support to professional staff in addressing the needs of our second year EOP students. Several surveys were conducted along with increased reiteration for students to comply with the requirements outlined in the Second Year Success contract. The assessment coordinator will use the results from the surveys to assist in establishing objectives for fall 21 cohort that will participate in the SYS program.
  3. Continue to enhance support for our students, especially first-year, through communication via electronic technology and social media.

    Met/Ongoing- The EOP FYE Coordinator lead the Parapro team in establishing a consistent presence on social media. Along with the EOP Public relations Intern, the EOP Instagram account saw an increase in followers and activity. This mode of communication allowed our department to interact with our student population, while encouraging the use of campus resources. Our department continues to purchase laptops to ensure our students have access to aid in their education.
  4. Will continue to focus on professional development and more intentional programming for our continuing students.

    Ongoing - This specific objective will remain a priority for our department. The constant instability of the EOP professional staff due to all the personnel changes has made it difficult to take advantage of professional development opportunities offered beyond the campus sponsored events.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts:

Admissions CategoryFall 2017Fall 2018Fall 2019Fall 2020Fall 2021
Breakdown by Admissions Category: EOP Bonafide Enrolled (Primary Goals 1 and 2)
Admissions CategoryFall 2017Fall 2018Fall 2019Fall 2020Fall 2021
Freshmen Exception37230213
Freshmen Regular156171165162158
Transfer Exception00902
Transfer Regular546814868105
Transfer Regular “S”00000
Total247262322251268

Breakdown by Admissions Category: Non-bona Fide EOP Enrolled (Primary Goal 1 and 2)
Admissions CategoryFall 2017Fall 2018Fall 2019Fall 2020Fall 2021
Freshmen Exception10000
Freshmen Regular10000
Transfer Exception00900
Transfer Regular00000
Transfer Regular “S”00000
Total20006

EOP Ethnicity Of Enrolled Admits – Fall Semesters (Primary Goal 2)
EthnicityFall 2017Fall 2018Fall 2019Fall 2020Fall 2021
EXCREGEXCREGEXCREGEXCREGEXCREG
African American7271022330624212
American Indian0204042513
Asian American242028039019023
Filipino0000000000
Mexican American271009983182121440160
Other Latino0000000000
Pacific Islander0001020101
Unknown05260270205
White/Non-Latino225119043123035
2 or More Ethnicities01011017012021
Total38211232429314212303260

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)
Cohort: Fall 2014All EOP Freshmen
Total enrolled% persistence
Fall 2014214
Spring 201521098%
Fall 201519591%
Spring 201619089%
Fall 201617582%
Spring 201717381%
Fall 201716075%
Spring 201816075%
Fall 201811855%
Spring 20198540%
Fall 20194119%

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)
Cohort: Fall 2014All EOP Freshmen
Spring 20202110%
Fall 2020147%
Spring 202194%
Fall 202131%
Spring 202200%

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)
Cohort: Fall 2015All EOP Freshmen
Total enrolled% persistence
Fall 2015216
Spring 201621499%
Fall 201619188%
Spring 201718686%
Fall 201717380%
Spring 201816175%
Fall 201815572%
Spring 201915572%
Fall 201911252%
Spring 20208539%
Fall 20204219%
Spring 20212612%
Fall 2021136%
Spring 202273%

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)
Cohort: Fall 2016All EOP Freshmen
Total enrolled% persistence
Fall 2016195
Spring 201718997%
Fall 201717489%
Spring 201816585%
Fall 201814675%
Spring 201914675%
Fall 201913268%
Spring 202013067%
Fall 20209649%
Spring 20217237%
Fall 20214021%
Spring 20222814%

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)
Cohort: Fall 2017All EOP Freshmen
Total enrolled% persistence
Fall 2017195
Spring 201819097%
Fall 201817690%
Spring 201916886%
Fall 201915177%
Spring 202015077%
Fall 202014373%
Spring 202113971%
Fall 20219649%
Spring 20227538%

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)
Cohort: Fall 2018All EOP Freshmen
Total enrolled% persistence
Fall 2018195
Spring 201918695%
Fall 201917791%
Spring 202017087%
Fall 202015177%
Spring 202114373%
Fall 202112966%
Spring 202212765%

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)
Cohort: Fall 2019All EOP Freshmen
Total enrolled% persistence
Fall 2019174
Spring 202016886%
Fall 202015388%
Spring 202114181%
Fall 202113075%
Spring 202212371%

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)
Cohort: Fall 2020All EOP Freshmen
Total enrolled% persistence
Fall 2020184
Spring 202117495%
Fall 202114378%
Spring 202212266%

Persistence Data for Freshmen (Primary Goal 1)
Cohort: Fall 2021All EOP Freshmen
Total enrolled% persistence
Fall 2021161
Spring 202215294%

4- and 6-year Graduation Rates (Primary Goal 1)
CohortPercent of Cohort Graduating
Fall SemesterCount4 Year Grad Total4 Year Grad %6 Year Grad Total6 Year Grad %
199517595%3922%
199618821%4524%
1997180116%5832%
1998203105%6130%
1999220188%7735%
200017032%5633%
2001200105%6834%
2002211115%6330%
2003197126%8744%
2004160138%7446%
2005211157%9947%
2006214178%10348%
200717374%6236%
200820063%9447%
20092282511%12354%
2010215157%14467%

4- and 6-year Graduation Rates (Primary Goal 1)
CohortPercent of Cohort Graduating
Fall SemesterCount4 Year Grad Total4 Year Grad %6 Year Grad Total6 Year Grad %
2011237146%13858%
20122193315%11954%
20132112210%12760%
20142133617%13262%
20152153215%11955%
20161912815%9751%
20171953317%
20181944825%
2019174
2020183

Note: This is a new table for Graduation Initiative purposes.

EOP Total Student Enrollment Ethnicity (Primary Goal 2)
EthnicityFall 2017Fall 2018Fall 2019Fall 2020Fall 2021
African American11612712413497
American Indian1211131312
Asian American193172171144123
Filipino00000
Mexican American666591619606577
Other Latino00000
Pacific Islander53553
Unknown176556563
White\Non-Latino10196108113113
2 or More Ethnicities*3239344051
Total11261115112911201039

Total EOP Students by GPA (Primary Goal 1)
Spring 2018Spring 2019Spring 2020Spring 2021Spring 2022
GPA#%#%#%#%#%
3.5 +12014%12114%1391516319%19124
3.0 to 3.4920924%20424%2642929634%23530
2.5 to 2.9928232%28233%3013326030%20226
2.0 to 2.4922625%18922%1651813716%13317
1.99 & below516%567%354111%284
Total12014%852100%904100867100%789100
2.0 or better94%93%96%99%96%

EOP FTF Students by GPA* (Primary Goal 1)
Spring 2018Spring 2019Spring 2020Spring 2021Spring 2022
GPA#%#%#%#%#%
3.5 +33174524%4728%58335033
3.0 to 3.4944235932%5533%55323120
2.5 to 2.9948253921%3320%31182416
2.0 to 2.4933172815%1811%148149
1.99 & below3116158%159%1693322
Total189100186100%168100%174100152100
2.0 or better84%92%91%91%78%

Total EOP Students by Class Level (Primary Goal 1)
Spring 2018Spring 2019Spring 2020Spring 2021Spring 2022
GPA#%#%#%#%#%
Freshmen2041919519167161561514415
Sophomore2001919619210201821814018
Junior2722526726328312772728027
Senior4013738137368344154037740
Total1077103910371030941

Computer Lab Usage (Primary Goal 1)
SemesterTotal Students that used Computer Lab at Least OnceTotal EOP StudentsTotal Percentage
Fall 2012749120762.05
Spring 2013668117556.85
Fall 2013769125461.32
Spring 2014740120461.46
Fall 2014859127367.48
Spring 2015*000
Fall 2015744122060.98
Spring 2016775115966.87
Fall 2016736115163.94
Spring 2017672109961.15
Fall 2017**011500
Spring 2018746109068.44

Students That Came into The EOP Office
SemesterTotal Students That Came into The EOP OfficeTotal EOP StudentsTotal Percentage 
Fall 2018913113080.80%
Spring 2019968104992.28%
Fall 2019***747115064.96%
Spring 2020****566107352.75%
Fall 2021*****298103928.68%
Spring 202229293331.30%

Student Learning Outcomes

SLO #1 – As a result of participating in the English “Stretch Model”, students should be able to successfully pass ENGL 130. - This is the 12th year that ENGL 130 was moved to the spring semester. Students have the option to take English 130PW or 130W. English offered classes virtually and in person for the spring 2022 term, 83.8% of our first-year students passed the course on their first attempt.

SLO #2 – As a result of participating in the “Reality Check 101” series, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first semester - During the fall semester, students receiving two or more negative progress reports (C- or below) or who were referred by their paraprofessional advisor, were encouraged and invited to participate in Reality Check. Revisions were made to the format of Reality Check, to allow students to participate in a manner that allowed flexibility within our remote learning environment. These meetings are designed to strengthen academic performance and avoid academic probation. Topics included:

  • Helping students reflect on their academic performance
  • Identifying challenges or obstacles, on and off campus, from fall semester
  • Discussing academic probation (Chico or cumulative GPA below 2.0)
  • Discussing reality of disqualification (Chico or cumulative GPA below 1.5 for students with less than 30 units)
  • Goal setting by identifying three things the students will change to enhance their engagement and academic achievement
  • Reviewing course enrollment for spring 2022
  • Examining course drop options

SLO #3 – As a result of participating in “Fresh Start”, fewer students will be on academic probation after their first year. EOP first year students with a GPA below 2.0 after their first semester were invited to participate in an individualized adaptation of our “Fresh Start” spring workshop series. These individual meetings allowed the students to participate at their own pace while assisting them with identifying areas they were experiencing trouble and what resources were available to assist them in raising their GPA.

