Institute for Sustainable Development

 

Our Sustainable Future - CSU, Chico

Thursday, November 5th, 2009
Conference Schedule

Concurrent sessions will be held in the Bell Memorial Union (BMU) unless otherwise stated.
Registration starts at 8:00 a.m. with a continental breakfast buffet in BMU 100. (View map)

Please note: This page continues to be under construction. This schedule may be subject to change and we will continue to update this Web site weekly through October 30th.

9:00 - Noon 1/2 Day Wind Power Session
9:00 - 9:50 Concurrent Sessions
10:00 - 10:50 Keynote
11:00 - 12:15 Keynote
1:00 - 1:50 Concurrent Sessions
2:00 - 2:50 Keynote
3:00 - 3:50 Concurrent Sessions
4:00 - 5:15 Keynote
5:30 Guest Reception

BMU 210
9:00-Noon
1/2 Day Wind Power Session

(See schedule, pdf file)
From Small to High: New Technologies in Wind Power
Cristina Archer, CSU, Chico, and Scott Jackson, Powershacks, Inc., Organizers
Len Shepard, Sky Wind Power
This half-day session will illustrate the latest technologies in wind energy: small and high-altitude wind power. Small wind turbines are rated at 50 kW or less, enough to supply electricity to single households or agricultural pumps. A horizontal axis turbine is 20-m tall and can start operating at 3 m/s, making small wind power attractive for less windy locations. At the other hand of the spectrum, high-altitude wind power is a new technology that aims at extracting energy from the winds that blow aloft. Winds at altitudes between 500 and 10,000 m are so strong that, if their energy could be harnessed and delivered to the ground via tethered devices, they could meet 100 times our current energy needs. The session will describe the basics of both technologies.

Note: **The high-altitude wind power talks are part of the High Altitude Wind Power Conference, the remaining sessions of which will be hosted at the Cleantech Innovation Center (CIC) in Oroville on Thursday afternoon and Friday all day. Bus service provided on Thursday at 12:30 p.m., and Fridaty at 8:15 from the BMU, and at 5:00 p.m. from CIC, separate registration is required at www.hawpconference.com (starting on September 28th, 2009). Bus will departure will be from the 2nd & Ivy bus stop at the west side of Meriam Library, across from the parking structure.

A field trip to an operational 20 kW wind turbine installed in Chico will be offered on Saturday at 11 a.m.
See Saturday program for more details.

Concurrent Sessions
9:00-9:50 a.m.

BMU 204
9:00-9:50

Fair Food: Field to Table
Alida Cantor- California Institute for Rural Studies (CIRS)
Everyone’s talking about local/organic food, but often the discussion about sustainable agriculture doesn't go beyond the environmental angle.  Learn about social justice in the food system, why farm worker justice is critical to sustainability, and how you can bring fair food to your own school cafeteria.  We will start with a screening of “Fair Food: Field to Table,” a new short documentary by CIRS and filmmaker/photographer Rick Nahmias.  This documentary discusses the harsh realities of agricultural labor in the United States and current efforts to promote improved farm worker conditions.  After the documentary, we will open for discussion on the role of social justice and what you can do to support fair food.

BMU 303
9:00-9:50
Sustainable Living with Technology of Today
Joe Greene- CSU, Chico
Have you ever wondered why the earth is warming and the polar ice caps are melting?  Are you worried about plastic waste collecting in the oceans? What is your impact? Dr. Greene will discuss these questions and more, including current climate changes in the environment and the related causes from industry, natural climate events, farming practices, and consumers.  You will have an opportunity to calculate your carbon footprint and learn ways in which you can be more carbon neutral and reduce your impact on the environment through various conscious and conservative efforts. Lastly, Dr. Greene will discuss ways that plastics companies are trying to reduce their footprint and be more sustainable.

BMU 304
9:00-9:50
‘Diversion Excursion’ and ‘Sustainable Move Out’ – Two Successful Residence Hall Move Out Programs
Caitlin Steele and Jim Bolinger - San Francisco State University and Carey Galliani- CSU, Chico
Chico and SF State will highlight how to make a sustainable residential move out program. Both campuses successfully integrate University staff and faculty, students, community volunteers, and local charities to divert goods from the landfill. The City of Chico modeled the “Dump and Run’’ program after Diversion Excursion, and in 2006 DE won a California Integrated Waste Management award for innovated diversion. This presentation will highlight how to begin and implement a Sustainable Move Out program and the key actions, people, and marketing tools needed to make it thrive.