*Due to the departure of the FYE coordinator, data was not collected for this term. EOP will continue to facilitate a program that will address the needs of first year students that are on placed on academic notice by AAP.

VI. ANALYSIS

  • Proper assessment of EOP students and the services offered will be a priority. As we work to replace essential positions, EOP is creating a team that will provide critical feedback on how to improve services to our student population. Providing assessments to FYE, SYS, transfer and continuing students remains an essential element in ensuring EOP is serving students in the best manner possible.
  • Given the trends of higher education and career development, focusing on life-after-college preparation for our students will need to become a priority. While EOP has collaborated with the Career Center and the Adelante program, we will work to make these partnerships and the services more intentional to ensure our students are aware of the opportunities available.
  • EOP is diligently working with our Technology Specialist, to make sure EOP students, student workers and staff continue to get their technology needs met. During Summer Bridge, we were able to pilot the texting tool created by our Technology Specialist, as a way to communicate with our first-year students. We will encourage all EOP students to opt in to this texting tool and continue to implement innovative strategies to increase student engagement.

VII. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES FOR 2022-2023

  1. EOP will actively connect with all continuing students who are on academic notice and will encourage students to take advantage of resources available to aid in improving their academic performance.
  2. Re-establish the EOP Student Association.
  3. Increase support to EOP students that have spent the majority of their college career learning remotely.
  4. Will encourage staff to participate in at least one professional development opportunity during the year.
  5. Create opportunities to encourage EOP students to engage with the EOP office and staff in-person.

DREAM CENTER

I. MISSION STATEMENT

The Chico State Dream Center serves as a student success and resource center for the hundreds of undocumented students currently enrolled, as well as, other students from mixed-status immigrant families. We advocate for, and facilitate, equitable access to educational opportunities; and support student success and well-being in a welcoming, safe, and supportive environment.

Department Goals

  • The Dream Center will inform and educate the campus community about policy updates, program services, and diverse academic and personal needs of dreamer students (University Strategic Priority 1)
  • The Dream Center will promote and enhance access to inclusive and equitable academic, career, and community service opportunities through collaborative relationships with student support services to reduce academic and financial barriers (University Strategic Priority 1,2)
  • The Dream Center staff will maintain currency in the field of immigration policies and court cases through CSU statewide trainings, webinars, and professional development opportunities (University Strategic Priority 1,2)
  • The Dream Center will serve the immigration services needs of the campus community and their family members to continuously support the success of their academic and personal lives (University Strategic Priority 1)

DEPARTMENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Successfully recruited and hired 5 student employees, including receptionists and interns, to further support program needs
  • Successfully hired and onboarded the Dream Center’s coordinator as a Student Services Professional (SSPII)
  • Compiled and generated lists pertaining to housing, scholarships, and internships that do not require proof of citizenship or provide an alternative to a co-signer
  • Participated in recruitment events such as Choose Chico, resource fairs, and Steps to College that was hosted by the Mexican Consulate. Participated in Giving Day and raised over $2,200.
  • Continued partnership with immigration legal services provider, The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights (CHIRLA), to provide free services to Chico State students, staff, faculty, alumni, and immediate family members
  • Executed three legal services campus and community wide webinars on topics such as: overview of student legal services, DACA and advance parole, and freedom of information act
  • Attended CSU and California Community College system wide trainings pertaining to AB 540, residency, visa’s, and special immigrant juvenile status
  • The Dream Center transitioned into being overseen by the Director of Early Outreach and Support Programs. In the same semester, the Dream Center celebrated the 5-year anniversary of their establishment on campus
  • Dream Center professional and student staff were highlighted on Action News Now after speaking on the benefits of the Californian’s for All College Corps program on Chico State AB 540 students
  • Provided textbook grants and lending for 19 students
  • Continued supporting students and prospective students through 1 on 1 communication and referrals
  • Emailed bi-weekly and monthly newsletter to over 120 students on listserv. Students are notified of upcoming webinars, workshops, resources, external legal services available, scholarship opportunities, and East Wing services available.
  • The Dream Center sought and secured grants in the total of $15,600 and this amount matched the university’s stateside allocation for operating expenses dollar-for-dollar

Highlights

Textbook funding: The Dream Center secured a grant to fund textbook, calculator, or laboratory materials to Chico State undocumented students who have demonstrated unmet financial need. A total of 19 students benefited from the textbook grant and received paperback textbooks, e-books, book access codes, and school materials. On average, grants awarded were $171 per participant. Textbook funding will continue into the Fall 2022 semester for incoming and returning undocumented students.

Partnership with Legal Services Provider: In the past, CHIRLA provided in-person services and with COVID-19, services were transitioned virtually. Not all students respond to virtual services in the same way. It can be overwhelming and frightening to disclose their status and not know who is one the other end of the zoom call. As a result, bi-weekly meetings were scheduled between the coordinator and the CHIRLA liaison. One of the ways to promote legal services and the team was to highlight each attorney on social media with a biography that included their background information and their passion for serving students and the immigrant community. This was extremely helpful because it eased some of the student’s hesitation in scheduling appointment and they were able to see a picture of who they would possibly be meeting with.

In collaboration with CHIRLA, the Dream Center hosted three campus and community wide webinars to promote and increase services provided. Webinar topics included an overview of student legal services, DACA, advance parole, and the freedom of information act. The total attendance for the three webinars were 21 students and staff. 66% of attendees were students and 33% were staff, with 85% of all attendees identifying as Hispanic or Latinx. All webinars were conducted in webinar style to maintain the confidentiality of all participants.

Continuing to Support Students 1 on 1: With the hiring and onboarding of a full-time coordinator, the number of students utilizing the center increased. This was also a result of hiring student receptionists and interns that would greet all students and remind them to sign-in. The continuation of supporting students fluctuated with the presence of a dedicated Dream Center staff member available for walk-ins and scheduled appointments. Services included, but not limited to: academic advising, textbook funding, California Dream Act Service Incentive Grant information, scholarship opportunities and application assistance, check-ins (academic, health, wellness, life outside college), general center information, legal services referrals, employment, career, financial aid, and referrals to East Wing and campus departments. A total of 59 students were seen between January – May 2022. 77% of the 1 on 1’s was on a walk-in basis and 23% were virtual or over the phone.

Diversity Efforts

  • Translated and printed outreach flyers in Spanish to reach our diverse student and parent population
  • Hired student employees that reflect the diversity of our students
  • Participated in hiring biases and safe zone ally campus trainings
  • Incorporated bilingual conversations during student led workshops
  • Chicano Latino Council

CHANGES IN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
N/A

RESOURCES SUMMARY

Resource Allocation:
EOP General Fund Budget Allocation 21/22 - $67,076.64
Encumbered rollover 21/22 - $0.00
Work Study allocation 21/22 (DRMC only) -  $3,500.00

Total Allocation -  $70,576.64
Annual Expense + Encumbered - ($61,306.40)
Unused Work Study -  ($567.36)
DRMC General Fund Balance -  $8,702.88

NOTE: The remaining balance was due to salary savings.

Human Resources

  • Hired the Dream Center’s Student Services Professional (SSPII) to serve as the coordinator. This is the Dream Center’s first designated professional since the center’s establishment in 2017. The SSPII was initially hired on a 10/12 pay plan in January and increased time base in March to 12/12 employee. 

 Facilities/Equipment

  • The Dream Center is currently in a shared space with PATH Scholars. The two programs will share a combined space with new furniture that will include a lounge area, computer lab, study area, and new reception desk.
  • Although the Dream Center is in a shared space, space allocation is crucial for confidentiality purposes and to best meet the needs of the hundreds of Dreamers at Chico State.

PROGRAM ASSESSMENT OF PAST YEAR

Program Objectives for 2021-2022

  • With the onboarding of the SSPII coordinator in January of 2022, this is the first annual report that is completed by the Dream Center.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts

Service Usage Summary

Dream Center Visits
Fall 2019Spring 2020AY Total
Number of Student Visits1,220687*1,907
Fall 2021Spring 2022AY Total
Number of Student Visits220406626

*Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021: Incomplete data due to COVID-19 campus closure

Dream Center Individual Advising 2021-2022 – Number of Services Provided
Received academic guidance, textbook assistance11
Received information in applying to the California Dream Act Service Incentive Grant7
Received assistance in scholarship search and application process5
Individual one on one wellness, health, and personal check-ins17
Received general center information, resources and services available17
Received legal services appointment guidance13
Received career and employment guidance6
Received assistance in California Dream Act Application3
Total Number of Services Provided77

CHIRLA Immigration Legal Services 2021-2022 – Number of Participants Served
Fall 2021Spring 2022
Legal Consultation 1:1 Appointments1915
Services Provided*25
Total Services Provided2120

*Services provided include DACA renewals and assistance with USCIS forms

VI. ANALYSIS

  • Visits to the Dream Center have increased with the presence of student receptionists staffing the front desk and reminding students to sign in. However, the front desk was staffed 75% of the time, meaning that the number of sign-ins does not accurately reflect visits to the center. The addition of a student receptionist in the upcoming academic year should mitigate this challenge.
  • This year was successful in incorporating legal services webinars that were presented by CHIRLA. Although the total attendance for all three webinars was 21 participants, not all registered participants joined and others were unable to attend overall. Moving forward, an ongoing established relationship between the SSPII and students will lead into student interest topics and as a result, increased attendance. As in-person services are sought, the Dream Center will give opportunity for in-person interactions between CHIRLA and students.
  • The Dream Center needs to focus more on life-after-college and discuss what that means for undocumented students who are not DACA recipients. We can partner with the Career Center and ADELANTE! Program to discuss graduate school and entrepreneurship options.
  • Data presented in this report is quantitative and collected from Qualtrics spreadsheets. In order to improve services and meet student needs, confidential qualitive data needs to be collected. We need to focus on capturing the student perspective and needs yet collect data in a safe and confidential way.
  • After a successful year of the textbook fund grant, the Dream Center will continue to seek and obtain supplemental funds such as the Student Learning Fee fund. However, the Dream Center’s operating expenses budget is on a one-time basis and have never had a base allocation for operating expenses. This is crucial to continue to support the success of undocumented students and success of the center that include student assistants, web services, printing, supplies, etc.

VII. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES FOR 2022-2023

  1. The Dream Center aims to increase the utilization of legal services from our currently enrolled students and staff by providing a minimum of three legal services webinars and one DACA clinic every semester in virtual and in-person modalities.
  2. The Dream Center will focus on continuing professional development for faculty and staff by providing at minimum one Dreamer Ally training in the academic year through collaborating with campus partners and the legal services provider.
  3. The Dream Center will continue progress towards intentional programming on post-graduation academic and entrepreneurship opportunities by hosting a minimum of two workshops facilitated by campus and external partners each semester in the academic year.

FOSTER YOUTH PROGRAM (PATH SCHOLARS)

I. MISSION STATEMENT

PATH Scholars, in conjunction with the campus Foster Youth Committee, is dedicated to the higher educational needs of former foster youth and unaccompanied homeless youth. We will enhance access to the California State University, Chico community through collaborative efforts with other college network and community partners. For those identified as former foster youth and unaccompanied homeless youth, we will develop stability by acting as a liaison with campus and community resources. Our goal is to cultivate successful, proficient, and self-aware citizens in pursuit of their degree and beyond.

Department Goals (Last reviewed July 2022)

  • Inform and educate the campus community about this population. (Division goal 1; University strategic priorities 1, 2, 4, 8)
  • Provide leadership and networking opportunities through campus and community collaboration. (Division goals 1, 2, 3; University strategic priorities 1, 4, 7, 8)
  • Increase access, retention and graduation rates for this population. (Division goals 1, 2, 3; University strategic priorities 1, 4, 8)

II. DEPARTMENTAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Successfully returned to 100% on-campus services, while also providing hybrid format for students still enrolled solely online.
  • Presented to PEO (Philanthropic Educational Organization) group to educate and partner with more local community organizations.
  • Participated in the public comment portion of a virtual Senate Budget Hearing meeting to advocate for $12 million funding to standardize Foster Youth Program budgets across the CSU system.
  • PATH Scholar students were featured in Chico State Today/Chico Statements magazine(opens in new window)
  • This year saw the highest number of graduates so far – 22! (20 undergraduates and 2 graduate level)
  • Celebrated our graduating students in a variety of ways, including the EOSP Graduation Celebration, Butte County Graduation and our own virtual celebration.
  • Celebrated the 5-year anniversary of the PATH Scholars Center (physical location).
  • Increased collaboration with Dream Center, which allowed us to optimize the shared space more and lead to the purchase of new furniture for the entire Center!
  • Honored National Foster Care Month in May by coordinating a variety of events and activities for students, campus partners and local stakeholders. Collaborated with our partner agencies, including Butte College Inspiring Scholars, Butte County Office of Education, Children Services Division, Butte County Independent Living Program and Youth and Family Programs.
  • In partnership with University Advancement, PATH Scholars was selected for a special Regional Rumble 30-hour crowdfunding competition which raised $4,000 from 29 donors, specifically for our welcome baskets for new incoming students.
  • Received $25,000 donation from the Warren Family Trust to continue in supporting PATH Scholar students.

Highlights

  • PATH Scholars was featured in Chico State Today/Chico Statements magazine. Another honor during National Foster Care Month (May) was that PATH Scholars was selected for a feature article in the Chico State Today/Chico Statements magazine. Writer Sean Murphy met with and interviewed five PATH Scholar students – two continuing students, two that were graduating with their undergraduate degree in that same month and one alum who graduated in 2017. The article beautifully illuminated these students, their challenges, but most importantly their achievements and all that they have overcome. Their stories were powerful and highlighted their journey at Chico State.
  • PATH Scholars was selected for a special Regional Rumble 30-hour crowdfunding competition which raised $4,000 from 29 donors, specifically for our welcome baskets for new incoming students. PATH Scholars continues to partner with University Advancement. Acting treasurer for our campus Foster Youth Committee is part of the Advancement team, and she is always looking for ways to connect PATH Scholars with additional funding. When this Regional Rumble opportunity arose, she suggested PATH Scholars as the receiving program and we were selected! A fun competition between Chico State alumni in California and Colorado yielded $4,000 to easily support the procurement of welcome baskets for our new incoming students for Fall 2022.

Diversity Efforts

  • Participated in Listening Sessions for Chief Diversity Officer
  • Newer staff participated in Diversity Certificate Program
  • Presented to several foster youth (from foster care agencies and schools throughout the state) in collaboration with Campus Special Tours.
  • Continued regular events with campus partners (Butte College and Shasta College) to strengthen transfer pipeline.
  • Services continue to be offered to older and re-entry students with a foster care background. There has been an increase in this student population seeking additional services as active PATH Scholar participants.

III. CHANGES IN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

N/A

IV. RESOURCES SUMMARY

Resource Allocation

FYP General Fund Budget Allocation 21/22 - $110,927.00
(No rollover from 20/21)
Work Study Allocation 21/22 (FYP only) - $0
Total Allocation -  $110,927.00
Annual Expense (GF) + Encumbered - ($110,635.50)
FYP General Fund Balance -  $291.50

Note: Professional staff salaries included within the EOP General Fund allocation.

Human Resources

N/A

Facilities/Equipment

The PATH Scholars Center continues to be a shared space with the Dream Center, which is not conducive to the goals and priorities of both programs. However, towards the end of the 21/22 fiscal year, both programs partnered and leveraged funds for new furniture as we also opened up the Center to optimize the use of the existing shared space. This allows for the opportunity to collaborate more and reduces the optics of a divided space which includes two separate programs. While the goal of this is to offer a collective and community feel at the Center, the ultimate goal continues to be for each program to have its own designated space.

V. PROGRAM ASSESSMENT OF PAST YEAR

Program Objectives for 2021-2022:

  1. Continue to effectively support students in transitioning back to in-person. Met – Program staff worked diligently to return to in-person services for fall 2021. Many students continued with a 100% virtual learning environment for a variety of reasons, while others did, in fact, return to campus for in-person courses and services. We saw a slow return of students to campus in the fall, but more returned in spring 2022. To mitigate this trend, PATH Scholars offered a hybrid option to almost all services and activities. This strategy was highly effective, and was meeting students where they were at. If students wanted to meet in person, this opportunity was offered. If students still preferred to meet via zoom or phone because they were not in Chico or just felt more comfortable meeting remotely, this alternative was provided, as well.
  2. Implement diversity goals. Met/Ongoing – Program staff participated in trainings, such as the Diversity Certificate Program for the 21/22 academic year, and the inaugural CSU Juneteenth Symposium. In addition, program staff incorporated the Chico State “Land Acknowledgement” to their email signature, as well as it being recorded on the PATH Scholars website. Program staff will continue to search for professional development opportunities pertaining to diversity themes.
  3. Continue to advocate for a dedicated space solely for PATH Scholars. Ongoing – Regular discussions occurred throughout the academic year with University leadership, i.e. President Gayle Hutchinson and Senior Director for Division of Student Affairs. The EOSP Director is in complete support of this goal and has consistently advocated for these efforts. This objective will continue to be brought to the forefront of University leadership.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts

Foster Youth/Unaccompanied Homeless Youth and Grade Levels
Grade LevelSpring 2020Spring 2021Spring 2022
Freshman20 (15%)7 (6%)7 (6%)
Sophomore22 (16%)19 (17%)16 (13%)
Junior38 (28%)32 (29%)47 (37%)
Senior56 (41%)54 (48%)56 (44%)
Total136112126

Foster Youth/Unaccompanied Homeless Youth and Ethnicity
Spring 2020Spring 2021Spring 2022
White604247
Hispanic/Latino333441
Black/African American151312
Two or More Ethnicities/Race151517
Asian543
Native Hawaiian/Other Pac Islander211
American Indian/Alaska Native333
Not Specified/Decline302
Total136112126

Foster Youth/Unaccompanied Homeless Youth and Term GPA
Term GPASpring 2020Spring 2021Spring 2022
Below 2.021 (15%)14 (12%)39 (31%)
2.0 - 2.9939 (29%)41 (37%)31 (25%)
Above 3.076 (56%)57 (51%)56 (44%)
Total136112126

Foster Youth/Unaccompanied Homeless Youth and Cum GPA
Cum GPASpring 2020Spring 2021Spring 2022
Below 2.010 (7%)1 (1%)4 (3%)
2.0 - 2.9982 (60%)67 (60%)82 (65%)
Above 3.044 (33%)44 (39%)40 (32%)
Total136112126

Cumulative GPA for First Time Freshman
Cum GPA for Freshman2019/202020/212021/22
Below 2.04 (24%)1 (14%)4 (57%)
2.0 - 2.998 (47%)3 (43%)2 (29%)
Above 3.05 (29%)3 (43%)1 (14%)
Total1777

Tier II Student Retention Rates
Academic YearTotal Number of StudentsStudent Retention RateGraduates
2019/20 Tier II7090%10
2020/21 Tier II6896%18
2021/22 Tier II8685%22

PATH Scholars Center Visits
Fall 2019Spring 2020AY Total 
Number of Student Visits519246*765
Fall 2020Spring 2021 AY Total
Number of Student Visits-------**--------**-------
Fall 2021Spring 2022 AY Total
Number of Student Visits134230364

Note: *Spring 2020: Incomplete data due to COVID-19 campus closure. **Fall 2020 & Spring 2021 Academic year: Data not collected due to 100% virtual learning setting/PATH Scholars was closed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Note: A Student Learning Outcomes survey was sent out at the end of the academic year to 86 students (Tier II/active). Thirty-two students completed the survey (37% completion rate). The results of that survey inform the following:

SLO #1 – As a result of participating in the PATH Scholars Program, students will increase in their academic self-confidence and networking skills.