BMU 312
9:00-9:50
Environmental Impacts of Social and Cultural Revolutions
Cameron Scott
Using Costa Rica to highlight the failure of industrial conservation in saving the rain forests. The problem with conservation and environmental tactics is that it focuses on singular causes rather than the full spectrum of political, social, and cultural issues that drive wilderness destruction. The panelists, who resided in Costa Rica for their educational studies, suggest that drastic changes to world culture and land use ethics must be implemented to save the remaining forests and maintain a healthy land base. Nicaragua is exemplified to show how this type of change helped bring deforestation to a crawl during the Sandinista Revolution.

KEYNOTE
10:00-10:50
Bell Memorial Union Auditorium

Nico Stehr, Karl Mannheim Professor of Cultural Studies at the Zeppelin University, Friedrichshafen, Germany

Making the Impossible Possible: Adapting to Rapid Climate Change

Climatic warming is not a fleeting, temporary or short-lived phenomenon. It is important to state this outright, because the impression is often given, intentionally or otherwise, that the climate can be changed in one direction or the other in a short span of time. The policy of climate protection, with the support of influential circles within climate research, is predominantly one-sided. It is not the appropriate way to deal with the problem. Up to now, it is almost exclusively measures to do with energy, transport, industry and housekeeping that have enacted under the heading of climate protection; such as measures to save energy and to increase efficiency, and the corresponding legislative frameworks. The threat posed to the basic living conditions of society by climatic changes cannot be combated, as it has been up to now, only by protecting the climate from society, particularly given that many of these measures are of a symbolic nature. Additional effective efforts are required on the part of researchers, politicians and economic leaders in order to come to terms with the climatic dangers that already exist today, which will intensify in the future, even in the face of a successful climate protection policy. This protection cannot wait to be put in place only after we have lived through catastrophes in the wake of weather extremes; rather, they must be realized in the form of precautionary measures. And these are in short supply here and now!

KEYNOTE Panel
11:00-12:15

Bell Memorial Union Auditorium

Gwyneth Cravens, Dr. D. Richard ("Rip") Anderson, and Marcia Fernandez

What Role Can Nuclear Power Play in Solving the GHG and Energy Crises?
In this session three presentations will be followed by a Q&A session. 
How do we educate the public that global change is critical and action must be taken immediately?  Marcia Fernàndez will provide perspectives on what needs to be done to educate the public about the critical nature of global change.

One Future.  Decisions made today will impact our future.  In our quest for solutions to global climate change, all perspectives should be honestly evaluated.  What are the facts about nuclear power?  Global Science.  What are some global problems, and how significant are they?  Dr. Anderson will discuss the enormity of the ecological problems associated with global climate change. 

Power to Save the World.  What role can nuclear power play in solving the GHG and Energy crises?  Gwyneth Cravens will share her perspective that nuclear power is a safe energy source and an essential deterrent to global warming.

Book signing to follow at 12:30 p.m. outside BMU Auditorium.

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12:15-1:00 Lunch Break

Concurrent Sessions
1:00-1:50

BMU 204
1:00-1:50

Happiness—an Essential Prerequisite for a Sustainable Society

Lee Altier and Kirk Monfort- CSU, Chico
Current human population and consumption levels have exceeded the earth’s capacity for resource regeneration.  It is clear that consumption increases linearly with economic affluence; it does not plateau after the need for essential goods has been satisfied.  Thus, there has never been a generation of humans that expended so much on non-essential goods. Many people resist exhortations to sustainable living and less buying, thinking that it means the end of personal happiness. We aim to explore this common misconception of happiness and consumption. Sustainable living is not the enemy of human fulfillment, happiness, and well being; but rather may promote those ends.

BMU 209
1:00-1:50

Being and Knowing the Roots of Our Food
Francine Stuepnagel and Stephanie Elliot- GRUB
In this session we will take you on our journey of farming and our communities' choice to eat as local as possible. We will show you the basics to get your food off your own land as well as tips of personally knowing the producers of your food. We will also discuss why this is so crucial for our heath, environment and economy.