  • As a result of attending a PATH Scholars New Student Orientation and/or Welcome Reception (20 respondents), 90% of respondents stated that it was Extremely Helpful or Very Helpful to their overall success.
  • As a result of meeting with the PATH Scholars Academic Advising liaison to ensure being on track with courses and graduation plans (19 respondents), 74% of respondents stated that it was Extremely Helpful or Very Helpful to their overall success.
  • As a result of attending a Social Activity (23 respondents), 83% of respondents stated that it was Extremely Helpful or Very Helpful to their overall success.
  • As a result of historical “Networking” opportunities not being offered and/or being extremely limited this academic year, we were also not able to assess this area.

SLO #2 – As a result of participating in the PATH Scholars Program, students will develop and improve independent living skills, reducing their emotional stress and giving them more time to focus on academic goals.

  • As a result of attending PATH Scholars Independent Living Skills Workshops (15 respondents), 80% of respondents stated that it was Extremely Helpful or Very Helpful to their overall success.
  • As a result of working on Independent Living Skills during individual meetings with Program Staff (23 respondents), 91% of respondents stated that it made a Significant Impact or Moderate Impact to their overall success.
  • As a result of learning and practicing healthy coping skills to manage stress during individual meetings with the Program Staff (22 respondents), 91% of respondents stated that it made a Significant Impact or Moderate Impact to their overall success.
  • As a result of participating in PATH Scholars (31 respondents), 10% of respondents stated that it Completely assisted in overcoming challenges, 55% of respondents stated that it Considerably assisted in overcoming challenges and 19% of respondents stated that it Moderately assisted in overcoming challenges. PATH Scholars made a positive impact for 97% of respondents, even if it only made a Slight impact for 13% of respondents. Just one student reported that PATH Scholars made No impact at all to them overcoming challenges and further shared that they did not seek help from program staff and never disclosed what they were experiencing.

ANALYSIS

  • Overall, students continue to utilize PATH Scholars and the resources available to them to reach their academic goals. According to the Student Learning Outcome survey distributed after the end of this academic year, 100% of the respondents were Very Satisfied or Moderately Satisfied with their PATH Scholars experience. One survey participant stated, “On my most challenging days I could go into the PATH Scholars lounge, get a snack, sit down on the couch and decompress. I would visit with other scholars and feel like I was ready to face the next class. Not feeling alone in my daily struggles gave me comfort. When I would be in distress and overwhelmed I knew I could show up to Dawn's office and she would make time to HEAR me. I never wanted answers to my worries, I simply needed to be heard and supported and she did that very well. Marina was also always an ear with compassion and understanding. Priceless gifts those two ladies are.” This response demonstrates the critical need for programs such as PATH Scholars for students with incredibly unique needs.
  • The transition back to campus and in-person courses & services has had both advantages and challenges. While there was much excitement and energy about returning to “in real life” learning, we still saw low student numbers at the PATH Scholars Center and on campus, in general, for the fall 2021 semester. By spring 2022, we observed an increase in student numbers, but also still low in comparison to pre-pandemic times. Offering a hybrid format for our meetings, activities and workshops was a highly effective strategy to increase student participation.
  • Returning to in-person college life offered the ability to do more social activities. This is one of our paramount areas where students report that they enjoy, but more so, need these interactions with their PATH Scholar peers. It is extremely essential to their mental health, which ultimately aids in their academic success.
  • The virtual learning setting (due to the pandemic) continues to impact our first-time freshman numbers. We have observed single digit numbers since fall 2020 (only 7 students for two consecutive years), whereas prior to the pandemic, we saw a range of 17 (lowest) to 35 which was the highest since PATH Scholars began.
  • Additionally, the implications of the pandemic were revealed in our retention numbers for this academic year. We saw an increase in students struggling with countless life variables, which directly impacted their academic goals. We had more students take a Planned Education Leave or were Academically Disqualified than we’ve had in a few years.
  • Even with increased numbers overall for PATH Scholars, and our highest number of graduates thus far, the effects of the virtual learning/pandemic demonstrated a decrease in our overall retention rate this year of 85%. We will continue to support our students as best we can through these difficult times.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES FOR 2021-2022

  1. Resume a once per academic year student gathering with President Gayle Hutchinson as achieved in previous years.
  2. Collaborate with Dream Center by providing at least one collective event to ensure smooth transition for our students in our new Dream Center/PATH Scholars Center layout.
  3. Develop relationship with new Vice President of Student Affairs and Associate Vice President for Student Engagement and Retention Programs by sponsoring at least one intentional meet and greet event.

TRIO/EDUCATIONAL TALENT SEARCH

I. MISSION STATEMENT

Educational Talent Search (ETS) is committed to academically prepare and motivate low-income, first-generation college students for success in postsecondary education.

The Educational Talent Search program is aligned with CSU, Chico’s Mission, Values and Vision statements and the first strategic priority to “recruit, enroll, support, and graduate a diverse and high-quality student population.”

History at California State University, Chico

Educational Talent Search I (Funded in 1990 to serve 825 scholars) - the target population is comprised of scholars in grades 6 -12 who attend 15 target schools (Anna McKenney Intermediate, Bidwell Junior, Central Middle, CK Price Intermediate, Gray Avenue Middle, Las Plumas High, Live Oak High, Live Oak Middle, Marsh Junior High, Marysville High, Orland High, Oroville High, Pleasant Valley High, Willows High and Yuba City High) in four counties (Butte, Glenn, Sutter and Yuba).

Educational Talent Search II (Funded in 2006 to serve 503 scholars) - the target population is comprised of scholars in grades 6 -12 who attend 9 target schools (Chico Junior, Chico High, Gridley High, Hamilton Elementary, Hamilton Union High, Los Molinos High, Paradise High, Sycamore Middle and Williams Junior/Senior High) in five counties (Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Sutter and Tehama).

II. ETS ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Successfully recruited and served 1,065 low-income, first generation college scholars in grades 6th-12th at 24 target schools – scholars are motivated and prepared to attend college starting in 6th grade! On the average, approximately 70-90 ETS graduates enroll at CSU, Chico each fall.

New Staff – Mariana Gonzalez, Chico State graduate with a degree in Social Work, joined the ETS family as Support Specialist/Advisor. Jose Gonzalez-Ayala, Chico State graduate with degrees in Philosophy and Psychology, and Peter Yang, Chico State graduate with a degree in Parks, Hospitality and Recreation Management, were hired as Advisors. Mariam Yousif, Chico State graduate with a degree in Public Health, joined as Administrative Assistant. Daniela Hernandez and Roberto Zarate were hired as Paraprofessional Advisors. All bring valued skills, strengths and passion to serve ETS scholars and their families. We are fortunate to have them as a part of our team!

Monthly Workshops – we were excited to once again have ETS advisors visit their assigned schools each month! Advisors presented grade appropriate workshops and advising sessions on topics such as college requirements, career/major awareness, financial literacy, resumes, interview tips and writing personal statements. In addition, advisors guide seniors step-by-step through the college, financial aid, and educational support programs (EOP, SSS, EOPS and REACH) processes and applications. An ETS newsletter, social media, emails, phone calls and text messages were utilized to keep scholars informed of ETS services/events.

ETS Scholar’s Day hosted at Chico State (30 scholars) – one day event designed to motivate scholars to attend college and to be better prepared for their next academic year.
Dr. Cirilo Cortez, Associate Vice President for Student Engagement and Retention Programs, welcomed our scholars and shared his academic/career journey. Pepe Villaseñor, Financial Aid Advisor, presented a workshop about financial aid. The Office of Admissions facilitated a campus tour and gave an admissions presentation. ETS alumni that are currently enrolled at Chico State participated in a student panel where they shared about themselves, their college experience, and tips for high school/college success.

Nucleus Robotics (39 scholars) – a week-long, virtual hands on event which offered ETS scholars an opportunity to learn about STEM concepts. Sphero Robots were programmed to solve problems and perform activities utilizing JavaScript block coding. STEM learning was enlightening and fun with the Sphero Robots!

College Visit (event scheduled in July) – students in 11th and 12th grade will visit San Francisco State University, San Jose State University, and UC Berkeley. They will hear admissions presentations, learn about support programs and tour the campuses. Scholars will also be able to explore some of the beautiful San Francisco cultural sites.

Jumpstart to College (event scheduled in August) – one-day event hosted to combat summer melt for first time freshman attending college this fall. ETS staff and ETS Alumni will share resources on college campuses to promote academic success, tips to navigate in person and virtual learning, and what they wish they had known before going to college.

Support of ETS scholars that participate in Upward Bound Math/Science Programs
(49 scholars): six-week long summer academic programs designed to give scholars a college experience, develop academic skills, and excel in the fields of math and science.

  • Chico State Upward Bound Math/Science – 32 scholars
  • UC, Berkeley Upward Bound Math/Science – 16 scholars
  • Monterey Peninsula College Math/Science – 1 scholar

Support of Chico State ETS Alumni – scholars were once again welcomed to the ETS office to use computers, print schoolwork, get school supplies, and grab a snack. ETS staff serve as positive role models and check in with ETS alumni to see how they are doing academically and emotionally. This fosters a sense of belonging to remind students they are valued and provide support to encourage them to graduate from college. Monthly newsletters were emailed to all Chico State alumni to share resources and notify them of campus events. ETS alumni graduating from Chico State were recognized and celebrated for achieving their personal and academic goals!

Diversity Efforts:

  • Assure hiring practices and current staff reflect diverse student population in program and on campus – this last year our professional staff was comprised of Asian, Caucasian, Latinx and Middle Eastern staff.
  • Intentionality to recruit ETS scholars who are underrepresented populations for the program – males, American Indian, and African American.
  • Active involvement in Chicano Latino Council.

III. CHANGES IN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

ETS staff transitioned back to work in the office last August and were extremely excited to be able to visit school sites once again.

IV. RESOURCES SUMMARY

Resource Allocation – ETS is completing the first year of a five-year 2021-2026 grant cycle. For 2021-2022, both Chico State ETS grants were funded $735,170 annually to serve 1,325 scholars ($555 a student). We are able to successfully serve scholars on a very limited budget.

Human Resources – Sandra Jauregui accepted a Student Success Advisor position with the Chico State College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Construction Management Department. Mariana Gonzalez, Jose Gonzalez-Ayala, Peter Yang and Mariam Yousif were hired.

V. PROGRAM ASSESSMENT OF PAST YEAR

The following Annual Objectives data corresponds to the 2020-2021 academic year. Due to the U.S. Department of Education reporting requirements, Educational Talent Search grantees complete annual reports in November, therefore 2021-2022 data is not yet available. All other information included in this report corresponds to the 2021-2022 academic year.

Program Objectives:

  1. Secondary School Persistence: 90% of non-senior participants served each project year, will complete the current academic year and continue in school for the next academic year, at the next grade level.

    Exceeded – 100% of non-senior participants completed the current academic year and continued in school the next academic year, at the next grade level.
  2. Secondary School Graduation:
    • 85% of seniors served during the project year will graduate during the project year, with a regular secondary school diploma within the standard number of years.

      Exceeded – 100% of seniors graduated with a regular secondary school diploma.
    • 40% of seniors served during the project year, will complete a rigorous secondary school program of study and will graduate during the project year with a regular secondary school diploma within the standard number of years.

      Exceeded – 68% of seniors that graduated completed a rigorous secondary school program of study.
  3. Postsecondary Education Enrollment: 75% of participants who have graduated with a regular secondary school diploma during the project year, will enroll in an institution of higher education by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or will have received notification, by the fall term immediately following high school, from an institution of higher education, of acceptance but deferred enrollment until the next academic term (e.g., spring term).

    Exceeded79% of participants who have graduated with a regular secondary school diploma, enrolled in an institution of higher education the fall term immediately following high school graduation.

    Class of 2021 Postsecondary Enrollment – ETS strives to ensure that students get the information and assistance needed to select the postsecondary institution that best suits their needs and wants. On the average, approximately 70-90 ETS students enroll at Chico State each fall. The following summary provides an overview of which colleges the 2021 ETS senior class chose to attend:

    2021 Postsecondary Destinations by Institution (verified by National Student Clearinghouse)
    CollegeNumber of StudentsCollegeNumber of Students
    Avila University1San Jose State University1
    Brigham Young University, Idaho1Shasta College4
    Butte College123Sierra College1
    California Polytech University, Humboldt1Sonoma State University1
    California Polytech University, Pomona1University of CA, Berkeley3
    California Polytech University, SLO1University of CA, Davis6
    Chico State University27University of CA, Merced2
    California State University, Long Beach1University of CA, San Diego1
    California State University, Stanislaus1University of CA, Santa Barbara4
    Fresno State University2University of Southern CA1
    Kirkwood Community College1Vanguard University1
    Liberty University1William Jessup University2
    Montana State University, Bozeman1Woodland Community College2
    Sacramento State University6Yuba College11
    San Francisco State University1Not enrolled /Unknown62
     TOTAL ETS SENIORS:271
  4. Postsecondary Attainment: 40% of participants served during the project year who enrolled in an institution of higher education by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or by the next academic term (e.g., spring term) as a result of acceptance but deferred enrollment will complete a program of postsecondary education within six years.

    Exceeded – 60% of participants served in the 2014-15 postsecondary enrollment cohort earned a credential.

    Type of Degree & Number of Participants
    Type of DegreeNumber of Participants
    Certificate only5
    Associate Degrees23
    Bachelor's Degrees88
    Both an Associate & a Bachelor's18
    More than one credential (other combinations)25
    Total number of participants from the 2014-2015 cohort that earned a credential159
    Total number of participants from the 2014-2015 cohort that did not earn a postsecondary credential, or whose postsecondary attainment is unknown104
    Total number of participants from the 2014-2015 cohort263

Ongoing Assessment Efforts:
Annual Objectives for 2021-2022 –

Demographic Reporting

For the 2021-2022 academic year, 1,065 scholars were served by two ETS grants. Below is a demographic snapshot of the ethnicity of our student population, which is reflective of the schools we serve.

Educational Talent Search Ethnicities 2021-2022. Latino 65%, Caucasian 19%, Asian 11%, African American 2%, Native American 2%, Native Hawaiian 0%, two or more races 1%

Educational Talent Search Ethnicities 2021
TotalLatinoCaucasianAsianNative AmericanAfrican AmericanTwo or More RacesNative Hawaiian
1,0656842021202021133

VI. ANALYSIS

Our program’s goals are to academically prepare and motivate low-income, first generation college students for success in post-secondary education. We constantly evaluate our program to best serve our students’ needs. Our ongoing assessment efforts include an annual performance report submitted to the U.S. Department of Education, scholars’ evaluations after every event attended, and an overall program evaluation before scholars’ graduate. After closely assessing the program, staff meet in June to plan for the following year.

Below is a summary of the ETS college enrollment rates for the past ten years:

ETS college enrollment rates for the past ten years
Academic YearScholars ServedSeniorsSeniors that Applied to Financial AidSeniors Enrolled in Postsecondary Education
2020-20211,119271220 = 81%214 = 79%
2019-20201,256230210 = 91%192 = 83%
2018-20191,359242233 = 96%229 = 95%
2017-20181,387259253 = 98%249 = 96%
2016-20171,360281271 = 96%261 = 93%
2015-20161,355299287 = 96%272 = 91%
2014-20151,414285279 = 98%263 = 92%
2013-20141,306268260 = 97%244 = 91%
2012-20131,363291278 = 96%248 = 85%
  • A successful Annual Performance Report was submitted to the Department of Education where all program objectives were met! The six-year postsecondary completion for the 2014-2015 cohort of 263 scholars was 60%.
  • The past few years have been extremely difficult for the community due to the COVID19 pandemic. We are proud of the fact that we were able to support our scholars, families, schools, campus, community, and staff despite the tremendous adversity.

VII. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES FOR NEXT ACADEMIC YEAR

  • Recruit and serve 1,325 scholars!
  • Continue to survey the needs of our scholars and schools while providing much needed support for low-income, first generation college scholars. Serve scholars in person and virtually, in compliance with COVID-19 guidelines from CDC, Chico State and the school districts.
  • Recruit, hire and train new advisor and continue to provide professional development for all staff.

VIII. ETS Staff

Diana Parra-Villaseñor, Director
Kelsey Dixon, Academic Coordinator
Mariana Gonzalez, Support Specialist/Advisor
Jose Gonzalez-Ayala, Advisor
Peter Yang, Advisor
Mariam Yousif, Administrative Assistant
Daniela Hernandez, Paraprofessional Advisor
Roberto Zarate, Paraprofessional Advisor
Julieta Corona, Student Assistant
Sebastian Martin, Student Assistant

TRIO/STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

Note: Student Support Services is a TRIO program funded by the United States Department of Education to provide academic support services to students from low-income and first generation college-going backgrounds. The mission statement and program goals (objectives in the U.S. Department of Education framework) are specified by federal regulations and policies and cannot be altered without approval from a program officer at the U.S. Department of Education.

I. Mission Statement

The mission of Student Support Services (SSS) is to improve the academic standing, retention, graduation, and graduate and professional school enrollment rates of eligible students who are receiving project services.

Department Goals

Performance Objectives (required by the U.S. Department of Education)

  1. Persistence: 63% of all students served by the SSS Project will persist from one academic year to the beginning of the next academic year or graduate.
  2. Good Academic Standing: 92% of all enrolled participants served by the SSS Project will meet the performance of good academic standing (2.0 or above).
  3. Graduation: 61% of new participants served each year will graduate within six years.
    • These performance objectives are in alignment with division goals to increase the retention and graduation of students.
    • The services offered by SSS also contribute to recruitment efforts by reassuring students and their families that individualized support is available to students from disadvantaged backgrounds at CSU, Chico.
    • The date of last review was February 7, 2022 when the project submitted the TRIO Student Support Services Annual Performance Report (APR) to the U.S. Department of Education.

II. Departmental Accomplishments

  • Partnered with Academic Advising Programs to hire a Retention and Graduation Coach.
  • Hired our Student Development Coordinator.
  • Successfully met all Department of Education program objectives on retention, graduation, and persistence.
  • Successfully improved our TRIO Student Support Services application to make it accessible to recruited students.
  • Successfully returned to campus at high capacity in order to serve and offer all of our activities virtually to our 172 participants.
  • Continued to operate our 5-year funding that represents 1.4 million dollars to continue to accomplish our program goals.
  • Continued our partnership and collaboration with the Recreation, Hospitality, and Parks Management Department to allow our students to volunteer and experience the outdoors.
  • Further increased our study sessions to include the spring semester for all new first-year students.
  • Worked with 10 peer mentors to continue to offer services to our students.
  • Successfully transitioned to Chico State 360 in order to better fit university advising practices and advising tracking.
  • Partnered with the Cal-Fresh program to provide the best service to our program. This relationship continued as we transitioned back to campus.
  • Successfully recruited a new fall 2021 cohort amongst news from other SSS programs of difficulties of meeting their recruitment goals.
  • Participation in Chico State’s Giving Day and fundraising – this resulted in flexible money to help offset the restricted budget that we get from the Department of Education.
  • In partnership with the Financial Aid and Scholarship Office, we successfully awarded 31,500 dollars in grant aid to our income eligible students.
  • Increased our offered workshops to our students. Mainly in the area of Life After College series that works with our students who are within a year to graduation.
  • Required that all first-year participants, new transfer students, and students on AP to take the LASSI online assessment and follow it up with a one-on-one coaching session with a peer coach to discuss improving their approaches and strategies to their studies using proven-effective practices.
  • Refined our process for working with students on academic probation, and more closely supported our students to work with Academic Advising to receive help.
  • Required attendance at mandatory financial wellness workshops for all first-year and second year students.
  • Successfully assisted our students with new university grading policies to help them meet university grade point average requirements.
  • Unlike other university support programs, we have allowed online students to participate in our program.
  • Transitioned our contract services to an online format where students are able to more easily review where they stand with their requirements.
  • Offered mandatory fall semester seminar course for first year participants.
  • Continued to encourage participants to safely participate in civic engagement opportunities – these opportunities were online or locally in Chico.
  • Continued our transition to campus and were able to successfully move our department back to in-person and online services.