BMU 303
1:00-1:50

Creating an Institutional Structure Around Sustainability
Caitlin Steele and Jim Bolinger- San Francisco State University
With so many possible sustainability projects at hand, where do you begin? This presentation will outline how to set up an Institutional Structure for Sustainability on a college campus. SF State is creating an integrated planning approach to ensure that sustainability is incorporated into all projects, curricula, planning and operations. The presentation will identify the major steps a campus can take to complete a Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory, to create a Campus Wide Sustainability Committee, and to begin a Climate Action Plan.

BMU 304
1:00-1:50
Green Initiative Funds:  Campus and Community Economic Benefits
TallChief Comet and James Robinson IV- Humboldt State University
Many Universities have initiated variations of a “green” fund, which allocates money from student fees towards projects that advance the campus in sustainability.  People may immediately recognize the merit in reducing campus environmental impacts. However, there is another benefit to “green” funds; it provides new jobs for campus workers, students, and community businesses due to project implementation. Humboldt State University’s Humboldt Energy Independence Fund (HEIF) requires all projects receiving funding to entail substantial student involvement. Additionally, the University Facilities Department and outside contractors have seen increased work from HEIF projects.  Project examples, the extent of HEIF funding impact to the campus and local economy, and other benefits will be discussed in this presentation.

BMU 312
1:00-1:50
Not Just a Pretty Face- Making Urban Landscapes a Living Laboratory
Phil Evans, San Francisco State University and Louise Schiller, CSU, San Luis Obispo
SF State has embarked on a voyage of discovery for its students and staff. Our goal is to embody in an urban campus landscape an active laboratory of the physical, biological, and social processes that can build a better world.  Urban landscapes are valuable both as capital assets and as biological resources. We will present a model for using the urban landscape as a resource for sustainability education, integrating best landscape practices and involving academic partners fully in a vibrant research and education program.

BMU 314
1:00-1:50
Biodiesel as "Enviro-nomic" Stimulus- Why Accelerating a Biodiesel Infrastructure Makes Sense for the Environment and Economy
Mark Roberts- Springboard Biodiesel, LLC
Biodiesel has been traditionally viewed as an "alternative" fuel.  Springboard Biodiesel believes that it should be viewed instead as a preferred fuel since its use dramatically reduces airborne emissions, it can be produced from sustainable renewable sources, and made for significantly less than traditional diesel. This presentation will touch on the basic chemistry behind biodiesel, explain the benefits of biodiesel, and focus on a number of current successful case studies in the field.  Finally, we will discuss some near term threats to biodiesel adoption and make suggestions as to how to potentially address those threats.

KEYNOTE
2:00 - 2:50
Bell Memorial Union Auditorium

Howard Yana-Shapiro, Global Director Plant Science and External Research, Mars, Incorporated and Adjunct Professor, Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of California, Davis

The Economics of Sustainability:  Can we create a sustainable future?
How do we make decisions that will create a sustainable future?  What is the role of business in setting an agenda for sustainability?  Howard-Yana Shapiro, one of the founders of Seeds of Change and now Global Director for Plant Science and External Research at Mars, Incorporated, will discuss the economics of sustainability.   He will argue the data driven/technology neutral business decisions for sustainability need to be driven by science but with an understanding of limits. 

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Concurrent Sessions
3:00 - 3:50

BMU 204
3:00-3:50

Community Gardening in Schools
LaDona Knigge, Gavin Dixon- CSU, Chico, Stephanie Elliott and Sherri Scott - GRUB

This session will include a discussion on community gardening, with an emphasis on gardening in schools. Panelists will examine the process and development of community gardens at elementary schools as well as at the university level. Members of the panel have personally created school gardens all over our community, and work with teachers and children to start an education around gardening from a young age. The panel will also include a discussion of the Konkow Organic Garden, a garden at the Chico State campus run by students, which features a rain water capture system and a greenhouse.