Highlights:

Recruitment
In years past, our TRIO program could easily rely on filling our grant’s participant numbers by recruiting many of the students that had been denied acceptance into the Educational Opportunity Program. Since the pandemic and drop in university enrollment, our program has had to shift our recruitment processes. We now highly rely on the partnerships with Office of Admissions, as we get a list of students who have declared their intent to enroll and have identified as first generation. This partnership also helps with their “freeze” goals to keep students engaged over the summer.

Our first-generation students made a return to campus with a variety of needs.

  • We served a lot of students – both in-person and online. We’ve made ourselves available to all of them. Since returning from the pandemic a shift has occurred in the type of student that we serve. Before the pandemic our program served only students who were in-person. The new shift has allowed us to start accepting students that are only online students.
  • The pandemic still continues to impact the learning of our first-generation college students. We had our largest number of students who decided to transfer out of Chico State due to health concerns, family care responsibilities, or challenges with paying for college in Chico.

Increased online student population. Change in shift from pre-virtual learning to now – we now are able to offer support to these students.

Our program operated over 3352 hours of both in-person and online services, and successfully continued all of our key and federally required services in an online format. We have creatively moved our identification and selection process into an online format. We continued to improve all three of our TRIO applications that were quickly moved into an online format to be more accessible for our students and not require students to pay for the cost of mailing in their applications. Since moving into our new online Cognito forms application, we have seen a large increase of submitted applications into our program. The use of the online form allows us to make a higher amount of contacts with first generation college students. These applications have been combined into one application in order to make it easier for students to complete. All applications now begin through our TRIO SSS website as an interest form and then go into an automated email from our Cognito form builder. Our program worked closely with Chico State Web Services to build an application that helped our staff and students.

Although we will continue to serve our online/virtual students, we will continue to grow our welcome activities in-person in collaboration with Associated Students and Facility Reservations. We will continue to offers two parent/ally welcome options that connects our program to the support systems of our students. This relationship is important to allow our program to win the support of the family, and hopefully convince them of the importance of supporting their students throughout college. Many of our first-time freshman students will be moving to Chico. While a little under half of our transfer students will be fully online students, and a majority will be moving to Chico. The new online cohort of students who are entering our program have different needs than our more traditional transfer students. Between our two groups of new students, we will continue to offer vital services to all students.

Online Application Improvements–
With the approval from Department of Education, our program is now able to receive and accept digital signatures. This was a major benefit for our program and our ability to improve our application. We have been using Cognito Forms, Qualtrics, and email communication in order to process applications. We have not completed our recruitment period for the summer, and we have already received more than 200+ applications.

Retention and Graduation Coach –
In partnership with Academic Advising Programs, we have participated in the recruitment and hiring of a Retention and Graduation Coach (RGC). Julie Heisler is paid through the Academic Advising Program, and works directly with our students and our program. Having her expertise in our program has allowed us to give our third year and beyond students more detailed connection. Our Retention and Graduation Coach provides advising and coaching to our third year and beyond students in one-on-one meetings and group workshops. Since arriving into our program, our RGC has meet with over 75% of our third year and beyond students to design and update their path towards graduation. Many students are challenged with changes in majors or a novice understanding of the graduation requirements. With the detailed support of the program, our students learn what each semester towards graduation looks like for them. With an understanding of how many semesters a student has remaining before graduation, the student is able to make plans on their financial aid, and possible minors or certifications. These discussions are helpful to our students who know they are only a few semesters from graduation so they should start planning to collect letters of recommendations and grad school applications. The Retention and Graduation Coach has been a large success in our program’s support of the graduation initiative.

Diversity Efforts:

  • Inclusion efforts – male participants – male participation has continued to be a challenge for our program and I understand that it is not unique to our program. This challenge has been around for our program since before 2016 and is an issue that we have working to overcome. Representation is an important piece to our program and we have continued to employee students who are representative of our student participants. Male participation has seen a small increase in our program over this last year. We highly seek and recruit male students into our program. We hope to begin offering male specific programing for the males in our program.
  • Equity and Education efforts – Diversity Workgroup –
    In the last year, the director of the program has participated in the newly formed diversity workgroup. The diversity workgroup was created under the direction of the Vice President of Student Affairs office to work with a group of professionals to understand the diverse needs of the professionals in the division. The workgroup was part of four other workgroups that were all created after the vice president recruited professionals from the division to lead the workgroups. Since co-leading the workgroup, the director recruited professionals from PATH Scholars, International Education and Engagement, Accessibility Resource Center, Athletics, Student Learning Center, and Upward Bound/API Council. Together the workgroup has established goals moving forward to assess the diverse needs of professionals in the division, and start to explore the possibility of finding a middle manager EDI training series. This workgroup led to the director to participate in the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity. At the conference, a possible training was found and ideas to bring back to the TRIO program were all collected.
  • Campus Collaboration, Representation, and Outreach
    • First Generation Faculty and Staff – The student development coordinator participated in First Gen Faculty and Staff committee meetings and events. He has now accepted the position of secretary on the association.
    • Latino/Chicano Council – The student development coordinator was a part of the Latino/Chicano Council. He attended multiple events and multiple meetings.
    • Hiring Committees – with so many open positions on-campus, the director has been called to multiple search committees. In each of the search committees the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion are at the forefront of evaluating each candidate.

III. Changes in Policies and Procedures

Our program has now accepted the largest cohort of online students in the liberal studies, sociology, and social work programs. These students have a wealth of diversity and needs that our program has identified as excellent candidates to receive support from our program. As we headed back to campus, the ability to serve and support online students was re-evaluated and led to our program deciding that we could easily serve online students. The students understand that they will have a different experience than our in-person student, and all of them are so thankful that we offer a connection to the university. The change to serve online students will give us the ability to continue to serve diverse students.

IV. Resources Summary

*Note: Fiscal year is based on a September 1, 2021 – August 31, 2022 timeline.

Budget Summary
SSS allocation for 2021-22$294,722
Rollover from 2020-2127,866
Total allocation for 2021-22322,588
Projected expenses*-315,250
Projected carryover balance7,338

Staffing:

In July of 2021, our previous Student Development Coordinator took another job on-campus with Basic Needs. They were a backbone for our program and for many students. As a result of this, many students did not visit our office as frequently, since they had the strongest relationship with our Student Development Coordinator. Working with Chico State Enterprises to get the position posted also slowed us down much more than we would have liked. The open position, plus the retirement of our administrative support person left our program severely short staffed. The director was left to operate the program without much other support until October of 2021. Even after the new Student Development Coordinator was hired, a long training process commenced.

Facilities/Equipment:

N/A

V. Program Assessment of Past Year

Program Objectives (Performance Objectives required by the U.S. Department of Education)

  1. Persistence: 69% of all students served by the SSS Project will persist from one academic year to the beginning of the next academic year or graduate.

    Of the 152* participants enrolled in 2020-21, 95% either graduated or have registered for the fall 2019 semester.
  2. Good Academic Standing: 91% of all enrolled participants served by the SSS Project will meet the performance of good academic standing (2.0 or above).

    Of the 152* participants enrolled in 2020-21, 98% were in good academic standing (GPA above 2.0) by the end of the academic year.
  3. Graduation: 59% of new participants served each year will graduate within six years.

    Of the 22 participants admitted into cohort 2016, 74% graduated within six years of their point of entry into the program.

*This does not include new first year participants or transfer participants admitted summer 2021.

Program Annual Objectives for 2020-2021

  1. Recruit, hire, and successfully onboard a new Student Development Coordinator into our TRIO SSS program.

    Outcome: Enrique Galvan was successfully recruited and hired into the Student Development Coordinator position.
    Chico State Enterprises was going through an unplanned change in staffing during our recruitment and interviewing period. This showed as we slowly moved to get the position posted, receive all the applicants and have time to interview all of them. This change made it so that the entire process lasted close to 12 weeks. The loss of support to the program and our students was impactful. Meetings got held up and students didn’t have anyone in our office to make an appointment to ask questions.

    Our new Student Development Coordinator is working super hard for the program, but still has a lot to learn since he hasn’t spent an entire year in the position yet. During both semesters some time was lost due to paternity leave or not being hired yet. We continue to advocate to Chico State Enterprises to update their HR processes.
  2. Compile and analyze recruitment data from the last three years of student recruitment in order to understand areas of improvement, areas of success, and areas that are broken. Use this data to continue to improve our recruitment and application process to yield healthy annual cohorts.

    Outcome: Successfully accomplished and currently active. With the implementation of our new application process, that incorporates Cognito forms, Qualtrics, and other emailing programs, we have been able to greatly increase how many applications we receive for our program. This has meant that we spend more time with more students who are potentially not eligible for our program, and we deny more applications into our program. This is a better problem to have compared to the low amount of applications our program received before making the changes to recruitment.
    In looking through the compiled data, we see that our annual applications have gone from 84 in 2019, 176 in 2020, and 218 in 2021. We continue to receive a lot of applications, but we still need to form more relationships to continue to make it easier for students to join our program.
  3. Create a partnership with the STAR Center in order to increase male involvement in our TRIO SSS program, and offer programming to male identifying students in order to increase retention and participation in activities.

    Outcome: Partial Success and still needs work.
    In the fall of 2021, major changes occurred within the STAR Center at Chico State. The former director received another position in the CCLC, and respectfully moved most of his men’s programming with him into the CCLC. In moving to the CCLC, the men’s programming became slowed for the semester and didn’t allow for a lot of partnership with our program. The new STAR Center plans on having a stronger relationship with the Student Learning Center and have a more academic focus for all students. The partnership for men’s programming has been put on a brief hiatus until another opportunity presents itself.
    However, in spring 2022, our program took it upon ourselves to start looking at possible workshops or content that we can start planning for our own men’s programming. We do not plan on duplicating services, but instead plan on having our programming compliment the programming that is coming out of the CCLC.

VI. Ongoing Assessment Efforts

Demographic Reporting

Federal legislation requires that SSS participants must be first generation college students (neither parent has a four-year degree), come from a low-income background, and/or have a documented disability. Two-thirds of students must be both low-income and first generation. SSS met these demographic requirements in 2021-22.

  • Gender – Female: 61% Male: 39%
Statistics on Program Usage
Table 1: SSS Individual Advising/ Coaching 2021-22 - Number of Participants Served
Total number of active participants during fall and spring semesters*172
Received individualized non-cognitive skills coaching172
Received advice and assistance in postsecondary course selection118
Received education/counseling to improve financial literacy162
Received information in applying for Federal Student Aid143
Received assistance in completing and applying for Federal Student Aid153
Received assistance in applying for admission to Graduate School19
Received study abroad or National Student Exchange advising11
Fully online students in TRIO SSS5
Received Career and professional development advising/coaching171
Total number of individual advising/coaching sessions 2021-22956
*Does not include students admitted during the summer of 2022

VII. Analysis

  • Continue to hire staff that is representative of the Chico State students and the students that we work with in the program. This goal includes both professional and student staff – with the latest transition of our past Student Development Coordinator in July 2021, this provides an opportunity for our program to continue to grow and diversify our staff. Our program primarily serves Hispanic first-generation students and it is important for university diversity, and representation that we have students that have staff that understand and have closely worked with students from similar backgrounds of those that we serve in our program. Our newest Student Development Coordinator is a person that comes from similar backgrounds as our students. He is a first-generation college student that was low-income. He is from northern California and knows what it’s like to come from a Hispanic family. He has already begun to form strong relationships with our students.
  • Improve our First Year Experience seminar – Since taking over the first-year experience seminar, the course has suffered from poor planning and no direction. We have started looking at developing learning outcomes for the course and have directed course sessions for each meeting. We are heavily working with one of our Academic Coaches to develop a foundation for us to lesson plan each week and improve the course. As a liberal studies student with experience in the classroom he is pushing us in the right direction.
  • Continue to increase recruitment efforts toward underrepresented groups – Having our new online students has given us the opportunity to work with new diverse students. Online students tend to be parents, formerly incarcerated, or facing higher difficulties with income. Working with these students has allowed us to further extend our services to students in need. This will mean that we will have different programming before classes get started, and during the semester more online programming will continue. Many of our online students will be from similar majors so we will do our best to create community with them online.
  • Continue to seek and obtain supplemental funds – We have had fairly successful Giving Days in the past two years. Our fundraiser is more successful each year, but it isn’t enough to run our full program. It’ll be important to seek funding from other sources each year. The U.S Department of Education imposes strict guidelines governing the use of project funds to pay for food and hospitality. This presents a challenge when scheduling overnight field trips, as well as daylong workshops and trainings for project participants from low-income backgrounds who cannot afford to supply their own meals/accommodations. With the increase of need now that we are starting to use on-campus and in-person activity, it’ll be vital that we secure supplemental funds. We hope to continue with our successful fundraising campaign that we completed in February as part of the university’s Giving Day. These funds are extremely limited and will not cover the expenses of an entire year of programming.
  • Continue to tie grant aid to completion of TRIO SSS agreements – Our TRIO Agreements continue to be such an important part of our success. We will continue to use each of our agreements at tools to meet our requirements from the Department of Education and help our students succeed. Quantitative (cumulative GPA) and qualitative (student evaluations) data for first year and 2nd year participants indicate that the activities required by the 1st and 2nd year student support plans have a positive impact on student success in all areas pre-identified as important by our competitive grant priorities.

VII. Program Objectives for the next academic year

Program Annual Objectives for 2022-2023

  1. Collaborate with the Chico State Admissions Office in order to review the transcripts that their office receives from each of the students that also applies for our program.
  2. Expand study sessions past the first year into the second and possible third year. Second year students often describe that they miss the weekly facilitated study sessions. This will allow us to give voluntary study sessions for our second-year students.
  3. Grow our partnerships with Regional and Continuing Education to improve our service of online and virtual students who join our TRIO program.

TRIO/UPWARD BOUND PROJECTS

Note: Upward Bound is a TRIO program funded by the United States Department of Education to provide academic support services to low-income, first generation college bound high school students. The mission statement and program goals (objectives in the U.S. Department of Education framework) are specified by federal regulations and policies and cannot be altered without approval from a program officer at the U.S. Department of Education.

I. MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Upward Bound is to increase the rate at which participants complete secondary education and enroll in and graduate from institutions of postsecondary education.

Department Goals (Performance objectives dictated by the U.S. Department of Education)

  1. Academic Performance Grade Point Average (GPA): 60% of participants served during the project year will have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better on a four-point scale at the end of the school year.
  2. Academic Performance Test: 40% of UB seniors served during the project year, will have achieved at the proficient level on state assessments in reading/language arts and math.
  3. Secondary School Retention and Graduation: 90% of project participants served during the project year will continue in school for the next academic year, at the next grade level, or will have graduated from secondary school with a regular secondary school diploma.
  4. Secondary School Graduation: 50% of all current and prior year UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project had an expected high school graduation date in the school year, will complete a rigorous secondary school program of study and graduate that year with a regular secondary school diploma.
  5. Postsecondary Enrollment: 70% of all current and prior UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project had an expected high school graduation date in the school year, will enroll in a program of postsecondary education by the fall term immediately after high school graduation or will have received notification, by the fall term immediately following high school, from an institution of higher education, of acceptance but deferred enrollment until the next academic semester (e.g. spring semester).
  6. Postsecondary Completion: 37% of participants who enrolled in a program of postsecondary education, by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or by the next academic term (e.g. spring term) as a result of acceptance but deferred enrollment, will attain either an associate or bachelor’s degree within six years following graduation from high school.

The date of last review was November 16, 2021.

II. DEPARTMENTAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  • Secured Upward Bound funding through 2028 – The Upward Bound (UB) grant writing competition closed in January of 2022 and CSUC received notification in June confirming that both the Original Upward Bound and Upward Bound II grants have been funded for another 5-year cycle (2023 – 2028). The Original UB grant funding totals $3,333,130 for five years, while UB II will receive $2,019,995 for the five-year period. Combined, both programs will serve 201 students annually. The project is still awaiting results of the Upward Bound Math and Science (UBMS) grant writing competition and hopes to receive funding notification for both UBMS grants in late August 2022.

  • Returned to a full in-person summer residential program – After offering a virtual summer program in 2020 and a hybrid program in 2021, students and staff were excited to return to a full in-person residential summer program. On June 12th, project staff welcomed 178 participants from 16 high schools in the six-county CSUC service area for a six-week residential program. Participants lived in Shasta and Lassen Halls and followed a traditional schedule of academic classes, STEM activities, community service projects, and college and career preparation activities. For the first time since 2019, all courses were taught in person with teachers also offering weekly office hours to enhance student learning. Individual and group tutoring was available to students daily for three hours in the evening. Upward Bound staff created COVID-19 protocols that included testing each student weekly before entering the residence halls and allowing only staff and students to access the residence halls. Additionally, all teachers used Google Classroom, a platform familiar to all students. In case of infection, a student was easily able to access class materials from home and keep up with the class while in isolation.
    Summer Program Snapshot:
    • 1,400 COVID-19 tests administered to students and live-in personnel
    • 178 high school students participated in the residential program
    • 52 staff, faculty and interns provided direct support and instruction
    • 39 in-person course sections offered to students. Courses included physics, calculus, English, Advanced Spanish, medical terminology, computer animation.
    • 9 large program events took place to enhance the summer program student experience. Events included the Bidwell Park Cleanup, a series of workshops that focused on financial literacy, graduate school and healthy relationships, and a career fair that welcomed nearly 50 professionals from our community.
    • 6 weeks of academic instruction, college, and career preparation
    • 3 trips on the last week of the program were offered to 75 high school seniors. Students visited 15 campuses throughout Northern and Southern California.
  • Resumed In-Person College Tours – After a two-year hiatus due to travel restrictions brought about by the pandemic, project staff were eager to resume college tours for participants. In the fall of 2021, 50 participants toured San Jose State, CSU East Bay, San Francisco State, Sacramento State, UC Santa Cruz, UC Merced, UC Berkeley, and UC Davis. A different group of 25 students toured Southern California colleges in the Spring of 2022. Those campuses included UCLA, USC, UC Irvine, CSU San Diego, UC San Diego and Long Beach State University. After concluding the 2022 Summer Program, 75 incoming seniors took part in three separate college tours and visited UC Davis, UC Berkeley, UC Merced, Santa Clara University, Stanford, Long Beach State, Sacramento State, Sonoma State University and many others.