BMU 209
3:00-3:50
In Defense of Food for All: Reading Michael Pollan in Comparative and Global Context
David Eaton, Susanna Boxall, Jesse Dizard, and Bill Loker- CSU, Chico

Michael Pollan’s influential books aim to help Americans “reclaim our health and happiness as eaters.”  He advocates the pleasures of knowing one’s food, and reform of U.S. subsidies in support of smaller farms and of local, organic, and fair-trade produce. But today, huge and vulnerable groups aren’t included in Pollan’s analyses, from migrant and peasant farmers, indigenous communities, and urban poor, to whole populations of countries reliant on food aid.  Drawing from research in California, Alaska, Honduras, and Congo, panelists explore how such people negotiate food sovereignty, security, health, nutrition, and survival in a neoliberal and globalizing world. We seek to situate Pollan’s ideas in their distinctively American lineages, and to critique and expand his proposals for food systems that can sustain local ecologies, social justice, and secure livelihoods both within and beyond U.S. borders. 

BMU 303
3:00-3:50
What is Sustainability, Anyway?
Robyn DiFalco- AS Sustainability Coordinator, CSU, Chico
Confused about what sustainability really means? Come listen to this roundtable discussion as various people offer their definition and examples of what sustainability means to them.

BMU 304
3:00-3:50
I Want a Green Building, Too! – Improving our Existing Buildings through Commissioning and Operational Changes
Bernard Keister- Guttmann & Blaevoet
In the United States, buildings annually consume over 30 percent of total energy and over 60 percent of electricity used.  Daily, five billion gallons of potable water is used to flush toilets.  Three quarters of our buildings were built before 1979.  Based on these numbers, it’s clear that we need to make existing buildings more energy and water efficient. Bolstered by the success of New Construction Commissioning, Existing Building Commissioning is increasingly demanded by property owners who understand that systemic evaluation of their facilities can generate opportunities to improve building operations. The presentation will include an overview of commissioning for existing buildings, its value, costs, paybacks, and justification.  Other topics will include LEED for Existing Buildings, Operations & Maintenance and Next Steps for owners.

BMU 312
3:00-3:50

Deep Sustainability
Mark Stemen- CSU, Chico
Reaching regional sustainability will require more than recycling and CFLs. This discussion will explore the deep cultural traditions that inhibit us from moving past surface “solutions” and into exploring what a truly sustainable life would feel like for the people living it.

BMU 314
3:00-3:50
Virtual is Viable: How you can increase your productivity and reduce your carbon footprint at work
Jamie Grettum- The Ken Blanchard Companies

A recent study of 2,000 Cisco employees showed an increase of $277 million annually in productivity by allowing employees to telecommute one to two days per week, and $10 million savings in fuels costs. Are you a business owner/manager looking for strategies to increase the pool of talent available for hire, retain top performers, increase productivity, and reduce carbon emissions? Are you an employee looking to get more done, increase work/life balance, and save on fuel costs every week? Telecommuting and full-time virtual positions are a key strategy. Technology advances allow contributors to meet, collaborate, and communicate as effectively as if they were in a room together. Come hear Jamie Grettum’s practical strategies and skills needed to excel as a virtual contributor.  

KEYNOTE
4:00-5:15
p.m.
Laxson Auditorium

Timothy J. LaSalle, CEO, Rodale Institute

Regenerative 21st Century Farming: A Solution to Global Warming
Organic agriculture is the most dependable strategy for capturing and storing atmospheric carbon dioxide In addition to climate stabilization organic agricultural carbon sequestration prevents erosion, improves food quality, and increases yields in drought and flood. Widespread adoption of organic agricultural practices will be economically beneficial and solve expensive challenges of food safety and clean water.

Since 1981, the Rodale Institute has maintained 3 farming systems. The conventionally managed system relies on herbicides for weed control and synthetic fertilizers for plant nutrients. The organic legume system depends on cover crops, intense rotation, and tillage to manage pests and nutrition. The integrated animal system receives manure and cover crops for nutrients, and uses tillage for weed control. Both organic systems have sequestered significant amounts of carbon, while the conventionally managed system has not. In addition, Rodale’s ten year experiment combining compost and cover crops sequestered carbon at average annual rates that exceeds the other organic system. This data demonstrates that organic farming methods can generate robust carbon sequestration over the soil profile, capable of mitigating 10-40% of annual global carbon emissions, if adopted on all tillable acres.

WELCOME RECEPTION
5:30-7:30
p.m.
Bell Memorial Union Auditorium

All registered conference attendees and speakers are invited to join us for a casual evening to kick off this conference, meet one another, collaborate, and enjoy! Greenie Awards will be presented and light refreshments will be served.

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