  • Offered First Microbiology Experience – With the leadership of John Vang, former Upward Bound student and current CSUC graduate student, 20 Upward Bound Math and Science students enrolled in this new course. Students met daily for two hours and gained exposure and hands on experience working with bacteria and learning how to identify it after collecting samples from the creek that runs through campus. The course also provided students insight on careers in the microbiology field, other science fields, and research currently happening at Chico State. Students were able to visit various research site that included:
    • Dr. Geszvain Lab
      • Bacterial physiology, metal transformations by environmental bacteria, work with contaminated wastewater to find strains of bacteria to help reverse contamination.
    • Dr. Gorman Lab
      • Scoliosis, complex genetic diseases, comparative genetics, working to understand the molecular mechanisms of control posture.
    • Dr. Keller Lab
      • Pancreatic beta cell biology and the molecular and cellular mechanisms of type 2 diabetes.
    • Gateway Science Museum
      • Fossils and formations in California, a builder’s summer (building block allowing students to build their own inventions, imaginative playground).
    • Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve (BCCER)
      • 7,835 acres of diverse habitats. Helps provide sites with natural resources to support research and teaching to Chico State students and the public.
    • Dr. Banet Lab
      • Salmon research, fish/aquatic ecology, evolution, fish conservation.
    • Dr. Cobian Lab
      • Fungus, plant fungal interactions, fungal community assembly.
  • Jump Start to College – The Upward Bound graduating class of 2022, was able to take part in this in-person session on June 21st on the Chico State campus. The purpose of Jump Start to College is for graduates to get individual assistance in completing to-do lists from their college, clearing financial aid and registration holds and reviewing all housing contracts and deadlines. With the help of Upward Bound Advisors, students can have all their questions and concerns answered and begin their first semester in college free of hurdles. Additionally, Upward Bound alumni currently enrolled at CSU, Chico, form a student panel and answer all college inquiries and share their own experiences as college students. The graduates were treated to dinner and then completed the day’s activities with our Upward Bound graduation ceremony with their families and current Upward Bound students in attendance.

  • Offered Robotics/Engineering Course – Students in the Upward Bound Math and Science and STEM programs received a wide range of supplemental STEM instruction and exposure during the summer program. Students with an interest in engineering enrolled in the six-week Robotics/Engineering course where they worked in pairs to build and program their own VEX 5 robots to complete certain tasks. In addition to the engineering aspect of the course, students delved into manufacturing by designing and creating pieces to enhance their robots using the project’s 3D printer.

III. Changes in Policies and Procedures

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act signed into law in 2020 allowed Upward Bound grantees to request an increase in the dollar amount of stipends awarded to participants. Due to our savings of not offering a residential summer program in 2020 and a smaller hybrid program in 2021, we have once again requested an increase in participant stipends for the 2022 summer program. If approved by the U. S. Department of Education (funder), students who completed the internship during the summer program would be awarded up to $500 per month, instead of the $300 regularly allowed. Those students not in a worksite would earn $300 a month for their summer program participation instead of the $60 traditionally allowed.

IV. Resources Summary

Resource Allocation:

Original Upward Bound Grant
June 1, 2021 – May 31, 2022
125 participants

  • 2021-2022 allocation ---- $666,626
  • Program expenses ---- $637,268
  • Projected carry forward ---- $29,358

Upward Bound II Grant
September 1, 2021 – August 31, 2022
76 participants

  • 2021-2022 allocation ---- $403,999
  • Program expenses ---- $382,578
  • Projected carry forward ---- $21,421

Upward Bound Math & Science
September 1, 2021– August 31, 2022
56 participants

  • 2021-2022 allocation ---- $297,601
  • Program expenses ---- $297,601
  • Projected carry forward ---- $0

Upward Bound STEM
October 1, 2021 – September 30, 2022
60 participants

  • 2021-2022 allocation ---- $297,601
  • Program expenses ---- $297,601
  • Projected carry forward ---- $0

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA)
July 1, 2021 – June 30, 2022
30 eligible participants from Colusa, Glenn, Sutter and Yuba counties

  • 2021-2022 allocation ---- $58,102
  • Program expenses ---- $58,102
  • Projected carry forward ---- $0

California Department of Education – Summer Food Service Grant (SFSP)
June 1, 2021 – July 30, 2022

  • 2021-2022 allocation ---- $16,690.89
  • Program expenses ---- $16,690.89

Amy Kee Scholarship Endowment

  • 2021-2022 assets ---- $43,849.39
  • 2021-2022 contributions ---- $1,579.06

Total funding in 2021-2022 ---- $1,786,047.34

Human Resources:

Peggy Devol (Fiscal Administrator) retired in December 2021after working with Upward Bound for more than a decade. Fortunately, Karissa Lozier-Hamby stepped into the Fiscal Administrator role almost seamlessly. Karissa brings a wealth of experience in areas of budget planning and tracking, human resources and contracts and accounts payable.

Vannessa Avelar stepped into the role of Office Manager in January 2022. Vannessa was an Upward Bound student and worked as a Student Assistant in our office while completing her undergraduate and graduate degrees at CSUC. Her years of experience have been extremely helpful as the project returned to an in-person summer program.

Justin Henry served as the Original Upward Bound Advisor for more than 5 years, but has transitioned to a new role with the CSUC College of Business. We’re excited to now have an ally in the College of Business Student Success Center, but Justin will be sorely missed by Upward Bound students and staff.

Facilities/Equipment:

  • With summer program room and board savings from 2020, the project was able to purchase 40 laptops for students to use for the 2021 hybrid summer program and for weekly tutoring provided by Upward Bound during the school year. Students and parents completed and signed an agreement ensuring they would care for the laptop and were able to check it out for the entire school year.

V. Program Assessment of Past Year

Program Objectives:

  1. Academic Performance Grade Point Average (GPA): 60% of participants served during the project year will have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better on a four-point scale at the end of the school year.

    Exceeded – 83% of the participants served during the project year, had a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better.

  2. Academic Performance Test: 40% of UB seniors served during the project year, will have achieved at the proficient level on state assessments in reading/language arts and math.

    N/A – No state assessments were administered due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  3. Secondary School Retention and Graduation: 90% of project participants served during the project year will continue in school for the next academic year, at the next grade level, or will have graduated from secondary school with a regular secondary school diploma.

    Exceeded – 99% of participants served during the 2019-2020 academic year continued in school at the next grade level or graduated with a diploma.

  4. Secondary School Graduation: 50% of all current and prior year UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project had an expected high school graduation date in the school year, will complete a rigorous secondary school program of study and graduate that year with a regular secondary school diploma.

    Exceeded – 81% of participants graduated high school having completed A-G coursework.

  5. Postsecondary Enrollment: 70% of all current and prior UB participants, who at the time of entrance into the project had an expected high school graduation date in the school year, will enroll in a program of postsecondary education by the fall term immediately after high school graduation or will have received notification, by the fall term immediately following high school, from an institution of higher education, of acceptance but deferred enrollment until the next academic semester (e.g. spring semester).

    Exceeded – 83% of graduates in 2020 enrolled in college immediately following high school.

  6. Postsecondary Completion: 37% of participants who enrolled in a program of postsecondary education, by the fall term immediately following high school graduation or by the next academic term (e.g. spring term) as a result of acceptance but deferred enrollment, will attain either an associate’s or bachelor’s degree within six years following graduation from high school.

    Exceeded - 51% of participants received their degree within six years, although the data shows that some participants were still enrolled in their seventh year.

Ongoing Assessment Efforts:

Demographic Reporting

A total of 317 participants were served during the 2021-2022 academic year by the four Upward Bound programs. See breakdown by program below.
Original Upward Bound – 125 participants
Upward Bound II – 76 participants
Upward Bound Math & Science – 56 participants
Upward Bound STEM – 60 participants

Ethnicity Breakdown

The ethnicity breakdown is reflected in the following graph and reflects the low-income/first generation population of the six-county service area in Northern California. Upward Bound staff is working diligently to increase the number of Asian, African American and Native American students who apply and are served by the program. Recruitment and outreach also include community organizations that serve these populations within our communities.

2021-2022 Ethnicity Data. Latino 55%, Asian 28%, Caucasian 14%, African American 2%, Native American 1%, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander 1%

VI. Analysis

Update on 2020-2021 Objectives

Create an online Upward Bound application and a new virtual recruitment plan – Because of COVID-19, the project has had to adjust program service delivery, but now also needs to implement a new recruitment plan to accommodate for school closures and the new distance learning environment. Upward Bound staff is currently developing an online application that would allow students to apply electronically, while also meeting CSUC’s requirements to safeguard personal information. Paper applications will still be available to students in Spanish and English, but an online application would allow for a safer and faster method of collecting student information. In addition to the application, staff is also developing a new virtual interview process that would be done via Zoom, in order to speak with each applicant and their guardian about the benefits and requirements of Upward Bound.

Update: Cesar Alvarez (UB Asst. Director) and Chue Yang (UB Programmer/Analyst) successfully created an online application that was then approved by ITSS. The Project began disseminating this online application 2021 and students and parents quickly began using it in place of completing a paper application. The application allows applicants to save their progress and come back to complete the application at a later time, a necessary feature since students need parental information to complete the application. Virtual interviews (because staff weren’t able to meet students in person at their schools) were also a big success. Sending a Zoom invite to a student to conduct interviews allowed for parents/guardians to also attend the interview and ask pertinent questions about program services and requirements. Although we have returned to in-person interviews in 2022, we still allow for virtual interviews for students who are ill and can’t attend school.

Transition to a more useful database to assist with more effective data reporting – Data gathering for reporting purposes has been a challenge for several years with the database the project has used for the last decade. Last year, the project moved to a new database, but it isn’t user friendly and collecting and compiling information for annual reporting purposes proved to be too difficult. The Council for Opportunity in Education (COE), our national advocacy group has worked with Oracle to develop a new database specifically designed for TRIO programs to ease annual reporting processes. Upward Bound staff is currently using it on a trial basis and plans to make a final decision soon.

Update: The Project has purchased four licenses (one for each UB grant) for Empower, a TRIO database operated by the Council for Opportunity in Education). Getting the database up and running has been difficult, because Empower is so new and it doesn’t appear they have much experience with clients who operate multiple TRIO programs. Project staff have met with Empower programmers to suggest enhancements that would make it a more user-friendly database. We anticipate transitioning fully to Empower in the fall of 2022, once all enhancements have been completed by the vendor.

VII. Program Objectives for Next Academic Year

  • Implement Newly Awarded Grant Application Activities/Services
  • Enhance and Individualize Academic Year Services